• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

Old grandfather clock case problem

jacobsthlm

Registered User
Apr 30, 2013
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As you can see the wood has made the case to tilt forward. It’s very unstable and when looking under there is no bottom plate and the bottom is not parallel to the floor. I guess there has been a piece there that fell of some time. The previous owner let a wire hold the case to the wall. I want a better solution. What can I do that don’t make the value go down? It’s a quality maker English clock from 1740...

Sorry for all the rest in the way, but you can see that it leans forward and has no bottom part. Those three white pads made it a little bit better...

Jacob

1729DBD0-6DD7-4F9A-B1BB-0A539EAA8D48.jpeg 93CA50E6-917D-4B1D-8E3E-5F88AF05F4E0.jpeg
 

novicetimekeeper

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Jul 26, 2015
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in 1740 it would not have had a bottom. This misalignment does happen, The whole construction was originally hide glue and pins so it will come apart for realignment.
 

jacobsthlm

Registered User
Apr 30, 2013
251
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18
60
Stockholm, SWEDEN
www.jacob.fotosidan.se
Country
in 1740 it would not have had a bottom. This misalignment does happen, The whole construction was originally hide glue and pins so it will come apart for realignment.
Okey. I think you are one I want to talk to about the clock itself. I searched for the maker and your name came up a couple of times. It’s a William Barnard, Newark clock, with the number 485. I have a issue but I guess I have to post again as this is not about the case any more....
 

jacobsthlm

Registered User
Apr 30, 2013
251
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60
Stockholm, SWEDEN
www.jacob.fotosidan.se
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novicetimekeeper

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Jul 26, 2015
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Yes I seen and red that and the other part he also wrote. I could count to 5 he found that was older then mine and 37 after mine, so mine must be rather old. Is Brian a member here as well?
I've never seen him on here, he has sold all his stock in a couple of Bonham's auctions and retired from trading as far as I'm aware.
 

FDelGreco

NAWCC Star Fellow
NAWCC Diamond Member
Aug 28, 2000
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According to Loomes (Watchmakers and Clockmakers of the World, 21st Century Edition), Barnard of Newark was born in 1707 and apprenticed in 1724. He died in 1785. He numbered some of his clocks on the dial and yours is in the right range. He numbered some of his earlier clocks on the back of the movement e.g., 248, but didn't sign his name on the dial.

Frank
 

EscapeWheel

Registered User
Mar 19, 2003
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I was under the impression that tall clock cases were purposely made to tilt forward. The idea was, the installer would add a shim under the front of the bottom which would straighten it and "lock" it against the wall to some degree.
 

novicetimekeeper

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Jul 26, 2015
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Longcase clocks were designed to be fixed to the wall. Look in the back, many look like they have been used for target practice. Floors in period properties tend to sink towards the middle so it isn't unusual to find that they need wedging at the front.
 
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