OG CLOCK

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Cuckoojohnboy, Mar 26, 2020.

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  1. Cuckoojohnboy

    Cuckoojohnboy Registered User

    Feb 28, 2011
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    Hi -

    I have been working on several of many stashes of clocks that I have these days. I was waiting until I had some spare time to fix. Well being home-bound for the next few weeks is the perfect time!

    I have this OG clock that I am working on at the moment. Two questions:

    1. It has ribbon instead of string for the weights. Was this original to the clock or a replacement?. I've repaired several of these and each one I've worked on had string not ribbon.

    2. The clock was held together on the posts with wire shaped in a "s" form. Is it better to replace these as they were or are steel pins ok?

    Thanks much all!
    John

    OG Clock 2.jpg OG Clock.jpg
     
  2. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    never seen ribbon before... lose it. certainly not original.

    there's no way it will always wind as evenly on the take-up spool as evenly as braided nylon cord and i wouldn't trust it.
     
  3. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Sep 4, 2008
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    Yes, the ribbon is certainly not original and should be replaced with cord. The S-shaped pieces of wire may or may not be original. I would replace them with tapered pins. Much easier to remove and put back when servicing the clock.

    Uhralt
     
  4. R. Croswell

    R. Croswell Registered User

    Apr 4, 2006
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    Agree, lose the ribbon. I use tapered pins and generally if the posts are steel I use brass pins. If the posts are brass use steel pins. That helps to keep the pins from becoming frozen in the posts

    RC
     
  5. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    I like the "S" wires probably better than pins, mainly because they don't stress anything and never fall out. It's the only thing I use on motion works post, exterior minute hand drive clutches and winding arbor chain wheel retainers.

    You do need to make sure they are made of the right size wire.

    Willie X
     
  6. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    For motion works I use them too. Sometimes the pressure applied by the tapered pin causes undesirable friction here.

    Uhralt
     
  7. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    The "S" keeps the wire from slipping out. Easy to replace them with new wire if needed.
    Be sure to check the condition of the upper pulleys too. They wear out in the centers and rob power.
     
  8. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Jun 14, 2008
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    Taper pins in posts, or in later movements nuts on threaded post ends, or screws, all are used to clamp plates tightly together. This provides structural integrity to the assembly. That is not provided using wire as it exerts no clamping force, it just limits movement. Motion works posts and other posts for levers and the like s bent wire is absolutely the way to go.
     
  9. DanGrayson

    DanGrayson Registered User
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    May 19, 2012
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    Do you think the freezing would come from corrosion? I asked a chemist friend about corrosion and got these replies:

    "Brass and stainless steels can be compatible, but sometimes can corrode. Depends somewhat on the type of brass and the type of steel (which determines the anodic potential difference), and the environmental conditions (humidity and presence of electrolytes). Brass and steel are fairly close in the galvanic series, so corrosion tends to be less of a problem. "

    And what about the comparison with brass against brass?

    "Because the anodic potentials are the same, there won't be any corrosion just due to the contact.

    It's not clear to me why there would be an advantage to using steel pins with brass posts and vice versa. Maybe the different thermal expansion coefficients causes the two parts to flex over time, and this leads to a looser seal?"
     
  10. Jim DuBois

    Jim DuBois Registered User
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    Let me suggest that theory and practicality are two different things. Either brass or steel taper pins are fine in either brass or steel posts. It doesn't matter long term or short term. We have used iron/steel on steel and brass on brass in clocks and brass on iron/steel for at least 700 years and any example I am aware of has not suffered specifically from any of those combinations. Immerse them in saltwater or let Duncan Swish do his thing, you may get some undesirable reaction, but that is more likely on joints of dissimilar metals than it is on similar metals.

    Short of using wire or tooth picks, taper pins of whatever metal are not rocket science. And not to worry. And we don't have a lot of stainless steel in our clocks these days.
     
  11. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    It's not a compatibility issue. Steel and copper alloys corrode and oxidize just fine on there own.

    When some Bozo comes along and dips an 'all up' movement in water base cleaner, that's a big problem starter.

    Living in a high humidity area can also cause problems. If you are speaking of old clocks, many of them have spent decades in basements, barns, atics,
    or under a house in direct contact with mother earth. I'm working on one now that has termite damage.

    Willie X
     
  12. Cuckoojohnboy

    Cuckoojohnboy Registered User

    Feb 28, 2011
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    Does anyone have a secret to making the "s" wires. Is there a secret?

    Thanks,
    JOHN
     
  13. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

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    I cut a length of wire about 1" long and make a right angle bend at about the 1/3 point on the wire. Then push the long end into the hole and make a second (less sharp) bend. You can push down and tighten the ends as you wish using common flat nose pliers. Leaving the less sharp second bend lets you straighten it and reuse the little buggers when necessary.

    Willie X
     
  14. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    My understanding of brass on brass or steel on steel is that over time the metals exchange electrons and sort of weld themselves together. Sometimes that natural bonding is pretty stubborn.
     

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