Not a clock, but......................

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by doc_fields, Dec 4, 2019.

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  1. doc_fields

    doc_fields Registered User

    Sep 29, 2004
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    Hi all,

    I picked up a nice brass teapot made in the Netherlands. Since we all pretty well deal with and work with brass, I was wondering if someone might have an idea if there are any coatings or finish used for something made of brass that would take the heat of the stove. Because when I used a spot of Simichrome on it to see if this coating would come off, it did, just a little, but that's all. I tried denatured alcohol and acetone, but no to no avail.

    Would any of you across the pond have any idea how to deal with this?

    I hope the moderators would let this stay here, even though it isn't clock related. As I said, since we all deal pretty much in brass, I thought the wider audience here could help.

    Much appreciated!....................................gary
     
  2. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    I'm not quite sure what you are trying to achieve. Do you want to protect the brass from being tarnished when used on a stove or do you want to remove tarnish that occurred in the past when the teapot was used on a stove?

    Uhralt
     
  3. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

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    Ditto. Not sure what you are trying to do but brass doesn't seem to be the ideal substance for a teapot. No matter what you seal it with, it will quickly tarnish or burn if used for that purpose.I would think that it would be strictly a decorative piece. Pretty sure the brass would impart a distinctively foul taste to your tea.
     
  4. doc_fields

    doc_fields Registered User

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    Was just wanting to spiff (shine) it up a bit for the lady of the house. As far as being brass for a teapot, there's both brass and copper on ebay for sale. It has had a former home and just shows the normal wear and tear of that sort of thing.

    I'll probably just leave it like it is then. Thank you guys!.................................gary
     
  5. JTD

    JTD Registered User

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    If you want to shine it up, and if it is made of brass, there is no reason why you can't. Used Simichrome and 0000 steel wool and a lot of elbow-grease and it should look fine. Then you could either lacquer it or use a conservator's polish such as Renaissance.

    But it would be very helpful to see a photo of the kettle. Without it we are just working in the dark.

    JTD
     
  6. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    That's what I would use too. As a pre-clean you could put it into a bowl with an ammoniated cleaner and let it soak for a while.

    Uhralt
     
  7. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

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    Bras so is a good cleaner for brass and will even remove old compromised lacquer. Then for a nice deep glow, simichrome. Is my recommendation. Have fun.
     
  8. doc_fields

    doc_fields Registered User

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    Yes, I did use Simichrome as I mentioned above. I'm on a trip out West at this time, so I can't give you a pic, but will try to remember when I return in a week. It's an interesting teapot,to me, to say the least. Thanks!.................gary
     
  9. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Hi Gary,

    Perhaps a daft question from over here, but why would you put a teapot on the stove? When we make tea, the pot is warmed first with a little boiling water from the kettle, then the tea is put in the pot and the hot water added. After it's brewed for a short while, pour and enjoy. The pot never goes on the stove . . .

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  10. doc_fields

    doc_fields Registered User

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    Hi Graham;

    Is there a difference between a kettle and a teapot? Maybe I have things backward from how you folks do it there. What I describe as a teapot (sorry no picture yet, I'm on a trip out west) is roughly about a fourth the size of our kettles. We heat water in the kettle, place a teabag in a cup, and pour water from the kettle into the cup with teabag. As I understand you, the water is heated in the kettle, poured into the smaller teapot, which then serves the water to a teacup? I may be semantically wrong in what I call teapots and kettles? Willing to be corrected.........................gary

    Post Script: I can definitely understand then why a teapot never goes onto the stove because of its smaller size. A gas flame would be difficult to adjust around a teapot.
     
  11. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

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    A teapot is as you describe. Simply a receptacle to draw or infuse the real tea one puts in the pot. It is again then used to dispense the tisane into cups for drinking from. A kettle is a larger container in which water is boiled on stovetops or campfires yes.

    Nobody in their right mind would drink tea from a brass teapot unless it had been electroplated with silver beforehand.
    My guess is that it is an ornamental teapot.
     
  12. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

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    Yes as we would say here, "tastes a bit chook don't you think?" Chook being our word for chicken or fowl.
     
  13. peanuts

    peanuts Registered User

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    If you take your tea with milk, my belief is that the tea should be made in a teapot, which is then poured into a cup/mug into which you have already added milk. This prevents the milk from being scalded, which can have a detrimental effect on the taste. There's even an international standard that covers this practice! ISO 3103 - Wikipedia
     
  14. bangster

    bangster Moderator
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    Tea KETTLE is placed on the stove to boil water within. TeaPOT has the tea placed into it, then water from the teaKETTLE is added to make the tea, which is then poured into the teaCUP. From which it is sipped. I hope that clears everything up. TeaPOT is often ceramic (China). TeaKETTLE never is, so far as I know. I think it would break.

    I've never seen a brass teaPOT. I've seen copper teaKETTLEs, coated with tin (not silver) on the inside.
     
  15. JTD

    JTD Registered User

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    Bangster has got it exactly right.

    JTD
     
  16. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Agreed.

    Uhralt
     
  17. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

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    Generally the tea is that goes into the teapot is loose tea and is somewhat coarser than what would be in a teabag. Teabags are a later contrivance that most of us this side of the pond use for one cup convenience.
    I once knew an Irish lady who used to read tea leaves.
    See what you started Gary?
     
  18. doc_fields

    doc_fields Registered User

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    Well, I'll 'fess up, but we've all, I believe, had a bit of fun and learned something, especially me.

    I plan to be home late tomorrow or early Tuesday, and will take some pics as promised. Thanks to all!..................gary

    Post Script: I promise I won't go off topic on my next posting. (even though I also have a Russian Samovar........)
     

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