One more...help identify

Discussion in 'Tower, Monumental & Street Clocks' started by Richard Westerman, May 20, 2019.

  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  1. Richard Westerman

    Richard Westerman Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    May 16, 2019
    2
    0
    1
    I picked this clock up from a dealer outside Budapest. They know nothing of it's origin. There are parts missing and some parts replaced. It's a small tower clock. About 21" long, 12" wide, 14" high.

    Ideally, I'd like to know which parts are original. Some I can tell based on wear and differences in metal.

    I need help with restoration if anyone has experience with this age clock.

    My main question at the moment involves the crown escapement wheel and pallet arbor. The arbor is offset about 1/2 inch from the center of the crown escapement wheel. The back arbor support is actually bent about 15 degrees to one side (facing clock to the right). See pic "Back 2". It had to be deliberate because it is forge hammered with two rivets. Furthermore, while I read that pallets should be offset approximately 90 degrees, pallets with that offset wouldn't clear the escapement tooth. FYI, the arbor looks original (forged) but the pallets are definitely replaced (welded). Any thoughts are appreciated.

    A haven't disassembled yet but I know there are some serious resistance issues.

    I have read anything I can find....which isn't much. Any help at all will be most appreciated.

    Back 5.jpg Back 2.jpg Right 3.jpg
     
  2. Kinpol

    Kinpol Registered User

    Aug 31, 2010
    176
    12
    18
    art and clocks conservator
    Poland
    Country Flag:
    It looks like made in the first half of XIX century...
     
  3. Richard Westerman

    Richard Westerman Registered User
    NAWCC Member

    May 16, 2019
    2
    0
    1
    Thank you. I believe the majority of wrought iron frames were phased out in favor of cast iron in late 18th century. It might not be apparent, but the frame is wrought iron. It is also an end to end train which suggests a date in the 17th century. My understanding was the verge with horizontal crown escapement (tooth wheel was replaced on mine) was only used for short time phased out by the late 17th century in favor of the recoil or anchor escapement. A great source of reference for these observations is from "The Evolution of Tower Clock Movements And Their Design Over the Past 1000 Years"; Mark Frank; Copyright 2013.
     

Share This Page