• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Help Only single strikes from a Boston

Ron751

NAWCC Member
Sep 2, 2011
329
8
18
69
N. Massapequa, LI, NY
Country
Region
I just finished the arduous task of servicing a Boston Double barrel movement.
All the levers internal & external are moving freely. circled items are in pre-service position. It only strikes singles anytime..... if I manually move the rack, it will strike multiples.
 

kinsler33

Registered User
Aug 17, 2014
3,660
484
83
73
Lancaster, Ohio, USA
Country
Region
Please provide photographs of the clock works that live underneath the dial. I've never heard of such a clock, but they all have stuff in common.

Mark Kinsler
 

Mike Phelan

Registered User
Dec 17, 2003
9,872
26
48
West Yorkshire, England
Country
Region
Insufficient lift on warning lever and rack not dropping for the hour? Can't see your pictures.
 

Ron751

NAWCC Member
Sep 2, 2011
329
8
18
69
N. Massapequa, LI, NY
Country
Region
aaaa.jpg
Please provide photographs of the clock works that live underneath the dial. I've never heard of such a clock, but they all have stuff in common.

Mark Kinsler
Mark, the power is explained here > The barrels are piggy backed & wind w/ one arbor. It was a bear to re-assemble & I would never take it down again. I hope the pics enclosed help. The barrels both wind up fine.....Mine is a 3 plate model.


That is the more rare version of the tandem wind movement. I've got about 7 or 8 Boston clocks using the tandem wind system and only 2 of them have the 4 plate system like the one you showed, most have only 3 plates and don't come apart so easily. I don't know why they are different, or which was invented first but for some reason they have different types. One with 3 plates, and one with 4 plates. The 4 plate type is easily the best.


When I finally figured out how to separate the halves, its a pretty ingenious mechanism. You can work on one part, without disturbing the other. The strike section is totally separate from the time section.


Power is delivered to the trains thru the barrel teeth, not the arbor used for winding. Each barrel has its own arbor, which is hollow and which you can't see when the movement is together, though you can see the small ratchet-toothed clickwheel which turns with it as each mainspring is being wound. The winding arbor passes thru both barrel arbors and picks up one clickwheel in one direction, and the other in the other. With all this in mind, wind the clock and observe what turns in each direction, and you will quickly understand. There are 2 ways of winding this type of movement. You can turn the key back and forth, like winding a watch, or you can turn the key in one direction until one spring is fully wound, and then turn it in the other until the other spring is fully wound. The second method is better, since both mainsprings may not require the same amount of winding.
Unknown.jpeg IMG_0567.jpg IMG_0565.jpg IMG_0564.jpg IMG_0563.jpg
 

Ron751

NAWCC Member
Sep 2, 2011
329
8
18
69
N. Massapequa, LI, NY
Country
Region
View attachment 639397

Mark, the power is explained here > The barrels are piggy backed & wind w/ one arbor. It was a bear to re-assemble & I would never take it down again. I hope the pics enclosed help. The barrels both wind up fine.....Mine is a 3 plate model.


That is the more rare version of the tandem wind movement. I've got about 7 or 8 Boston clocks using the tandem wind system and only 2 of them have the 4 plate system like the one you showed, most have only 3 plates and don't come apart so easily. I don't know why they are different, or which was invented first but for some reason they have different types. One with 3 plates, and one with 4 plates. The 4 plate type is easily the best.


When I finally figured out how to separate the halves, its a pretty ingenious mechanism. You can work on one part, without disturbing the other. The strike section is totally separate from the time section.


Power is delivered to the trains thru the barrel teeth, not the arbor used for winding. Each barrel has its own arbor, which is hollow and which you can't see when the movement is together, though you can see the small ratchet-toothed clickwheel which turns with it as each mainspring is being wound. The winding arbor passes thru both barrel arbors and picks up one clickwheel in one direction, and the other in the other. With all this in mind, wind the clock and observe what turns in each direction, and you will quickly understand. There are 2 ways of winding this type of movement. You can turn the key back and forth, like winding a watch, or you can turn the key in one direction until one spring is fully wound, and then turn it in the other until the other spring is fully wound. The second method is better, since both mainsprings may not require the same amount of winding.
View attachment 639565 View attachment 639566 View attachment 639567 View attachment 639568 View attachment 639569
MORE PICS >

boston-11.jpg boston-9.jpg
 
Know Your NAWCC Forums Rules!
RULES & GUIDELINES

Find member

Forum statistics

Threads
163,536
Messages
1,421,046
Members
84,937
Latest member
daniel.hsu
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,857
Last edit
Aurora's 15 Ruby Jewel Movements by Greg Frauenhoff

514 Poplar Street
Columbia, PA 17512

Phone: 717-684-8261

Contact the Webmaster for perceived copyright infringement (DMCA Registration Number 1010287).

Copyright © National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors Inc (A 501c3 non-profit corporation). All Rights Reserved.

The NAWCC is dedicated to providing association services, promoting interest in and encouraging the collecting of clocks and watches including disseminating knowledge of the same.