Old wine in new bottle...fitted with Robin remontoir

Discussion in 'Clock Construction' started by carloclock, May 5, 2018.

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  1. carloclock

    carloclock Registered User

    Jul 15, 2009
    40
    1
    6
    Male
    retired
    Beautiful Liguria -Italy
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Hi All.
    The aim of this project was just to show to some fellows of mine how to build a clock with items recycled by an old clock.
    This was the starting point : a French movement in very bad condition


    IMG_3976.JPG

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    Dismantled the clock and having all the parts in my hand I realized that with two barrels ( which means a lot of available energy) I could build not just a very simple skeleton clock but something more complex: a clock fitted with Robin remontoir.

    To be precise I have already build entirely of my own a clock with lost beat escapement and Robin remontoir ( my # 54) , but now this is a complete different matter so, please, do not forget the starting purpose, the one to build a clock making use of all the available items of the old French movement.
    This is the result
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    I hope you enjoy it and possibly that this could stimulate someone to try something the like .


    All the best.

    Carlo
     
  2. tok-tokkie

    tok-tokkie Registered User

    Nov 25, 2010
    308
    1
    18
    Cape Town, South Africa
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    As always a interesting and very nicely executed clock.

    I made a Robin remontoire for the clock I made. It was added to the existing clock because the clock stopped intermittently & I had could not see what the problem was. I later found the cause of the clock stopping so the remontoire was not needed and had not sorted out the problem. But the remontoire did not work as I expected. I had to increase the drive weight significantly to be able to power the clock when it was fitted. That came as a surprise to me but after thinking about it I realised that the remontoire has to accept the energy the pendulum requires in a short period so the energy flow rate (power) needs to be increased. But even so the energy required by the pendulum has not changed so the change in drive was a surprise to me. My remontoire cycled every 6 seconds as it was directly before the escape wheel whereas yours seems to be on the minute arbor so cycling on a much longer period.

    My question is do the springs need winding much more frequently now that there is a remontoire then in the original clock? (I appreciate that the original clock was not working but you may know the previous and current gearing between the springs and escape and so the difference in time between windings.)
     
  3. carloclock

    carloclock Registered User

    Jul 15, 2009
    40
    1
    6
    Male
    retired
    Beautiful Liguria -Italy
    Country Flag:
    Region Flag:
    Thank you for your kind words

    My apologies, but I do not understand. The use of a remontoire in a "clock" is not a "need" but an addition to try to get better performances, not working order.

    Sorry but I must admit that for me it is not clear what you are speaking about.

    In this clock the time elapsed between one cycle and the next one is around 48 seconds. In my # 54 is around 60 seconds)

    Every French clock has a "default" winding time of one week but usually the winding time might even be 14-15 days and this should be the same for the clock I used for my project.

    I have realised that just one barrel is not enough to lift the driving weight and after 4 days ( when I stopped the clock to give it a quite reasonable finish) and when the lifting power was still strong , the two barrels needed each one just two complete winding turns to be full wound up . On this basis, now that the clock is in working order I expect at least one winding week ...but I'll be more precise later... :)

    All the best.
    Carlo
     

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