Paul Odobey Turret Clock

Discussion in 'Tower, Monumental & Street Clocks' started by scootermcrad, Oct 1, 2018.

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  1. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    As if I didn't have enough clock projects going on, I thought, "what's one more gonna' hurt?" (rolling eyes) You guys are probably getting sick of me, by now...

    ...anyway. So a friend of mine was approached about this one and he forwarded it to me knowing that I have an interest in European turret/tower clocks. So, a deal was made and now I have a new noise maker in the house. The clock is very complete and mechanically in great condition. I'm guessing it's probably 1890's (ish), but not really sure how to tell. The gentleman I purchased it from brought it into the U.S. sometime in the 1980's or early 90's, but didn't know much about the history. It appears to be mostly original, with the exception of the paint and it appears the detailing on the steel parts has been lost as well.

    Right now the clock runs nicely on 86 pounds, but the strike side is a bit sticky running on 71 pounds. It has been oiled, but definitely still needs a good cleaning and I need some time to familiarize myself with it, for that matter. Maybe it will run better after a good cleaning.

    The long term plan is to display this either in my shop or home and work it into the architecture. It will get a full restoration with correct paint and details, etc., new stand or wall mounts, and a dial of some sort. If it lives in our home, I have to figure out striking without my wife asking for a divorce. :)

    It wouldn't be me if I didn't ask a bunch of questions, so here goes:

    * Can anyone on here tell me how I might identify the year of construction and possibly model?
    * Am I running enough weight on the strike side? It seems like it needs a great deal more, but maybe something is hanging up. I swapped to 86 pounds and that helped, but still has troubles initiating the strike sequence.
    * Can someone recommend a more suitable rope than what came with this?
    * And last, does anyone have pictures of any of the correct lead-off components (output couplers, rods, bevel gears, motion-works, etc.) so I can be on the look-out or try and replicate them.

    Here's some pictures for you folks. Thanks ahead of time for any input, suggestions, etc.

    Thanks!
    Scott

    41o4XaZbGn4oh1vEKX4dZ8DFazqGiKRHa5wg4ZkE5UlZm8lNW-40yYmmmhXnOh0RsziRQmDVW397GfduXPj=w648-h863-no.jpg

    jPcuzRJdsFVvtxwTKFCSqwbxPAyiwr5GW2BwVbSehniMQCisFL7Oog6nxuIllYSbd0hKIdqLlGeZNVRTB9=w1150-h863-no.jpg

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    LJUE-3oDE5p6yT-FGdoAKsYun5pzFtOZr1-45sPYJNg15OmehEkeLeioi2jL5DWzFb8eBoG4h1yyeuaeXL=w1150-h863-no.jpg

    m-qFEYTuHyYWXg4qQbLX24Dbj28WCoy2UNgjMJt1fFYiwNBpFQAkoLJ-5M1GBt3b3ebcSZaPj9KgPKJ7z5=w1152-h863-no.jpg

    BGXBtRo-FdLu2hh9jw3dlUoYJTliauBohep9FO22-27pjiCUpS1xkpHP94SY_7uQ_aMNG8Unzcj3tv4MP5k=w648-h863-no.jpg
     
  2. gvasale

    gvasale Registered User
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    If the barrels are metal, wire rope is suitable IMO. Heavier weight on the strike side.
     
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  3. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    Thanks for the input! The barrels are brass. I'm certainly open to wire rope. I had seen people use a white rope of some sorts in home displays and was wondering what that might be? Long term, when the installation gets worked into the architecture, I was definitely going to use wire ropes and try to get a couple more days in before winding. As or now, when it actually stays running, it runs for about 18 or 20 hours before needing to be wound.

    Looking forward to spending a little time with this clock. I'm hoping a good cleaning and re-lube will give me some positive results. I have to take quite a bit a part to get to all of the going train pivots, so I want to wait until I have some good quality time to devote.
     
  4. FDelGreco

    FDelGreco Registered User
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    I use white rope on my home tower clocks. At hardware stores you can get white rope -- about 1/8 ' or 3/16" D that is made specifically for replacing the pull start ropes for lawn mowers and other home power equipment. I think it is rated at about 140 pounds. I don't remember if it is nylon or polypropylene.

    If you use wire rope and are concerned it will abrade softer brass barrels, I've used wire rope that is encased in a clear plastic cover. It's on one of my time-only tower clocks that I've been running for 10 years -- and winding daily -- without any signs of wear. The clock weight is 35 pounds.

    Frank
     
  5. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    Thanks Frank! That fits the description of the stuff I was thinking of. I wasn't sure if it was as simple as hardware store rope or not. I figured someone here would know. I'll take a look for it!

    I've been running this off and on over the past couple weeks with the 71 pound weight on the going and the 86 pounder on the strike side. (let's assume that the weights that came with it are the correct values) After 10-15 minutes, the clock quits after the maintaining power spring has relaxed, so I'm dragging somewhere. It doesn't do this when I run the 86 pound on the going train, so it's overcoming whatever resistance exists with more weight. Maybe I'm sticking in the maintaining power itself? Easy enough to pull apart, I think. I was also going to check to see that I don't have my depths wrong from when I bolted the drums pivots back to the bed. I suppose if it was depthing too deep it could cause some extra drag. Same experience on the strike side, with the feeling that 86 isn't enough. So power loss somewhere in the strike train, also. Fan blades set for least resistance. Winding barrel and pivots were removed and reinstalled in this case, also.

    Thoughts?
     
  6. FDelGreco

    FDelGreco Registered User
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    Whenever you buy a tower clock, don't expect that the weights that came with it are the correct ones.

    Frank
     
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  7. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    I certainly would agree that it's a poor assumption. Only reason I am, (for now) is because the previous owner displayed this clock in his home with these weights and ran it.

    This could also be a "ran when parked" situation. HAHA! Entirely possible that it simply never ran correctly on these weights.
     
  8. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    Update on the Odobey clock...

    I have this thing running pretty good now. I did some cleaning on the pivots and used some good quality clock oil to get everything lubed properly. The previous owner wasn't a tower clock person and I'm guessing had a lot of issues with this clock and semi-gave up on it. The pendulum bob had to be adjusted up approximately 1-1/4" to keep proper time. That's A LOT!! Now it keeps great time and strikes nicely. It still needs a good cleaning, but is functioning in it's original state for the time being. I'll try to get some videos and post them soon.

    I'm still looking for more information on the clock (questions above), but have run into a more interesting thing. When this clock strikes the hours it strikes TWICE. For example, if it's 8:00 it will strike 8 times, wait about 20-30 seconds and strike 8 times again. So strange. Looking at the cam lobes, it appears it may be designed to do this, but I'm still trying to figure this thing out. Maybe I'm missing something. If it was actually designed to do this, I bet it was very annoying at 12:00! HA! So something must not be right.

    Few pictures of the strike rack and assembly (again! I haven't cleaned it yet.)

    Rs9rCBao_fSRbiPn5h91QoHY2PCGYmlSa-_ycN7UBgCYKHKqVbZVQrrfs7M6SCbhBYJBDMZkiqORwHUd4_=w1178-h883-no.jpg

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    And here's the cam I mentioned. See the two steps? Thoughts?

    9dosJn2LfKx0uQW1AhiUiU09puSDMfeDM2MvCqlyFCMlYaVnpE2E-zkagj97ctcCB7-h9F571zJ10BCPxV=w1178-h883-no.jpg
     
  9. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    Also, I'm still looking for information on motion-works assemblies. I got some pictures from a gentleman in South Africa that has some components, but I'm having a hard time keeping in touch with him. The assembly pieces are much larger than I expected. They would be for a wall pass-thru style mount, I guess. I'm wondering if maybe anyone might recognize any of these as being used by other makes or if these were Odobey only. When the time comes, it would be nice to find correct parts when I set this up permanently.

    3V7IHgej8pXhSCSueaOq3VBnhHL_Ib_KJAA5IneE1Wku2otpw1EnQa8J9PwLSPcWzyjzKENzC4gLlDYEtS=w1178-h883-no.jpg
     
  10. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    A repeat on the hour strike was popular in the area of Europe where your clock was made. Many French/Belgium made clocks have it. It is not what I would consider common on tower clocks but there are other reports of them here and elsewhere.
     
  11. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    Oh! That's good to know and very interesting. So maybe I'm not missing something, here. That makes me feel better. Sure have to do a lot more winding, though. HAHA

    Thanks for the info, Jim!
     
  12. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    You might consider doubling the weight on both sides and compounding the fall to double your run time. Here is an example. Unless you hang the weights overhead or cut holes in your floors your only alternative is compounding of the weight system....it is using 3/16" stainless steel cable on this clock.

    IMG_2070 (2).JPG
     
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  13. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    Yep! I've been thinking I'm going to have to do this at the VERY least. The long term solution will be to mount it somewhere where I can get a good run, which may honestly end up meaning I will have to cut some holes, but if I can get it down to where I only have to wind it once a day, I don't mind. Right now, I have to wind the strike side 3 times and the time side once. The compounding would be absolutely worth it! The stand will also be changed to something sturdier.

    I really do love this "little" clock! I'm looking forward to one day getting a nice sized dial setup somewhere and an actual chime and hammer, of some kind. I will have to come up with a night silencing setup as well. That's all part of the fun, though! :)
     
  14. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    I finally got a decent video of this clock striking. I still haven't done any restoration to the clock, just getting things running. It keeps very accurate time. The pilot dial is about 7 minutes behind, for some reason, so I need to address that, but knowing that makes it easy to set.

    (Hopefully this works) I've tried inserting the video below. This is the clock striking 11:00. At 11:02 it will strike 11 more times. I just recorded the first strike sequence, since it's exactly the same sequence. Didn't figure anyone would want to listen to me breathing for 2 extra minutes. HA!





    Also, does anyone have ANY pictures of motion works assemblies made by ANY French turret clock manufacturer from the late 1800's or early 1900's? I haven't found much at all out on the interweb. Any help would be appreciated.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. novicetimekeeper

    novicetimekeeper Registered User

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    That's rather more audio than video but congrats on the progress!
     
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  16. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    Click on the "Attached Files" in the box below the body of the post. You should be able to see the video.
     

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