Oh gee whiz...

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Feb 1, 2014.

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  1. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    ...another oversized ogee!

    As we remain in the unrelenting icy grip of both the polar vortex and DMBH, thought I would post this clock as what will probably prove to be an effectual response to one of them.

    The case is contrasting well figured bird's eye maple (plainer maple used for the sides) bordered in contrasting straight grained mahogany. Dig that ogee cornice and chunky base. To me evocative of the 1830's and 1840's.

    I've posted pix with a standard sized ogee to give some sense of the size and proportions.

    The case weighs a ton and has some very non-CT construction features. The mahogany edging is not mitered at the corners. Instead it is butted. Same thing on the cornice top Horace Dexter I posted a while ago. The door frame is not pine, but a hardwood. I think it might be cherry? The upper glass and mirror are old and wavy. Yes, I really like the degraded silvering on the mirror and won't touch it. At first, I thought the glazing points indicated replacements. I'm not so sure. There is NO evidence of any other arrangement, i.e., putty, evidence of retaining strips, glue blocks, nails, etc, etc. The back board is one rather thick hand planed board. Everything bespeaks construction techniques and nails from the period.

    The inner backboard demonstrates no evidence that there was ever any kind of label.

    The dial is white painted wood with hand painted polychrome floral spandrel decoration. The hands are mismatched.

    The unsigned weight driven time and strike movement is interesting. It is strap brass with solid great wheels. At first glance, it looks like an early movement by S.B. Terry. See Roberts, "The Contributions of Joseph Ives, etc", page 187, figures 94A and 94B.

    Not so fast.

    See Oechsle and Boyce, "An Empire in Time, etc", pages 80-84 and especially figure 146. From about 1835-1837, Marshall and Adams and then E.W. Adams of Seneca Fall, NYS produced 2 versions of a strap brass weight driven movement which the authors describe as knock-offs. The most common was based upon one produced in CT by Joseph Ives. The other and much less common was produced in CT by S.B. Terry. The movement in this clock I believe is the latter. When found, it is more often in later clocks labeled by E.W. Adams alone (1836-1837). Sometimes his label is pasted over one by Marshall and Adams.

    I was surprised to find turned wooden winding drums in the movement in my clock. See the pix. Is this typical? They don't look like replacements or alterations. They don't look like adaptations to change an 8 day clock to a 30 hour one.

    Was this clock by Marshall and Adams or E.W. Adams? I'm not sure. The movement is. This is not one of their typical case styles and they labeled their clocks. However, on line, I did find 2 examples of "bevel cased" mirror clocks by E.W. Adams. No pix of the movements were provided in either instance. They were labeled. Also, not a dial typical for that firm based upon what I found. They seem to have usually been gilt raised gesso decorated rather than polychromed.

    Interestingly, a competitor, Philip Smith of Marcellus, NYS made ogees with cornice tops and blocky bases housing his version of a strap brass weight movement. See Oechsle and Boyce, page 117, figure 203.

    I say a NYS clock in a locally made Empire case with the Marshall & Adams/ E.W. Adams version of the S.B. Terry strap brass movement. By those firms? Bought and cased by someone else? I have no absolutely no doubt that case, movement, dial, etc all very much started life together.

    I have much to learn, especially about NYS clocks. Love to hear thoughts and comments.

    RM
     

    Attached Files:

  2. harold bain

    harold bain Registered User
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    Wow, nice clock RM. Everything about it is unusual. Birdseye maple is always eyecatching and the grain in yours is excellent. Too bad there isn't a label, but it looks like you've done a good job of sleuthing it's origins.
     
  3. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks Harold!

    RM
     
  4. bajaddict

    bajaddict Registered User
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    What a beautiful clock! And the ogee used for size-comparison purposes is no slouch either :thumb:
     
  5. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thank you for your kind comments.

    The standard sized ogee is by Jerome.

    RM
     
  6. Jerome collector

    Jerome collector Registered User
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    That's certainly a stunning clock. The combination of veneers puts it at the pinnacle of ogee cases. However, I have to confess the cornice doesn't do a thing for me. In fact, it feels out of place for the simple, boxy nature of the ogee. It seems out of balance to me. Taking liberties with RM's photo, I wondered if my opinion would change if things were turned upside-down. See below. I think the cornice does better as a base. You be the judge.

    No offense intended to the maker or to RM (whose collection of the unusual is truly amazing).

    Mike
    IMG_5631-revised.jpg
     
  7. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    #7 rmarkowitz1_cee4a1, Feb 2, 2014
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 20, 2018
    LOL!:D

    What can I say. One man's cornice is another man's base.

    Frankly, it's what I find so appealing about rural "Empire" furniture.

    The best the country has to offer from this period, IMHO, sometimes sports interesting combinations of veneer, e.g., mahogany and a figured light wood like bird's eye maple or use of bold decorative/grain painting or outrageous proportions or all 3. Sometimes just over the top. These features can be found in VT and Upstate NYS furniture, OH, etc.

    Sometimes it's not for the faint of heart.

    RM

    IMG_8845.jpg http://fiskbarnantiques.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/DSC06396.jpg
     
  8. klokwiz

    klokwiz Registered User
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    RM,

    spectacular case. Quite interesting movement, I especially like the wooden spools.

    Joe
     
  9. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    Thanks for your kind comments.

    I wasn't aware these movement had wooden winding arbours.

    Any additional info?

    RM
     
  10. klokwiz

    klokwiz Registered User
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    RM,

    I have not seen wood winding spools on these before. I assume it is a means of reducing the need for brass in the manufacture. i figured you could tell me more about it. all the brass movement clocks i have have brass spools. It looks like this clock has steel arbors with brass ends and gear with wooden center spool. Interesting design. If you take down the movement it would be nice to see some close-ups of these.

    Joe.
     
  11. rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

    rmarkowitz1_cee4a1 Registered User
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    I agree.

    I have a wooden works with white metal winding drums by Jeromes and Darrow.

    Eli Terry, Jr. converted 8 day weight driven brass works to a 30 hour by adding big wooden winding spools.

    Jerome did that with 8 day wooden works.

    Don't think that's what is happening here, though.

    RM
     

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