Ofrei metal detector for watch parts?

Discussion in 'Watch Repair' started by Chris Radek, Apr 16, 2018.

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  1. Chris Radek

    Chris Radek Registered User
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    Apr 13, 2014
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    Have any of you tried the metal detector Otto Frei sells? I see it's sold by other sites as a treasure-hunting device, so I wondered if anyone here has tried it on actual watch parts.

    A while back I had to hunt for a stainless steel screw, so my usual magnet didn't work. I found it, but it was frustrating.

    This device says it works on non-ferrous materials too. But can it really detect something so small? It seems too good to be true.
     
  2. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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  3. Whereisitat

    Whereisitat Registered User

    Mar 14, 2017
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    I think I can answer this one.....

    Whereisitat? is a nod to the nature of watch parts.

    But I also metal detect as a hobby and have a fair amount of time & success. There is one-and one only-handheld pinpointer that I would use for metal detecting. That is the Garret carrot & they got for about $140.00 luckily I've had mine so long I forget.

    The problem is the cheap ones don't last & sensitivity is lacking etc..

    For truly small parts-say wristwatch size screws I'd try something else like area preparation & a floor that is bare & clean. Or lots of spares & that's the way I went.

    A metal detector on the floor will pick up screws, studs joiners & even staples. That is UNDER the floor so not much help if the lost part lands in such a area. And my pro pointer is limited to about a BB size and it has to be almost touching a certain area on the tip to respond.

    In the soil & larger objects a whole different game and a very useful tool. But I'd pass for watch parts unless you had a floor built without any metal under the work area-kinda rare.
     
  4. Chris Radek

    Chris Radek Registered User
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    Apr 13, 2014
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    I appreciate you sharing your experience. Sounds like not a panacea. Right now my floor actually doesn't have metal under it, but that may change soon. I'd like to try one, but I bet saving my $100 is the right thing to do. You are sure right that the real fix is a flat and very plainly colored floor (and duct tape or similar at the edge of all furniture)
     
  5. RL

    RL Registered User
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    Mar 28, 2004
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    For parts on the floor---a vacuum cleaner with a piece of nylon (hose or panty hose) stretched over the nozzle works really well.
    The vac will find the part--pick it up and hold it against the nylon for you to retrieve.
     
  6. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    Attachment of a bib or apron to the bench usually catches most of what may fall towards the floor.
     
  7. RL

    RL Registered User
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    I have a pull out apron with my bench---for some reason my parts never fall in it--lol.
    Guess it's a good thing I don't have much time (and good eye sight) to work with the watches much.these days.
     
  8. RJSoftware

    RJSoftware Registered User

    Apr 15, 2005
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    i have a sorting system when ever i clean up the shop floor. My shop is like a small cubical with swivel chair in middle. When I sweep i have a series of wire screens that the sweep pile goes into. I get down on the knees to sweep and use small hand held brush. A regular broom will tear up some parts. There is usually a hair ball or two. if parts get stuck in them and i cant get them with magnet then they are toast. I tried burning hair balls but it really stinks too much bother. After sorting the sand in progressivley finer dust piles i just bag them in spare plastic grocery bags. i am deliberately slow on tossing them out as the work involved in replacing the part can far exceed careful checking and rechecking.
     

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