Paint Details for an A.S. Hotchkiss Restoration

Discussion in 'Tower, Monumental & Street Clocks' started by scootermcrad, Nov 23, 2016.

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  1. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    Hey folks,

    I have another thread going on our A.S. Hotchkiss restoration, but I decided it would be best to start a thread specific to the paint on this clock, since it's so incredible.

    Our movement appears to be mostly repainted and with it we have lost many details. The wheels themselves appear that they may be unmolested, but the structure components seem to have had paint slapped on at some point during its life. I've talked with a couple members with regards to the paint restoration process and that was incredibly helpful, and I have a general plan in place for this, however yesterday a wrench was thrown in that plan, a bit.

    Yesterday I had an opportunity to see an original, unmolested A.S. Hotchkiss movement in person and it has the original paint details intact, including many hand-painted details. The pinstriping has never been a concern for me and have always planned on replicating it, but yesterday I found there to be many more details that I would like to consider replicating. I assume they are hand painted and wondering what would be the best practice for recreating these larger and more intricate details. The work is so good, it almost appears to be printed. I'm blown away.

    Here is ours in its current condition.

    IMG_2381_zpsytwxmwac.jpg

    IMG_2422_zpsmqi3mpsw.jpg

    And here is an unmolested, all-original that belongs to Phil Wright. You can really see the level of detail that I'll have to replicate when restoring our movement.

    IMG_2543_zpswlkwidsz.jpg

    IMG_2541_zpssmyr6h6v.jpg

    IMG_2542_zpszvfpmtdq.jpg

    IMG_2538_zpsoljsbojs.jpg

    IMG_2563_zps5xsumu7a.jpg


    About every inch of this clock would have had pinstriping details, which again, I'm not too worried about recreating, but the murals I'm very concerned about. There's not enough there to know what they were supposed to look like, but there's enough there to know that they were an important detail.

    Does anyone have pictures of what they COULD have looked like? Any suggestions on how to recreate them once we know what they look like? Air brushing seems like a modern approach or even screen printing a graphic, but I'm concerned that just wouldn't look correct. I would like to hear some input on the topic.

    Thanks!
    Scott
     
  2. gvasale

    gvasale Registered User
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    The only "guaranteed" Hotchkiss clock I've ever seen is brown, not green. It has a pinwheel escapement and for this reason I believe its possible to have been made in the appropriate time frame maybe before or concurrent with the Seth Thomas takeover.

    The similarities between ST & Hotchkiss are easily seen.

    I suppose any paint theme could be had for a price.
     
  3. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    Definitely a pinwheel escapement and believed to be constructed between 1869 and 1875, but mostly likely 1873 to 1875.

    Interesting! Is there a feeling that the paint on ours could actually be original with the black (ish) color and green wheels and components?
     
  4. Jeremy Woodoff

    Jeremy Woodoff Registered User
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    I suppose there are ways to determine if there are earlier layers of paint on your clock. Art conservators can remove later layers of overpainting in order to restore paintings on canvas, wood, or plaster.
     
  5. gvasale

    gvasale Registered User
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  6. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    That's fantastic! Does that movement belong to you? Do you happen to have more pictures? Lots of similarities.
     
  7. gvasale

    gvasale Registered User
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    No, it's not mine. I'd have to look for more pictures. There may be more, not sure don't remember.
     
  8. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    No problem! I appreciate the info you've provided. I just don't see much on A.S Hotchkiss movements, so I always keep my eyes open. Thank you!
     
  9. scootermcrad

    scootermcrad Registered User
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    Update. We visited the movement again today and took a closer look around at the paint details. The black paint that was applied was not applied very well. Thankfully! Looking close, I found that just rubbing my finger on a couple places flaked the paint off to reveal that it indeed appears to have the same paint scheme as the example I posted pictures of. Looking closer at the wheels, it seems that several have been wire brushed (scratches visible) removing much of the green paint. I suspect they would have had the same pinstriping scheme. So that is a promising find!
     
  10. BLKBEARD

    BLKBEARD Registered User

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    You might try poking around on www.smokstak.com

    It's a website forum of Old Iron enthusiasts. Hit & Miss Engines, Steam Driven Tractors, etc.

    There are extremely well versed iron restorers that frequent that site who would be more than happy to share their techniques with you. I think you'll find everything your looking for as far as paint & decal work on iron.
    Those guys are diehards and some do amazing showroom fresh restorations
     

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