Non magnetic watch of america

musicguy

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This is a Swiss product, and I can move it to the
European section if you do not get an answer here
by a knowledgeable collector.


Rob
 

Tom McIntyre

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The Swiss examples were made by the Non Magnetic Watch Co. of Geneva which had a very complete line of complications and high grade watches.

Later they were made by Peoria and smaller quantities from Illinois and others. The two companies in America that "owned the name" at the end had some interesting battles in the courtroom also.
 

Kent

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The Swiss examples were made by the Non Magnetic Watch Co. of Geneva which had a very complete line of complications and high grade watches.

Later they were made by Peoria and smaller quantities from Illinois and others. The two companies in America that "owned the name" at the end had some interesting battles in the courtroom also.
Our Message Board software used to automatically create a link to our Encyclopedia articles when the title first appeared in a message text. Later "improvements" eliminated this feature, forcing people to enter the appropriate code to create the link.

You may also find the following Encyclopedia article helpful Non-Magnetic Watch Co.
 
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Nathan Moore

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This model was produced for the Non-Magnetic Watch Company by the Badollet factory in Geneva, Switzerland (Jean-Jacques Badollet). They are designated as "Model 1" in original American material catalogs.



The plate design for this model was patented by Charles Willis Ward in 1888. (He also patented the plate design of the Aeby model at the same time). Ward served as a key figure in managing production and "bridging" the logistical gap between the factories in Switzerland with the market in the United States.




The Non-Magnetic Watch Co. offered various grades in this model. Your watch appears to be the 18-Jewel Grade No. 72, described in advertisements as:

"Fine Nickel Movement; 18 fine Ruby Jewels in gold settings; Centre Jeweled; Exposed Pallets; Double Roller Escapement; Escape Wheel Cap Jeweled; Adjusted to Temperature, Isochronism and four positions; Patent Regulator."

The No. 72 was one of the finer grades sold by the company, behind the No. 71 (20 Jewels) and the No. 100 Extra (essentially the No. 71 that was personally adjusted by Alexis Favre and came with an official certificate of adjustment). There were finer watches with complications, but those were largely sold in Europe during the early development of the company. Your watch falls within a batch of other known No. 72 movements, and interestingly, during a transition in the marking style (notably characterized by the style of the "A" in "America.")




Thomas Edison famously endorsed the Non-Magnetic watches while working with large electromagnetic dynamos during the rise of electricity. You may be interested in reading through this detailed article series on the Non-Magnetic Watch Company I started last year for more information:



I also have attached an advertisement with Edison's endorsement, published in the 1893 Marshall Fields catalog for reference. Hope this helps!

NonMagenticWatches-MarshallField1893.jpg
 

Orlovsky

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This model was produced for the Non-Magnetic Watch Company by the Badollet factory in Geneva, Switzerland (Jean-Jacques Badollet). They are designated as "Model 1" in original American material catalogs.



The plate design for this model was patented by Charles Willis Ward in 1888. (He also patented the plate design of the Aeby model at the same time). Ward served as a key figure in managing production and "bridging" the logistical gap between the factories in Switzerland with the market in the United States.




The Non-Magnetic Watch Co. offered various grades in this model. Your watch appears to be the 18-Jewel Grade No. 72, described in advertisements as:

"Fine Nickel Movement; 18 fine Ruby Jewels in gold settings; Centre Jeweled; Exposed Pallets; Double Roller Escapement; Escape Wheel Cap Jeweled; Adjusted to Temperature, Isochronism and four positions; Patent Regulator."

The No. 72 was one of the finer grades sold by the company, behind the No. 71 (20 Jewels) and the No. 100 Extra (essentially the No. 71 that was personally adjusted by Alexis Favre and came with an official certificate of adjustment). There were finer watches with complications, but those were largely sold in Europe during the early development of the company. Your watch falls within a batch of other known No. 72 movements, and interestingly, during a transition in the marking style (notably characterized by the style of the "A" in "America.")




Thomas Edison famously endorsed the Non-Magnetic watches while working with large electromagnetic dynamos during the rise of electricity. You may be interested in reading through this detailed article series on the Non-Magnetic Watch Company I started last year for more information:



I also have attached an advertisement with Edison's endorsement, published in the 1893 Marshall Fields catalog for reference. Hope this helps!

View attachment 721140
Big thanks to Nathan Moor for this full information. I am living in Israel. And I'm looking for someone whu can repair this watch. May be you have some information about it? Good day
 

Ethan Lipsig

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According to Eugene Fuller, The Non-Magnetic Watch Company: A Chronology, Bulletin of the N.A.W.C.C., Vol. 32/3, No. 266, June 1990, p. 236:

In the years 1885-1886 Charles-Auguste Paillard (1840-1895) invented the new 'non-magnetic alloy' (palladium with copper) to produce non-magnetic and non-corrosive hairsprings and attracted the attention of the young Dresden businessman Charles W. Ward. He and his colleagues were impressed by the invention and decided to set up a company to manufacture watches on the basis of Paillard's patents registered in Great Britain (No. 6367 of 11 May 1886 for 'nonmagnetique hairsprings'). Ward entered into preliminary agreements with Paillard, a former supervisor of Patek Philippe & Co., and Louis Bornand, a former manager of Henry Capt & Co. in Geneva to obtain rights on the Paillard patents. On 23 February 1886 the first order was placed for 34 watches, including twelve pocket watches with complications. On 16 March 1886 a new agreement was signed and the company's name changed to 'Geneva Non-Magnetic Watch Co.' Paillard and Bornand were responsible for the production in New York. Paillard's agency was located at Rue Kleberg 2 in Geneva and the Bornand factory at Grand Quai 64 in Geneva (former Tiffany factory, as Jeweler Circular reported in 1889). The office of Non-Magnetic Watch Co. was located at Quai du Mont Blanc 5. In 1886 the company registered the patent rights for the manufacturing of palladium spirals in France, England, Germany and the United States because Dufane-Lutz had also started manufacturing palladium spirals in Geneva. In 1887 a new contract was signed with J.-J. Badollet in Geneva and Aeby & Co. in Biel, watchmakers for the manufacturing of raw movements. In the same year it was agreed with Patek Philippe & Co. that the raw parts would be manufactured in the Patek Philippe factory and finished by Bornand. These were probably the highest qualities of Non-Magnetic Watch Co. . . . According to Adin Mathews, the Jewelers Weekly of July 8, 1891 attributes the 16-size watches marked Non-Magnetic Watch Co. of America to Aeby & Co. and to J. J. Badollet & Co., and the like-marked complicated pieces to Audemars Piquet & Co., August Baud, and Louis Bornard, among others all Swiss makers.
 

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