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Omega Seamaster cal.344 Repair Video - bumper automatic

Raynerd

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Apr 11, 2004
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Evening
im a hobby engineer and clockmaker. I've not serviced too many watches but this is by far the most valuable. It's my Omega Seamaster bumper auto and I took a 3 hour video to help me put it back together. Thankfully it worked out well and the watch, that has been sat in my draw dead for two years, is now back to life,

im all for constructive criticism... If you see anything I do wrong, let me know.

http://youtu.be/-GPsijz50LA

[video=youtube_share;-GPsijz50LA]http://youtu.be/-GPsijz50LA[/video]
 

Skutt50

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Mar 14, 2008
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I think you have a talent for this type of work. Nicely done if this is one of your first watches!

You don't show how you clean the parts, how you oil and how you adjust the watch. If you can find someone with a timing machine you might find out more about how successful you really were.

One thing I could recommend would be to use some rubber gloves when handling the parts specially after cleaning, to avoid fingerprints on the parts.
 

gmorse

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Jan 7, 2011
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Hi Ray,

A pretty brave thing to tackle this as a first good quality watch! The following are some thoughts that occured to me as I watched your video.

I'd add to Skutt's comment about finger protectors, (cots are probably more comfortable then full gloves), to say that they are better worn from the very start, when you're dismantling. Finger marks are better never made than have to remove them later.

It's helpful when dismantling to put associated parts in a compartmented box, especially keeping screws with their bridges, since they sometimes differ according to their position, especially in older watches.

You'll find that the seconds hand is much easier to remove if you just leave it to come away with the dial when you remove that.

I can't tell if your tweezers are steel, but when handling polished plates, brass or wooden tipped tweezers make scratching less likely, and similarly, a sharp piece of pegwood is kinder when moving clicks out of engagement, or moving train wheels!

Bent screwdrivers should not be used; too much risk of slipping, and using the correct size for the screw is important.

It's good practice to remove the balance before anything else, as it's the most fragile element in the movement.

It doesn't do tweezers any good to use them as levers to ease up bridges or cocks, use an old screwdriver that fits the slot underneath, (or is that how your screwdriver became bent in the first place?).

I assume that you didn't complete the dismantling and then clean and lubricate afterwards, or did that happen after the camera battery died? If you didn't, that could account for the poor balance amplitude, and could also lead to deterioration of pivots in the longer term.

Please don't think I'm being too critical, but I make these constructive comments in the cause of encouraging good practice in watch repair, especially for those just beginning on this journey.

Regards,

Graham
 

Dave T

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Good job!
I've got an Omega Seamaster 611 collecting dust on my bench due to a rusty case screw. Consequently I can't get the movement out of the case to work on it.
I'm going to try to disassemble the movement in the case, and hopefully be able to remove enough to get better access to that bad screw!
 

Raynerd

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Apr 11, 2004
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Manchester - UK
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I'd add to Skutt's comment about finger protectors, (cots are probably more comfortable then full gloves),
Thank you, I`ve now ordered 100 cots and will start to use these! I should have used them when I built and assembled my last clock I made instead of battling trying to polish off prints!

.
I can't tell if your tweezers are steel, but when handling polished plates, brass or wooden tipped tweezers make scratching less likely, and similarly, a sharp piece of pegwood is kinder when moving clicks out of engagement, or moving train wheels!
My tweezers are steel - I don`t actually own any brass tweezers and certainly not wooden tipped tweezers but I do have pegwood. I`ll keep an eye out for some brass tweezers as again it makes perfect sense!

Bent screwdrivers should not be used; too much risk of slipping, and using the correct size for the screw is important.
I very kind user on here sent me the set of tweezers many many years ago. It may be time to upgrade to a new set. I can`t see any branding on the tweezers I have and I am running out of blades.
If I was to purchase a new set, what would you or anyone else reading this recommend. I couldn`t afford the likes of Bergeon but I would buy something half decent.

It's helpful when dismantling to put associated parts in a compartmented box, especially keeping screws with their bridges, since they sometimes differ according to their position, especially in older watches.

It doesn't do tweezers any good to use them as levers to ease up bridges or cocks, use an old screwdriver that fits the slot underneath, (or is that how your screwdriver became bent in the first place?).
I don`t have a true compartment box but I have lots of little plastic pots (I work in a science lab) and I did segregate all the associated parts. I also have a glass covered storage dish which I use.
Good point about the tweezers but does it do the screwdrivers much good to leaver up parts - I suppose the blades are cheaper than a decent set of tweezers and so I`ll bear it in mind.


Please don't think I'm being too critical, but I make these constructive comments in the cause of encouraging good practice in watch repair, especially for those just beginning on this journey.
Not at all - if I didn`t want criticism to improve I wouldn`t have posted on a dedicated watch repair forum with masters far superior than my skills will ever be! I appreciate the time it has taken you to reply.

Thanks and if you do have any suggestions for screwdrivers please let me know.
Chris
 

DeweyC

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Feb 5, 2007
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I will echo Graham. I use bronze tweezers almost exclusively. Very easy to shape with a a file, good grip and non marking.

Also, clean your tools with naphtha or IPA before the first touch to cleaned parts and after the watch is cased. And do not forget your work surface.
 
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