Okay, again not earth shattering...

Discussion in 'Wood Movement Clocks' started by rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jan 19, 2018.

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  1. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #1 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jan 19, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2018
    When I think of E & GW Bartholomew products, I think of their hollow columns:

    Bartholomew 9.JPG

    Or their wonderful relatively diminutive transition clocks:

    E. & G.W. Bartholomew.JPG

    Recently came across a E & GW Bartholomew ww shelf clock that had some features that were interesting.

    The case is mahogany and mahogany veneer veneer on pine.

    Bartholomew 1.JPG

    I thought that the price of admission was the splat:

    Bartholomew 2.JPG

    Yep, it has a shrinkage crack. Still wonderful.

    Note the odd configuration of the 1/2 columns as pictured above. Remind me of what might be seen on a triple decker.

    Rather unusual, IMCO.

    Note the "whales tails" on the upper and lower blocks

    Bartholomew 2.JPG

    Bartholomew 4.JPG

    One thing about the unusual columns. When I first saw the clock, I thought that the sections in chrome yellow were repainted. Nope. After careful examination, I am confident that it is original based upon the surface with very consistent fine alligatoring. Furthermore, that chrome yellow was VERY much a period color. I've owned boxes painted in the same paint. Here's a dressing table in similar and original paint buried under piles of stuff:

    Bartholomew 11.JPG

    And here it is used to decorate a Terry miniature ww (with the addition of smoke graining):

    Bartholomew 12.JPG

    So very much a color used in the period.

    Shakers used a chrome yellow, too.

    Here's the original wooden enameled raised gilt gesso dial:

    Bartholomew 5.JPG

    Yes, some losses and "stretch" marks. No. Will not restore. I think it's perfectly fine.

    Here's the label.

    Bartholomew 6.JPG

    I've been informed that I have exceeded my picture limit. See the next posting in this thread for more pix of interest.

    RM. Bartholomew 3.JPG
     
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  2. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I ran out of capacity.

    Here's the movement:

    Bartholomew 8.JPG

    I am confident it is original based upon the usual criteria. I will leave the taxonomy to others.

    Now, I feel obliged to include the absolutely superfluous!!!!

    I must admit with head hung low: I like high Victorian furniture. But not the typical. The likes of makers like the Merklen Brothers and especially Hunzinger. I recently posted a Hunzinger "lollipop" rocker. Tonight, I'm posting another piece of Hunzinger. This time one of his folding chairs. What makes this chair especially rare and desirable (IMCO) is that it survives in the ORIGINAL 1870's upholstery and fringe:

    Hunzinger folding 1.JPG Hunzinger 2 folding.JPG Hunzinger 3 folding.JPG

    Very rare to do so!!

    Here's a virtually identical chair with original but, IMCO, less interesting original upholstery in the collection of the Brooklyn (NY) Museum:

    Brooklyn Museum

    This chair can also be found in their exhibit catalog, "The Furniture of George Hunzinger: Invention and Innovation in the 19th Century". See pages 10, plate 2 and page. 47, figure 31.

    IMCO, a rare survivor of museum quality.

    RM
     
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  3. David 62

    David 62 Registered User
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    Love the Americana.Original tablets,dials smoke graining and so on.
     
  4. PatH

    PatH Registered User
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    Wonderful clock and VERY nice signed Hunzinger! I've seen clocks with a similar color on the columns, and assumed it was actually a base coat for another finish - perhaps tortoiseshell or gilding. I'd never considered that it was the finished color. As you said, the splat is definitely worth the admission!

    As for the Hunzinger, are his folding chairs as comfortable as the rockers? And the superfluous... a cabinet card with what appears to be a Hunzinger prop. I collect vintage photos of people wearing watches. Although it's questionable whether the subject here is wearing a watch or a locket, I couldn't resist the chair - or the fact that the children seem to be holding still with assistance from posing stands.

    img137.jpg
     
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  5. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    RM, wonderful stuff! If I came across a clock like the one you are telling us about, it would be earth shattering to me! And PatH, I, too thought that the yellow was often a base or undercoat for the faux tortoise shell columns. However, in the case of RM's clock, I believe it is too early to have originally been a faux tortoise shell component. Lastly, in PatH's charming cabinet card, does it seem to anyone else that the standing boy might possibly have his shoes on the wrong feet? I think the look on the children's faces are strangely compelling to me...

    Best to all,

    George N.
     
  6. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #6 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Jan 20, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2018
    First, something went wrong with that link to example of the chair in the Brooklyn Museum Collection. Try this:

    Brooklyn Museum

    Thanks for your kind comments.

    Thanks for your kind comments.

    I'll never say never, but after close examination, I am fairly comfortable with the assertion that the yellow was the final treatment. I have also seen this color used on clock columns where it was given fine horizontal striations so it resembled tiger maple or figured birch. I've also see it given a dappled effect to resemble bird's eye. Finally, the configuration of the turnings on these 1/2 columns is one I can't recall seeing before. Like 2 upper halves with a spool in between.

    I too believe that that chair in the photo is a Hunzinger.

    RE: the comfort of the folding chair. The pattern you see on the back and seat is not printed, it is embroidered. Note also that the original rope turned gimp (albeit loose in areas) and the fringe (compare them both to the ones on the chair in your period photo: the same!). By the way, the cloth in relatively unexposed areas retains it's original color, a rather vibrant and surprising kelly green. So much for the notion of those "drab" Victorians

    What I feel truly sets this chair apart from other examples I have seen in person and in museums is the largely intact original upholstery. A rare survival, but fragile. SO, I am reluctant to sit in it. I've seen people sit on original period upholstery with less than good outcomes.

    One other comment about the wonderful period photo you shared. You mentioned the use of a posing stand which can be seen behind the standing boy. Though hopefully not in this case (those 2 look pretty lively), they were used for post mortem photos as well. I've seen some amazingly "alive" looking dead subjects posed in a variety of ways including standing upright with the use of those stands. Often they were posed with others, both alive and dead, hugging, holding hands, etc. Sadly, infant and child mortality occurred at stunning rates in those times. The little ones were often taken by diseases that we can now immunize children against (why would people choose not to immunize their children in the face of the overwhelming SCIENTIFIC evidence of their benefit) or rather common conditions now treatable with antibiotics. Often a postmortem portrait, painted and later on, photographed, was the only keepsake that a family might have. And families wanted to remember them as they were in life.

    Thanks for your kind comments.

    Had to chuckle about your comment about the boy's shoes! They do look reversed. Early on, shoes were not made as right and left, only becoming so after a period of wear. So, new shoes could be rather uncomfortable. Kids often went barefoot.

    RM
     
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  7. David 62

    David 62 Registered User
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    Does your Terry,Jr.miniature have original glass?
     
  8. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Unfortunately, no.

    RM
     
  9. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    RM,

    Once again, I've learned more about clocks and other tidbits of history from you, and I'm very grateful! I did not know that in the early days, shore were not designated left or right. A big surprise for me. Thanks!

    George N.
     
  10. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Take it from someone with two left feet!

    RM
     
  11. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    One more comment about the period photo. Note that the left foot of the seated boy is blurred. My understanding is that people had to be still for a bit while being photographed due to the lengthier exposure times. He probably fidgeted, moving his foot. So he was most likely alive when the picture was taken.

    RM
     
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  12. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    RM,

    Sadly, I had a roommate in my college days who collected post mortem photographs. The amount of dead children in his collection was both staggering and sad. Many times the mother would be holding the obviously dead infant. Times were hard in "the good old days"...

    George N.
     
  13. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I've been offered pediatric post mortem photographs, including dag's, ambrotypes and cabinet cards. They can be quite valuable and saleable. I won't buy them.

    That said, the tradition seems to have continued at least up to the past few decades and maybe it still does. I remember when I was a resident (now that's about a million years ago now) and an infant was taken off of life support in the NICU. What happened with a certain frequency was that all of the tubes, connections to machinery and such were removed. Then the baby was wrapped in a receiving blanket and held by the mom as she rocked it in a rocking chair with the dad and sometimes with the family around. By the way, this occurred in a private side room. Sometimes they did request that a polaroid (no iPhones or digital) be taken with the mom holding the baby (really couldn't see the baby due to the swaddling).

    When I lived on the S. Shore (now that's > than 20 years ago) I had wonderful neighbors. They were both well educated modern people, he a lawyer, she a teacher. Their first child had Potter's Syndrome. The lungs never developed and it had severe malformations. The baby died almost immediately after birth. They had basically a postmortem photo of her (you really couldn't tell it was). It was kept on a special table called "nana's table". It was a Victorian marble top table passed down through the family. On it were numerous family pix, both of the here and gone. They handled it in such a wonderful way. Their 2 boys knew that they had a sister. Nothing morbid nor at all creepy or strange.

    RM
     
  14. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    I know we're way off topic here, but I have to comment further. Here in the South, it is still quite common to have pictures of a deceased child even today. In fact, many funeral homes have special rooms for such procedures. I recently attended a funeral of a full term stillborn infant. The entire family and a lot of the friends attending had their picture taken while holding the poor little soul. He was swaddled, but his head and face were fully visible. After the funeral, all of the attendees were invited to the parents house, where the baby was on display in a basinet, just as if he was sleeping. The parents, unable to deal with their grief, kept the baby with them at the home for more than two weeks. I had nightmares for several nights after that experience.

    I just last week visited with the parents who lost the child, and, in their home on the living room wall was a very large picture of the mother with the baby, taken at the funeral. Being born and mostly raised on the west coast, this practice was completely foreign to me. I was horrified at the funeral, and quite disturbed when visiting the parents at their home, both on the day of the funeral and after they finally buried the child. The whole thing seemed completely normal to most everybody else, but, to be honest, I'm still somewhat horrified by the whole thing. Having a constant reminder of such a painful and sad situation is something I cannot get a grip on. My wife, who was born and raised in west Tennessee, was not at all bothered by the situation, and told me how common it was down here.

    Best to all,

    George N.
     
  15. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Google images for the “catacombs of Palermo” or a similar phrase. But make sure the lights are on & it’s not too close to bed time.

    And with that, let’s put this to rest... pun intended.

    RM
     
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  16. George Nelson

    George Nelson Registered User
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    Creepy indeed!

    George N.
     
  17. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    Takes my learning to a new level. great examples!

    Ron
     
  18. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for your kind comment.

    I may not always try to be agreeable, but I do try not to be too boring.

    RM
     

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