Owner built precision regulator

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by jhe.1973, May 11, 2011.

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  1. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
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    Interesting, Jim. It sounds like maybe there was a bit of a "break in" period, perhaps with the bearings. Were they lubricated, or running dry?
     
  2. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    #102 jhe.1973, Nov 20, 2014
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2014
    Hi Harold,

    Thanks for bringing up that possibility - I hadn't thought of the bearings as a possible 'break in'. Along that line, it is possible that any/or all of the bearings may not have been seated perfectly perpendicular to the axis of the arbor and in the months since assembly they could have 'wiggled' into alignment.

    I am only explaining this possibility this way for illustration purposes because any error would be tiny. Because you got me thinking along these lines, I realized that my use of my precision angle plate w/vise as a mount for the movement plates (for boring the bearing holes as shown in post #87) could be a (not too likely) possibility for error.

    I have had to un-learn other standard machinist/tool & die practices in the past when it came to making this prototype movement. I now wish that I had taken the extra time to mount the plates directly on the mill table so that I could be sure no error crept in this way.

    ARRRGH! There, I feel much better now!

    I am pretty sure that I used a drop of oil on the bearings the last time I assembled this because I seemed to find that the Nano oil helped reduce the friction slightly.

    I actually would rather not use any oil in the bearings because of the larger surface area than a standard pivot/bushing. Winslow is called High Desert and we have a terrific dust problem and I figure that the extra surface for dust will just attract more of it.

    Of course, now I wish that I had built a more air tight cabinet years ago!

    Oh my, .................... will the surprises/doubts/questions ever end?

    :glasses:
     
  3. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    #103 jhe.1973, May 1, 2015
    Last edited: May 1, 2015
    Hi Everyone,

    A friend of mine has asked if I have used the Microset timer I bought 'cuz he wants to know how complicated it is to use so ................................... I finally stole some time to hook it up:

    1.JPG

    When I reopened the box it came in, I saw the invoice is dated 5-24-2013 ....... yikes!

    I must be having fun because time sure has flown. (considering this forum, I am going to disregard the joke that has to be there)

    This came just as I was finding my house sinking and only now am I able to get to it.

    Another reason I did not do this right away was because the joints of my case are rather tight and the cords to the sensors are rather large. So, I put this off 'till I could decide where to locate some type of flange for the cords.

    To show the sequence I often use when making something like this (with a bolt pattern & other holes that must be transferred) here are some views. The first one was deciding where to mount this flange to allow my drill to clear the sides and back. When I built this cabinet I figured I'd add a peaked top and bracket bottom (in my spare time). So I had to consider this possibility too.

    :cyclops:

    Here is what I decided:

    2.JPG

    The pin is in one of the wire holes for alignment and I only drill the screw holes for their root diameter. That way the flange can be a drill jig. Then I only open up one of the holes at a time and screw it down before I drill any others holes. I go through the extra steps of drilling, in effect, the tap drill size in the wood, removing the assembly, opening each screw hole and screwing it back down before I move to the next hole.

    Yes, these are a lot of extra steps but I have learned to do prototype things this way to minimize the chance of errors creeping in that may have an affect on performance later. This is especially true when working with metal assemblies and lots of holes to a bolt pattern.

    So, here it is with just the wire holes and screw holes:

    3.JPG

    Because the .140 inch dia. holes for the wires have to be opened up to 3/8 inch for the plugs I did this in steps to minimize splintering:

    4.JPG

    Here are the finished holes showing the size of the plugs:

    5.JPG

    There were more steps in drill sizes between the last 2 views, but you get the idea. Here is a closer view of the finished assembly:

    6.JPG

    For those of you not familiar with the Microset, the sensor with the alligator clip is the acoustic sensor and the other the optic one that I am going to be using. I put them both in just in case I find a later need for the acoustic one.

    This shows the entire set up along with my most valuable horological reference work on the right:

    8.JPG

    Did you really think that my bizarre sense of humor is ALL original?
     
  4. John MacArthur

    John MacArthur Registered User
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    I had a great visit from Jim and his daughter Angela, and we discussed many aspects of clock construction. He's a very talented, thoughtful, and perceptive guy.

    I hope I get the chance to reciprocate soon.

    Johnny
     
  5. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    #105 jhe.1973, May 3, 2015
    Last edited: May 3, 2015
    Awwwww shucks,

    Thanks a bunch for the kind words Johnny, but I hope that you get the time to share some photos of the prize winning clocks that you built. Thanks also for the tips you so generously gave concerning making ruby jewels & pallets.

    Seeing as how Johnny let the cat out of the bag (wasn't trying to keep it in anyway), here is a shot of Angela cutting the ratchet teeth for a music box we are repairing for one of our chapter members:

    DSC_0928a.JPG

    She is now my apprentice & I am trying to teach her everything I know about everything I know.

    Should be done in a few days. :whistle:

    Anyway, I fiddled around with my new toy today and realized that if I tip the optical pickup I could get it to the center of the pendulum swing:

    2.JPG

    Then I found that I could get the timer in perfect beat, reading '0' which was a very good sign.

    Next I changed the count to 60 so it would give me a report every 60 seconds and this was one of the first readings:

    3.JPG

    This was actually the high of the first few readings, most were one or two divisions lower.

    By the time I got the camera & tripod set up, the readings had increased to two digits at the end like so:

    4.JPG

    The temperature was rising all morning into the 80s and there was a very slight breeze. Being Saturday, our street traffic was fairly calm. Still, the total variation over the 1/2 hour was as shown between these two shots.

    We live right on Route 66 in the heart of downtown and the clock is only 72 feet from the left lane of one way traffic.

    Yes, I measured that distance...................... yes, I'm that anal! :cyclops:

    I took photos of each reading 60 seconds apart for 1/2 hour. I have the Microset set up to give a beep each time it takes a reading so it was easy to snap another photo.

    After 20 minutes of listening for the beeps the thought did occur to me that I was behaving like one of Pavlov's dogs. Because I wasn't salivating I think I'm OK.

    What particularly pleased me is that these readings tend to reinforce my memory that I had observed stable timekeeping of within 1 1/2 seconds over a three week period 30+ years ago. This sure beats (pun intended) the TIMEKUBE from years ago:

    5.JPG

    I am now chomping at the bit to get this clock mounted more solidly..................or maybe I really am salivating! :excited:

    P.S. Johhny, I too hope you get the chance to visit soon!
     
  6. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

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    Also, the optical pickups are sensitive to ambient light.
    Things like lights, people moving around, camera flashes
    and such are all involved.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  7. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    #107 jhe.1973, May 30, 2015
    Last edited: May 30, 2015
    Hi Tinker,

    Thanks for your comment. I have been reading the MicroSet manual and it mentions that the optical sensor's LED is infrared. Is this also affected by ambient light?

    Just wondering 'cuz I have found another detail I have to consider if I ever get to doing long term testing.

    As I mentioned, I found that I could get the sensor in the middle but here is what happens to the pickup after about 5 or 6 days:

    5-29-15web.JPG

    The first time this happened I thought I might have bumped the clock so I just moved the pickup back to the center. But true to my flexible house, it is back where it wants to be. The MicroSet shows -7% beat error when it started at zero.

    I think I have to get my next regulators finished so I can use this clock as a seismograph! Or maybe I should call my house a tent?

    :whistle:

    I also need to correct my statement in post #105 about it being a good sign that I could get the pickup in perfect beat.

    By reading the instructions further, it mentions that to measure the beat of a clock you must use the acoustic sensor. I then realized that the optical sensor could always be placed in the exact center of pendulum swing regardless of the beat of the clock.

    Yep, when all else fails, read the instructions!

    DUH!
     
  8. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

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    We are engineers, we don't need no stink'n instructions!
    Tinker Dwight
     
  9. tok-tokkie

    tok-tokkie Registered User

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    I let my IR sensor run through the night (and day). I then viewed the data as a graph. There is a lot of scatter in the data but you could clearly see it decreasing when it became dark. My clock is next to a grass door to the outside. I then made a cardboard cover with a slot for the pendulum regulating nut so that the ambient light was largely excluded and the scatter was much reduced and the day/night difference more or less eliminated. The IR sensor was dark to reduce the influence of ambient light.
     
  10. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    OMG! ROFLOL - and then some!

    Here is a video I posted close to 2 years ago, At the start I say, "Turntable? Who the heck needs a turntable. I don't need no stink'n turntable".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3uAwB6XIH8

    tok-tokie,

    Thanks much for your input and suggestion of blocking the ambient light. It confirms what Tinker mentioned and provides a solution once I get to using the MicroSet for longer term measuring.
     
  11. jhe.1973

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    #111 jhe.1973, Jul 13, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2015
    Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.

    Hi Everyone,

    I have a cylinder music box to repair for a member of one of our chapters.

    Because we have discussed gear tooth shape in this thread, I am posting what I learned here.

    This box uses two spring barrels, one driving through the other. The barrel that is not shown just has ratchet teeth on it and its tension is fed into the barrel shown. This gives twice the playing time, but puts twice the force on one set of teeth.

    While working out the proper shape for a cutter for the gear teeth, I realized that this is a great example of the effects of engaging friction.

    These teeth are badly deformed and I could not find one that could be used as a template for grinding a cutter. They all looked bent, some much more than others.

    Here is the barrel and pinion in my depth tool and set up in my optical comparator. The assembly is set to the correct center distance of the music box arbors:

    1.JPG

    And here it is w/the light on and projecting to the screen, magnified 20 times:

    1a.JPG

    This next view shows the action of the barrel on the right driving the pinion on the left:

    2.JPG

    The center line of the screen's scale is set on the center line of the arbors and it is apparent that the teeth are coming into contact quite a bit above the center line of the two gears. The pinion on the left is digging into the brass barrel teeth on the right as the barrel is forcing the pinion to rotate.

    I posted this setup on YouTube to show this action as a video:

    https://youtu.be/cI2WUDjj1r8

    After showing this video at our chapter meeting yesterday, one of our members had the great insight to suggest viewing the action with the thrust on the opposite side of the gear teeth.

    DUH! Why didn't I think of that!

    Continued in the next post.................................
     
  12. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.

    So today I did just what my friend suggested, but I found that I had to add the most sensitive dial indicator that I have on the right of the table:

    3.JPG

    My DRO only has a .0005 inch resolution and I was getting a tiny amount of light as the teeth met on the center line. Each division on this indicator is 50 millionths:

    4.JPG

    And here is the tooth contact in relation to the center line:

    6.JPG

    The tiny amount of light between each tooth and the center line is only .00085 inch and the DRO wasn't sensitive enough to measure it. It would jump from the nearest .0005 inch to the next .001 inch.

    Sooooo, I would call this close enough to be able to assume that the original tooth contact was intended for the center line. This also means that I can use the unworn section of the best barrel tooth and mirror image it to complete both sides of the cutter shape.

    At least that's my story and I'm sticking to it!

    :whistle:
     
  13. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

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    Re: Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.

    Although, the back sides of the teeth are never used,
    it seem a properly shaped back side can have its
    purpose.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  14. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.


    Hi Tinker!

    Couldn't agree more.

    Being able to view and measure the unworn side of a few of the better teeth on the barrel is a big time saver for me. I don't have to work up to the correct profile with multiple trial and error cuts.

    :coolsign:
     
  15. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.

    Yep, especially when sitting down!

    Now I know I'm getting old. It took me almost 2 months to come up w/this!

    :cyclops: :screwball: :whistle:
     
  16. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.

    Hi Everyone,

    Well, I FINALLY made it back to post some progress!

    On 10-4-14 I showed a clock stand I had started and promised to post more when I got more shop time.

    I made a commitment to our local chapter that I would finish this stand so I could display my clock as part of our spring Regional that just ended today. The time pressure was just what I needed to sweep aside all other detours and focus on the stand.

    Here it is as displayed:

    DSC_1625.JPG

    In the next view, you can see the Microset timer on the right front leg. I planned to incorporate an adjustable bracket into the stand to hold the timer about 3 feet from the floor, but there just was not enough time. (no pun intended!)

    DSC_1626a.JPG

    DSC_1627.JPG

    At the end of the day, just before laying the case & stand down for loading on a cart, I took this shot from the rear to get a complete view of the entire shape:

    DSC_1628.JPG

    The stand feels quite rigid so I am pretty sure that it will allow the Microset to give more consistent information than what I can obtain with my rubber house.

    :cyclops:

    I still will make the bracket I mentioned and weld in a thick adapter plate at the top. Then not only will it work for this clock, but also with the heavy cast mount for my next generation movements.

    Oh yeah,................ I also have to find a solid floor for it back home.

    :whistle:
     
  17. Allan Wolff

    Allan Wolff Super Moderator
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    Re: Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.

    Jim,
    Beautiful work as always! It looks like it should be really stable. Is it made from aluminum?
    Thanks for sharing,
    Allan
     
  18. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.

    Hi Allan,

    Thank you for the kind words!

    The stand is all aluminum. Once setup at the Regional, the clock ran with the minimum weight w/o any settling in period. This leads me to believe that it is indeed stable.

    My evil plan is to eventually make an airtight Lexan box that will be mounted to this stand. It will allow me to mount various movements for whatever testing I might come up with, including vacuum testing.

    Should the legs or central column amplify ground or building vibration, I plan to pour in an expanding plastic such as Styrofoam to stiffen the walls.

    I'll just wait and see if that is necessary.

    Before someone asks - I did not bend the rectangular tubing for the legs and cross member.

    When I was thinking of a design for a stand, I thought the Eiffel Tower shape would be nice looking and also rigid. So I went to a local metal recycling yard to have a look around and found the four curved tubes that I used. The people at the yard said they get a lot of these curved tubes.

    Once back in my shop, I found a part number and name stamped into one of the tubes.

    The name was 'Buick".

    What a surprise for me!

    These are from the front, and maybe rear, of cars and support the plastic bumpers. I guess they are also part of the energy absorbing systems in the event of a collision.

    In order to live up to my Edison quote below I sometimes have to use a pile of junk from someone else!

    :screwball:
     
  19. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.

    Hi Everyone,

    As I was reviewing this thread, I just noticed that I never showed the finished spring barrels that Angela and I made for the music box I mentioned previously.

    Sooooo.... at the risk of hijacking my own thread (as if I hadn't already) :whistle: here are two views. These show that the teeth are now engaging quite a bit farther then originally. I mentioned that I was trying for this in the YouTube video (link in post 111):

    DSC_1394a.JPG

    DSC_1390a.JPG

    I am sure that the purists will not like my use of a stainless steel button head screw for the Geneva stops. This was never to be a museum style restoration. It had been so badly damaged from prior 'repairs' that I felt fine taking a few liberties.
     
  20. Tom Barosso

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    Re: Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.

    Hi Jim-

    Just curious if you've thought of incorporating any vibration dampening to your stand? Some discussion of dampening methods in relation to a machine base is here if anyone is interested:

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general/machine-frame-dampening-170046/

    Your thread on this clock that started back in 2011 continues to be an inspiration for me as I think about building a regulator myself. Thanks.

    Tom
     
  21. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: Demonstration of the effects of engaging friction.

    Hi Tom,

    Thanks so much for the link. I chased down the two books mentioned and they are on the way to me.

    Because I still intend to build some type isolated, fairly massive testing foundation (starting with the rubber mounts I showed earlier) I might be able to keep ground vibrations from entering this stand in the first place.

    This would leave resonant vibrations initiated by the clock mechanism itself.

    The legs all have an internal gusset along their length as seen here during construction. These might help diminish the tendency of the legs to act as a speaker and amplify vibration:

    DSC_0153a.JPG

    I suspect that if I do find a problem, it will be with the large central tube.

    Hopefully the books that are coming will shed some light on this and I am anxious to see if my design is valid w/other experiences.

    So, thanks again for the link, and for the comment about your being inspired by my efforts - that is as good as it gets!

    :thumb:

    Your timing could not have been better. We just had a full day of sustained 60 MPH winds with higher gusts and we lost some of the roof over an addition. So, I am in emergency mode once again!

    I needed the boost!
     
  22. jhe.1973

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    #122 jhe.1973, Mar 27, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2017
    No........... I didn't die or fall off the earth.

    Hi Everyone,

    Sooooooo, that is what I claimed I was going to do and now another year has flown by. YIKES!

    We just hosted our regional this last weekend and I was determined to 'finish' this stand. Here it is when I unloaded it yesterday after we came back home:

    DSC_2030a.jpg

    This is to show the bracket for the laptop & MicroSet. My shop is VERY crowded, lighting is less than ideal so this was the best I could do before we left for the weekend:

    DSC_2028a.JPG

    Here is a detail view to show the adjustable clamping arrangement that is padded to prevent scratches to the frame:

    DSC_2032a.jpg

    This shot shows how I incorporated the thick plate I mentioned last year. I decided against welding because I am pretty sure that my junkyard curved tubes are 2024 aluminum which is not recommended for welding. I had a huge amount of trouble welding it last year and I am now holding my breath hoping it will stay stuck together:

    DSC_2033a.jpg

    Here I show how the 3/4 inch thick gussets were jacked into place against the sides after being driven down the tube into place:

    DSC_1981a.JPG

    Not as solid as welding, but with all the surface area of so may flat head screws, I felt it was the best I could do.

    I learned an interesting lesson at the regional.

    My first order of business upon arriving at 6:00 AM was to set the clock up. It ran well until rather late in the afternoon when it lost a noticeable amount of power. The clock was in the same location as this shot from last year:

    DSC_1626a.JPG

    I usually have the pointer on the pendulum shaft just clear the beat plate. The afternoon sun was streaming in through another set of windows above the ones visible in the photo. The aluminum absorbed enough light/heat to distort the stand and the pointer started touching the beat plate very slightly at maximum swing to the right. A bit more extension to the rear adjusters shown below and the problem was solved!

    DSC_2030b.jpg

    P.S. I'm still looking for a solid floor at home.:mallethead:
     
  23. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Almost forgot...........I added this too

    Hi Everyone,

    Back in post #107 I mentioned that the infrared pickup for the MicroSet will move due to my flexible house. I have wanted to mount it differently anyway 'cuz I didn't like the alligator clip method.

    Here is the new mount:

    DSC_2024a.JPG

    A second surprise that I encountered this weekend was that when the afternoon sunlight got to the clock, the beam was not being reliably broken due to ambient light. When I shielded the side window of the cabinet it was OK. Another thing for my to do list - - make light shield for the pickup.

    While I was at all of this, I FINALLY followed through with what I wanted to do with this engraved plate that I have had for the last 3 or 4 years:

    DSC_2022a.JPG
     
  24. John MacArthur

    John MacArthur Registered User
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    Re: Almost forgot...........I added this too

    That's a pretty snazzy stand Jim.
    Johnny
     
  25. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: Almost forgot...........I added this too

    Hi Johnny,

    Thanks for checking in and offering your view. It means a lot!

    :thumb:
     
  26. Tinker Dwight

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    Re: Almost forgot...........I added this too

    A while back we had a clock that looked to have been a one of creation.
    It was a really nice wood movement with chime tubes.
    I'd mentioned that I thought it was a project of love.
    Some didn't understand that.
    I should have remembered your project.
    Really supper!
    Tinker Dwight
     
  27. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: Almost forgot...........I added this too

    Hi Tinker,

    Thanks for the support.

    I've just spent a bunch of time searching old computers for an e-mail I remember I received from you. Found it but I can't find a response from me. Do you still have the same hotmail account?

    I never intended to let this go so long. Several computer failures, system upgrades etc. since. The last upgrade (Win7) meant all my emails from Outlook Express are useless. I found a program where I can view them, but I just can't find the time to transfer them over to my present computer.

    AAARRRRGH!

    There, I feel much better now.

    :screwball:
     
  28. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

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    Re: Almost forgot...........I added this too

    I know what you mean about computers failing.
    Things always take longer, even when you compensate
    for the additional time you expect it to take.
    That is somebodies rule but I forget who's.
    I still have the hotmail.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  29. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
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    Re: Almost forgot...........I added this too


    Perhaps Murphy's law?
     
  30. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: Almost forgot...........I added this too

    Hi Harold,

    I think you are right about Murphy's law.....................hmmmmm maybe my last name should be Murphy?

    :chuckling:
     
  31. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    In case any are interested..............

    Hi Everyone,

    These photos are to illustrate that it sometimes is necessary to think way outside the box. If you don't have a machine large enough to fit a part there are ways to extend the capacity:

    DSC_1982a.JPG

    The stand is fastened to a sub-plate and the opposite end of the table is counter weighted to provide some balance. I used a torque wrench on the table screw to keep from fooling myself as I added weights. When adding weight, the table would get easier to move until it started to get harder. Then the last weight added was removed.

    Because I had to move the stand several times as I changed operations, I was using this hydraulic table. It then occurred to me to try to keep this table in place and allow it to roll as I cranked the machine table:

    DSC_2014a.JPG

    This worked great and I could forget the counter weights. There is a white plastic foam packing pad under the stand and it flexes to compensate for floor irregularities.

    Probably no one else is deranged enough to go to this extreme, but I wanted to show what is possible to reach beyond standard practices.
     
  32. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    Hi, Jim. How much do you figure it all weighs, clock and stand together?
     
  33. Tinker Dwight

    Tinker Dwight Registered User

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    Re: Almost forgot...........I added this too

    It is a corollary to Murphy's law but it has another name.
    Tinker Dwight
     
  34. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    #134 jhe.1973, Mar 29, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2017
    Re: Almost forgot...........I added this too

    Jim's life.

    :whistle:
     
  35. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    #135 jhe.1973, Mar 29, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2017
    Re: In case any are interested..............


    Shucks, I meant to weigh the clock when we got back and I forgot. Really, honest!

    It's now back on the wall so it will have to wait.

    The stand alone weighs 108 pounds, the pendulum 28 (IIRC) driving weight is 6, so I will guess total is in the ballpark of 200 pounds.
     
  36. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: This is how I intend to develop my second version..............

    Hi Everyone,

    I moved things around in my shop today to make some room.

    So, I decided to take these photos to show how I will be mounting my next generation movement for testing and completion. Only once I have everything as I want it, I will build the case. Until then I will be making a polycarbonate box that will be mounted first. Anything I happen to be testing will be inside of it.

    First these studs are tightened about 1 1/8 inch deep:

    DSC_2034a.JPG

    The other large stud pattern is for the day I intend to play with an upside down movement and eliminate the bridge for the escape wheel. The two smaller holes are for my current clock already viewed.

    Next, the cast iron mount:

    DSC_2035a.JPG

    Then the movement:

    DSC_2036a.JPG

    These bosses will go through whatever test box or cabinet I use so the movement is solidly bolted to the stand and wall eventually:

    DSC_2037a.JPG

    Just another view - I like this side best:

    DSC_2038a.JPG

    We live in a VERY dusty area. Keeping it out is why I first thought about some type of enclosure. The plastic box will also be used for vacuum testing at times. I would prefer glass, but it is too dangerous w/high vacuums.
     
  37. harold bain

    harold bain Forums Administrator
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    So, when you transport it, is the case and the stand taken as two separate items, or is the case attached to the stand for moving? I guess it is a two man job, regardless.
     
  38. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    #138 jhe.1973, Mar 29, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2017
    Re: In case any are interested..............

    The clock stays fastened to the stand for transporting. Last year I loaded it alone so it is do-able. Because it is so tall, it can be tipped back and into our Dodge Caravan. Then just the one end has to be lifted and slid the rest of the way in. I pack the pendulum & weight separately and fasten the movement/dial assembly back in place. I also roll up a small amount of packing foam and squeeze it under the escape arbor bridge so all the weight of the movement isn't on the screws in to the lower posts. Unloading is the reverse.

    This year I had help loading 'cuz the clock is 5 inches higher on the stand & I wasn't too sure about tipping it down in my crowded shop (low ceiling). I will probably ask for help again. Sure made the job easier.

    Unloading/loading at the regional Angela helped me so be careful of saying its a two 'man' job.........although when she worked at a furniture store her nickname was 'Mangela', so I guess you are OK!

    :chuckling:

    When we got back from the regional I unloaded it by myself, but took the door off the clock, then the clock from the stand to just move the bare case.

    Guess I'm getting tired of playing gorilla --- or tired from playing gorilla!

    :exhausted:
     
  39. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    Hi Everyone,

    One of our retired chapter members (Mike) was a professional photographer. He is in charge of taking photos at our regional each year. Recently he sent me a few shots he took in 2016 & 2017.

    I thought I'd post these two from 2016 'cuz of the human interest angle, plus I thought they are cute.

    In this view, you can see the clerestory windows I mentioned earlier that gave me some trouble in the afternoon.
     
  40. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    Apparently something has changed and I am unable to place photos within the text so I am doing it this way.

    In view two this young man had spent enough time interested in the clock that Mike was able to move around and take more shots:
     
  41. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    In the last photo of post #122 I forgot to point out one of the changes I made. The adjustable feet are shorter/stiffer with a ball welded to them for a better bearing with any uneveness in the floor.

    View attachment 349212
     
  42. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    Since my adding the ball. I have deepened the socket and added three screws to each pad to retain it when I move the stand. Sorry for the cell phone shot, but I was pressed for time getting ready for the NAWCC Craft Competition:

    View attachment 349215
     
  43. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    #143 jhe.1973, Jul 6, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2017
    Re: In case any are interested..............

    Hi Everyone,

    Since post #138 I did a major rearranging of a large portion of my shop to gain some desperately needed floor space. This was partly for building a way to load & unload my clock & stand alone if necessary.

    I modified a Harbor Freight appliance hand truck using leftover parts from two treadmills I scrounged for the DC motors. The casters fold up like a gurney and the unit drops to one of the treadmill rollers to lift & roll everything into the van. Here it is ready to load at the end of the national. It is now a one gorilla job:

    View attachment 349218

    :screwball:
     
  44. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    Oh yeah.................................... Here it is in the Craft Competition. The stand received a first place in the Horological Tools category and the clock a third in Experimental Timepiece Design:
     
  45. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    Here is a bit better shot of the clock/stand and less of the display. On the first day, the clock would not run on its six pound weight that is plenty at home. Luckily I brought the test weight shell w/8 pounds of lead shot. This worked fine and in the morning of the second day I was able to put the smaller weight on. I am pretty sure that this was because of the carpet the stand had to settle into. When I display this at out regional, it runs right away with the smaller weight, but we have ceramic tile on the concrete slab.
     
  46. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    During my rush to get ready for the national, the clock cabinet slipped off of a table in my shop and this is what happened:

    View attachment 349225

    I was VERY fortunate that the glue for the cornice separated quite cleanly so re-gluing was all that was needed. Could have been SO much worse. No broken glass which would have ended any thoughts of making the trip.

    I have no idea of why some posts let me format type and photos and some place the grey shaded area w/thumbnails. I am doing them all exactly the same.
     
  47. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    I FINALLY polished a few things that either had tarnished through the years or in some cases had never been shined up.

    View attachment 349226
     
  48. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    Most of these items had been machined well but because, as I have mentioned, this clock is a guinea pig, I did not pay attention to spit and polish.
     
  49. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    Here is an overall view of the new routing for the MicroSet wires:
     
  50. jhe.1973

    jhe.1973 Registered User
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    Re: In case any are interested..............

    I made several small brass clamps as shown:
     
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