Not this problem again!

Ticktocktime100

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Nov 11, 2012
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Hi,
I am a TOTAL sucker for cuckoo clocks and, of course, when this one showed up at a flea market yesterday for only 3 bucks, how could I resist? It only came with one weight, but it's in super condition. There are two things wrong with it. One: the time train chain has come off the sprockets. Two (this is what is really annoying me): as you can see in photo three, there seems to be the residue of some awful brown glue, used to keep the bellows in place. It certainly worked! So the big question is, how can I get the bellows out without damaging the case or the bellows, if that is at all possible. Thank you as always for any help you can offer on this promising project!
Regards.
 

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shutterbug

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You can try heating it to soften the glue, but you'll likely have to cut it out. Get a real thin piece of steel and sharpen the lead edge. Tap that into the glue until it breaks free.
 

Tinker Dwight

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Oct 11, 2010
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Do try heating first. Many of these newer clocks are assembled
from some type of hot glue.
Look carefully for a nail or screw. They'd need to be removed
first.
Reinstall with a small brad and screw for the next guy.
Tinker Dwight
 

Bob Reichel

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My favorite tool for this problem is an artists pallet knife and warming it also would be my suggestion. Be sure the screw is out. The locating nail will have to fend for itself as the bellows is released from the case. I use a heat gun a lot for heat.
 

Randy Beckett

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You can try heating it to soften the glue, but you'll likely have to cut it out. Get a real thin piece of steel and sharpen the lead edge. Tap that into the glue until it breaks free.
A very thin blade stainless kitchen knife works well for this. Just place it in the glue joint and tap it down. A popular brand here in the States I use for this kind of work is RADA.
 

Chris

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You won't like my answer, but I normally break them out with a screwdriver. It will rip the first layer of luan plywood off the inside of the clock a bit, but it easily sets in place with no visible exterior damage to the case. I don't glue them back in; I use a wood screw and nail like the more typical setup you see.
 

bangster

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Listen to Chris. Just pry it off, and expect to leave a bit of wood somewhere. Won't hurt nothin' when it comes to reassembly

NEVER ATTACH A CUCKOO BELLOWS TO A CASE USING GLUE!!!!! Nail & screw.
 

harold bain

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Listen to Chris. Just pry it off, and expect to leave a bit of wood somewhere. Won't hurt nothin' when it comes to reassembly

NEVER ATTACH A CUCKOO BELLOWS TO A CASE USING GLUE!!!!! Nail & screw.
I've run into this about half a dozen times. It's a factory job. Never any screw or nail holes in the case. I suspect the attitude at the factory was that it's not built to be repaired. I always use the wood that broke away with the bellows whistle to line up the assembly, then drill a screw and nail hole with a very small drill, and attach it as it should have been done at the factory.
 

Ticktocktime100

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Nov 11, 2012
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Bob, Randy, Chris, Bangster, Harold, thank you all for these great suggestions. I don't have a heat gun, so I may try heating a knife blade to melt the glue and if that doesn't work, I will just pry the bellows off. Thanks again!
Regards.
 

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