Ornate Kundo standard

AndyDWA

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Dec 26, 2013
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It's been a while since I've posted much of anything but I have been busy :)

I picked up this clock (and a few more) last month and got it running a couple of weeks ago. It's a late-model, narrow-plate Kundo standard. Probably plate 1380, featuring a clip-on suspension guard. The crown (pediment?) is either plastic or very lightweight metal. It actually lets the clock down a bit as the finials aren't even round. But, hey, it's pretty nice otherwise.

It was loaded with oil and had a bit of grime in the movement but was otherwise in pretty good nick. I dismantled it, cleaned it up, fitted a new wire and it was off and running.

The photos show it before I cleaned it, so you can see it was not in much need of polishing. There was some residual polish in crevices on the pillars and base and to deal with this I tried something new. I "smeared" the parts with carnauba wax and scrubbed gently with a soft toothbrush. The idea was to soften the old dry polish and replace it with fresh wax. I wiped off most of the wax, let it dry, then buffed it with another toothbrush. I repeated the process until I was happy all the old white, dry polish was gone, and finished by buffing with a clean dry cloth. I think it worked well.

There appears to be bushes in the plates, which is bizarre for a clock so young. Were bushes ever factory-fitted or am I seeing things?

Thoughts on age? I'm thinking 1970s.

Thanks as always.


kundo-ornate-sansdome.jpg kundo-ornate-base.jpg kundo-ornate-backplate.jpg kundo-ornate-bushes.jpg
 

sjaffe

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Dec 25, 2012
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Hi Andy,
I've found that wax often is solvent based, so when you use new wax over old, the solvent may be helping to clean up the old wax. You might get the same results simply using solvent such as mineral spirits (paint thinner) before the final waxing. It is possible this may clean up the old wax better. Just speculating on this.
Stan
 

daveR

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Just a quick thought Andy. You refer to "dry white polish" Particularly for a clock of this more recent vintage, are you sure that it wasn't left over Brasso? It is the old staple for cleaning brass and if not cleaned off properly leaves a characteristic whitish powder in the crevices.
David
 

daveR

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Just re reading your thread, I see that you were working on the old polish with the toothbrush. I may have jumped in too quickly!
David
 

AndyDWA

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Dec 26, 2013
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@Stan. Yes, I've generally used lighter fluid (naptha, white gas, etc) in the past but by using pure carnauba (it's supposed to be 100%), I can work in the lounge room rather than in the shed. I've been using volatile solvents for most of the last 30 years for one thing or another, and I'm starting to not enjoy the smell of them any more.

I have also recently tried using methylated spirits (denatured alcohol) with 0000 steel wool on heavily tarnished parts. This seems to do a decent job of removing old lacquer ready for polishing with metal polish. The alcohol has a more tolerable odour (for me) than acetone, which I've used before. And again, I can get away with using the alcohol indoors as I use tiny amounts and the smell barely travels.

I'm no expert so I make no recommendations on any of this.

@Dave. Yes, I suspect it was just the residue of something like Brasso.
 

gleber

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Hi Andy,

I have the same clock. I only have this photo right now.

primary.jpg

I'm glad for this thread for the tips to help me keep it nice and shiny. I was worried about how to polish it with all the intricate details.

I got mine at a garage sale in a not working state. The suspension spring was twirled tighter than a tightly wrung out wash rag.

I don't think my clock has any bushings, but will check in the morning.

Tom
 

John Hubby

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Andy, good job and the toothbrush treatment is an excellent way to go when dealing with intricate cast parts and patterns. I've not done it directly with wax but have applied the wax after cleaning using a soft toothbrush.

This clock model was made in three "iterations" that I've seen at least on the full size version. The first was an all-metal clock including the base, support columns, dial, and pediment. The second was the one it appears you may have with a metal base and support columns but the dial and pediment were plastic. The third was "all plastic", of which I've only seen one.

The same basic design was also found as a miniature model, which I've seen only two versions. First had all metal parts and second with a metal base and columns, plastic dial and pediment.

I think these were intended to compete with the Kern rococo models but were never at all close to the Kern designs either in elegance or finish.
 

AndyDWA

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There's one on "that auction site" at the moment which looks almost identical but has rounded finials, so I assume it is the all-metal version.
 

gleber

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I checked for bushings on my clock and didn't find any on the back plate, but there is something going on on the front plate. The dial is held on by studs that are twist locked and I'm afraid they will break, so I didn't take it off. But, here is a picture from the back side. You can see something around the anchor pivot. I'm not sure if it's a bushing or just milled surface?

20160528_195501.jpg

Also, it looks like mine is a hybrid. The top ornament is plastic, and it looks like the front of the dial might be (the back is not), and the rest is brass.

Tom
 

AndyDWA

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I can't buy tiny spanners locally so I made a one out of sheet metal to handle those dial lugs. The trick is to turn the hex shaft between the dial and plate, not the lug itself. I think it takes a 4mm spanner, if you have one.

I've done a few and had no problem. If it feels too tight one way, try the other. Sometimes you can see which way to go because it's probably the shortest route. I don't think they're threaded into the dial, just a friction fit (I don't know this), so direction is possibly irrelevant.

The problem with not removing the dial is it's more difficult to clean the pivot holes and then to oil the pivots.

Thanks for checking for bushings. I'll assume someone before me wanted to try everything to get this one going.
 

gleber

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Thanks for that tip about turning the standoff instead of twisting the lug. I hadn't thought about doing it that way. Yeah, I think they are just milled flats on my clock. Your's definitely look like bushings.

Tom
 

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