No free lunch in horology...

Discussion in 'American Pocket Watches' started by Lorne, Oct 5, 2012.

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  1. Lorne

    Lorne Registered User

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    I am a collector (lower case "c"). While I would love a collection of Waltham Crescent Streets, I have the bank account for Bond Streets.

    Over the past year I've bought two Crescent Streets; both needed work so I got them for a lower price.

    My 1908 I've spoken of before. While it looked to have minor issues upon closer inspection it needed extensive work. I think the only original part left is the click screw. At the end of the day I don't think I saved much by getting a fixer upper.

    Now there is my 1883 Crescent Street. My repair guy says even its shadow needs to be fixed. If it weren't for the demasking pattern I'd skip the damn thing over a lake like a rock and call myself lucky when it sunk.

    Lesson learned: Inexpensive is expensive...
     
  2. John Cote

    John Cote Director
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    Great post. There are "deals" to be found out there but in general they are found out in the wild and you have to have the watch in your hand and the knowledge in your brain to know a deal. I have a watchmaker friend who told me the other day that he is thinking of asking whether a watch was purchased on eBay before agreeing to fix it. He has a core of eBay buyers who give him a lot of work but that lately the watches they get are so messed up that the work isn't worth it.
     
  3. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    Yep, buying a watch online sight unseen when the seller says "I'm sure it's just a simple fix" is a big red flag. If it was simple to fix, they'd have already had it done so that they could get top dollar for it instead.
     
  4. Greg Frauenhoff

    Greg Frauenhoff Registered User
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    John,

    I disagree just a tiny bit. Like gold, a deal is where you find it. Over the last 15 years of buying (and selling) on eBay (which ain't "out in the wild" ) I've made some wonderful buys. We won't talk about my "mistakes" if that's ok.

    Greg
     
  5. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    I buy from the same sellers and i dont buy Ebay watches too often.many times the descriptions are not accurate and when i ask a question the seller is defensive.I prefer to just buy from the same sellers and no big surprises that way.
    But yes, there are no free lunches.
     
  6. ben_hutcherson

    ben_hutcherson Registered User
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    Greg said it best!

    With that said, if I'm outlaying serious cash(i.e. retail price), I do generally buy from a seller I trust whether it's on Ebay or on other sources. A "watches added" email from Fred Hansen is generally cause for me to drop everything I'm doing to go view his site :)

    Just to agree with Greg's comment-here's my best Ebay purchase of the year(this item was the seller's first ever Ebay listing)

    41.jpg
     
  7. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    Of course you can get deals if you're both careful and lucky, but buyer beware!
     
  8. Daniel W.

    Daniel W. Registered User

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    Ben if you don't mind me asking. Who made that case? I have one in 18K and the MFG stamp doesn't exist. Also, Is that small button crown unique to any particular case or just a different design used by many?
     
  9. John Cote

    John Cote Director
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    Greg,

    I didn't mean to be as absolute about eBay. I have bought some great watches on eBay too. I do prefer to hold a watch in my hand before buying and even then I have made mistakes. Again, wherever you buy, the percentage of good buys is going to depend on your level of knowledge and your ability to make educated judgements.
     
  10. ben_hutcherson

    ben_hutcherson Registered User
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    This one is marked MB for Margot Brothers. It is 18k also.

    There is no crown in this case, as it is a keywind case. That particular style of pusher is ubiquitous on gold and silver cases both from this general time period.
     
  11. pmwas

    pmwas Registered User

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    I generally don't like buying watches thet need to be fixed, especially if they're not running. The additional costs are very big sometimes. However, sometimes sellers simply don't care - they sell the watch as is and eventually it turns out fine when it arrives, just in need of minor repairs. But still - how can you tell? There are some details you cen see in the photos or description, that make you feel the watch might be good or not, but never for sure. What I think is that when you buy from reputable sellers, you pay a lot of money for watches in fine condition and hunting for bargains you'll end up spending as much money for a lot of damaged watches, among which some will be very fine to restore, and the rest is simply no good. That's why I've learned to prefer the first way, but still, buying a cheap, damaged watch to see if it can be restored is sometimes irresistible... and in many cases turns out to be a big mistake :)
     
  12. Daniel W.

    Daniel W. Registered User

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    Sorry about that Ben. I didn't know the correct name for the "pusher". My watch is also key wind with a P.S. Bartlett movement that I ask about in another thread just a day or so ago.
    Thanks for the reply and information.
     
  13. BILL KAPP

    BILL KAPP Registered User

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    Buyer beware is good advice, no matter where you are shopping.

    One of the good things about ebay is "45,902 results found in pocket watches" . No free lunch but with a few keywords you save a lot of gas and time to see a lot of watches.


    One of the bad things about ebay is that when you win , you know that you just paid x dollars more than anyone else in the world was willing to pay:)

    happy hunting
     
  14. pmwas

    pmwas Registered User

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    Oh... you don't know how bad it gets, when I add up the price, the shipping to Poland and then exchange it to Polish Zloty. It often hurts a lot... Of course, it depends on how badly I want the watch. When it's a watch I want badly, when it turns out more than I thought it's, well, just a slight inconvenience, but sometimes... you know. recently I bought (accidentally a bit I admit) a very early Springfield Watch with foru digit s/n from 1875, but 7j, low grade... the price looked very good until I've realised how much I really have to pay ;). But... only too often it turns out very well in the end - it's condition is far from perfect, but it's complete, running and visually all right, so I'll see what I can do to make it a fine piece again - I hope I'll succeed. I don't like (what I foolishly noticed after i placed my bid tempted by the S/N) the traces of super glue holding the hairspring stud! But - such things usually can be corrected. And that's another thing about the 'free lunch' as you call it... Watch the pictures carefully and seek for as many downsides as tou can find. They will all be annoying eventually and it takes a fine watch to really tolerate major flaws. The rest of these damaged ones I've eventually sold, most cheaper than I bought them ;)
    Simply, I think it happens to every colector at times - you see just waht you're looking for and you see what you, subconciously, want to see - later, after it arrives, you notice a damage, chech the pic's and... it was there already ;) !!!
     
  15. skippp66

    skippp66 Registered User
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    Sorry guys, but I beg to differ. If there is a watch I want, I am prepared to deal with any and all sellers. The ebay/PayPal guarantee is very valuable to the buyer and I have used it occasionally to return the item and get my money back. It goes without saying that one must be cautious and do one's homework. Collecting watches, like any other new endeavor, involves a learning process. We all fell down a few times before we learned to walk. Having said that, there are certain sellers I would much rather deal with: Fred Hanson (father and son), Jim Haney, Glen Ellington, Terry Fox, Glen Brown, Larry Crutzinger and several others to name a few, are as fair and honest as they come
    Skip, that Hamilton Nut
     
  16. richiec

    richiec Registered User
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    Well, just to add to the mess, I have made some really great purchases on Ebay, a few where the watch was out of action from mishandling and easily fixed. Of course there are the flyers I have taken. Mostly I buy Walthams because I have a fairly large collection of parts and lots of earlier mistakes which can be used for parts. I deal with a local antique shop, picked up some good deals there and also got burnt. Got an all original 1892 Vanguard for under $150, gold filled, no hairlines in the dial, no wearthrough on the case, then I jumped on a Keystone Howard before looking it up and got burnt. It looks great, runs great but I will never make my money back. I do repairs for her so I got an 18S Hampden movement for nothing, she had just scrapped the 14K case because she needed money. It needs a mainspring and lever spring, it is worn but will run again. I like the fun in the chase and it always gives me something to work on anyway.
     
  17. Phil7153

    Phil7153 Registered User

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    Don't forget your ability to haggle with the seller, as negotiations are key to getting great deals. You would be surprised at how much you can knock off just by asking.
     
  18. Vinetu

    Vinetu Registered User

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    How could you not love eBay?!? Such a vast selection of watches, parts, tools - anything you can think of, while not having to even leave the room.

    Granted I don't buy broken watches (except when I need an original part), if I were to buy one - I would never buy it from a seller who is a well-known watch trader/repairman. It's simple - if the watch was worth fixing - they would've fixed it themselves and turn bigger profit.

    You can do that on eBay too. Recently I submitted a "best offer" that was half the asking price and the seller accepted.
     
  19. pmwas

    pmwas Registered User

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    Yes - best offer is a great thing. I remember buying a rare Soviet sterling silver Pobeda from 1946 on original silver bracelet (might not mean anything to you here, but it's a rare watch and surely one of the finest pieces I have) for 1/3 of the initial price. The 'buy it now' price was obviously waaaay to high, but it shows how worth it is to haggle sometimes. on the other hand, there are sellers, who have a $500 buy it now price and won't go below $475... so what good the best offer option is then:???:
     
  20. Jerrell Petersen

    Jerrell Petersen Registered User

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    Some buyers use Best Offer as kind of an appraisal. It helps them get an idea of what people will pay. I have been frustrated in the past with sellers not budging. On the other hand, when a seller has a Buy it Now with out the best offer, I have just messaged them an offer (if the auction has existed for a long time with no buyers) and have been successful that way.
     
  21. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    I totally agree with Jerrell. Lots of eBay sellers that use 'Buy it Now' in conjunction with 'Best Offer' are using them as a tool to measure the market. They can accept an offer at any time they want if they really want to sell it. Others use only the 'Buy it Now' for what they hope it will go for, but they are not really being honest in trying to sell it. Usually I'll just buy at auction, best with no reserve. Those who use a reserve are just judging the market, like the 'Buy it Now'/'Best Offer' users. Those that aren't are the people who really want to sell an item instead of 'playing the market' with it, trying to squeeze out every dollar they can from it.

    This is one potential danger of using price guides like The Complete Guide. People are under the impression that because they have a working movement in a case they can ask the mint price for it (the third column) when realistically, they should be asking the market price for it (the first column), and even then only if it's all original. If a movement is in a replacement case, missing screws, all marked up, etc, it should be going for less.

    Now that just goes for sight unseen, seller unknown. It's still best to have an item in hand and inspect it if you can from a seller you know and trust, or at least can talk to and get to know a bit better...and even then I'd still try and talk them down before reaching for my wallet.
     
  22. Cymorill

    Cymorill Registered User

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    I prefer to think of it as snatching up something before everyone else realized what a great deal they were missing out on.

    And when there aren't good photos? I once bought a watch with a bad, poorly focused photograph from someone who clearly had no experiance with pocket watches, not even how to open the case to look at the movement. Got it cheap. Needs a new balance staff, but other than that it's is surprisingly good shape for a 1899 Waltham 16size 15 jewel watch. There's always the hope of finding a gem in the rough, fresh from the estate sale or some relative that couldn't care less. Hey, it's shiney and it looks old, so why not sell it as is? That's what I look for. I'll admit I've gotten some real duds, but it has the addiction of grab bags or the toy in the cereal box! My most prized wathc I bought for (what turned out to be) a low price from someone who said it was from the 50's (when I asked if that was 1850's or 1950's she laughed and said she didn't think they had watches in the 1950's!) and when I took it to my guy to get it running found out it was a very unusual movement not often seen in watches. Usually I won't buy a watch, working or not, unless I like the look of it and would like to see it sitting in my display case.

    There's no free lunch, that's for certain, but that lunch might come with an extra cookie just often enough to make it worth the gamble.
     
  23. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    But if it takes buying 6 lunches and finding that 5 are a cookie short just to find one that has an extra cookie, you're still short 4 cookies.
     
  24. Greg Frauenhoff

    Greg Frauenhoff Registered User
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    Just to add a different perspective, not all of my online auction "deals" have been cheapies. There's the 15 Ruby Jewel Aurora in original 14K case, the unsigned 3/4 plate New York Watch Co., etc. These weren't cheap but they were still "deals".
     
  25. Vinetu

    Vinetu Registered User

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    The only ebayer I've seen doing this on a constant basis is actually one of the co-authors :) Shows you that even the very latest Complete Guide is absolutely useless as far as prices are concerned. I often see his buy-it-now listings sandwiched between two NR auctions of better condition items and his asking price is often 3-4 times what the auctions end as a final price; total disconnect from reality.

    I agree, I have done that as well. I guess some people don't realize that eBay, like any other market place, is open for communication. Just because a seller is asking 200 it doesn't mean they won't take 80. And if they don't - good luck with the sell :)

    The same applies for those concerned about the condition of the watch. If the pictures are not good enough (they often are) - I will send a message to the seller. This way, if I can't see cracks on the dial and the seller tells me that there are no cracks - I can easily return the watch if it comes with cracked dial - I have the seller "on record".

    But in the end, the best advice for eBay is to bid your time :) A deal will always come, you just have to wait for it. Often the same exact watch will sell for nearly twice the price just a week later/earlier, even on NR auctions.
     
  26. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    It's true. I recently saw a pair of brand-new headphones that retail for $69 in-store, which sell for $49 on eBay all day long, go for $7 in a no-reserve auction.
     
  27. Dano4734

    Dano4734 Registered User

    I love ebay, I tend to buy the ones that need a lot of work. I seem to get all original that way and usually ones that someone has not screwed with because it was broken. I am pretty fortunate that one of my closest friends is a master watchmakers so I can do that. I showed some before and afters here. If I had to pay on ebay for the afters on some of the scarce Hamilton's I could never afford them. I end up with an incredible like new watch for a wonderful price. Not taking advantage of my friend either, I do one heck of a lot for him also.
     
  28. Cymorill

    Cymorill Registered User

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    Probably half of my watches, possibly more, are from ebay. My local flea markets have yet to yeild anything that wasn't outrageously over-priced or basically just scrap, and the local antique stores never seem to have much to offer. I've had some luck with a particualr pawn shop, but even those have gotten a little too pricey. I ebay gamble it is! And when you think of it like a gamble, and not spend more than you're will to lose, even that bad deals aren't so bad. I don't think I've ever bought a watch that was in good running condition; I prefer the beat-up cases (as long as the hinges are good) to the pristine, and the dials that have a few crack to show their age and wear; the ones that someone used everyday. For now I'll take ebay over any other venue I have open to me, but I'll still check elsewhere.
     
  29. dodothree

    dodothree Registered User

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    You just need to spend your time searching and biding. You can find a lot of good deals. I got a lot of good items with very reasonable prices on ebay. Also a lot of sour fruits too. You just need to know what a good price is. Spend a little more time studying the market will save you a lot of dollars.
    There are dishonest sellers. I will ask for refund if the loss is too much for me. It is kind of hunting experience and I really love it. I hope I can have the money to buy every day! It is really fun.
     
  30. nomorewatch

    nomorewatch Registered User

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    I can't agree more with you!
     
  31. bajaddict

    bajaddict Registered User
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    I have a general question for ebay wrist and pocket watch buyers: Do you buy from sellers that offer a return policy - or is it always "as-is" with no returns? Are they open to relaxation of their return policy and perhaps offer up shipping costs if it allows them to sell ?

    The reason that I ask..... and I do not want to make this sound like a "commercial"...... is that when I am confronted with a watch movement that is non-running or that I don't know the mechanical soundness of (which is all of the time, given my limited knowledge) I will offer a return policy with no conditions 'cept maybe postage. If it's another type of item that I know even less about (a saw sharpening vise comes to mind) I have communicated back & forth with the would-be bidder and the end result was that I told 'em that if he bought it and it was junk I'd return all his monies and let him keep the item. I sold something that I would not have otherwise, he bought it with assurance & we were both satisfied.

    To tell you the truth, he struck me as the "real deal" & I was just so jazzed that there is still someone out there sharpening his own saws that I was motivated to work with him :D And this was something that I could not add to the auction's list, for obvious reasons, as I would get taken left and right.

    When I buy on ebay, I always check feedback..... not so much for "negatives".... but to see if the seller and buyer left nasty (and often amusing) comments. HEY! Of course anyone can leave bad feedback for anyone, but if there is a multitude of the drama I tend to look elsewhere.

    I try to communicate any reservations that I might have before committing a bid & I have had my worries resolved or I have just moved to another item. This is just a hobby for me, of course...... and if I had to bring home the bacon on the backs of these deals I probably would not be able to afford this cavalier attitude.
     
  32. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    With ebay's buyer protection program, there is practically no such thing as 'as-is, no returns". Unless the item is very accurately described, there's almost always an honorable reason to authorize a refund on used items if one's not satisfied upon inspection. Besides that, a lot of buyers do consider returns even if 'no returns' is their policy, if asked nicely.
     
  33. pmwas

    pmwas Registered User

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    #33 pmwas, Oct 24, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
    Oh well... I've got the Springfield Mason watch today... well. It doesn't look good, but also not that bad at the same time.
    The case is Keystone silveroid, the earlier type with hinges on the sides. I don't know if it's original to the movement, maybe it could be. The movement is a Mason grade Springfield with a low four digit S/N 8041. Could be a nice watch, but the top plate is corroded and scratched. Also, there is a mark made by glue used by someone not smart eonugh to handle a watch to hold the stud (!!!)


    http://imageshack.us/a/img404/2760/dsc06735y.jpg

    http://imageshack.us/a/img268/373/dsc06733s.jpg

    Anyone has any objections? by far I didn't until I decided to oil the watch. On disassembly one can see a ince gear train:

    201.jpg with distinctive patent markings on the top plate's inside. All fine until...
    Aaaaargh... take a look :( :

    http://imageshack.us/a/img827/237/dsc06730n.jpg

    Now I'm... sad. I don't like suprises like that and it's not the first time, unfortunately. Yes, now I could see that the bevelled edges of the bridges don't match at all, but before - I don't think anyone could notice. OK, now that I look at the pics of early Masons the engraving is slightly different (deeper it seems), but it's not that obvious. Also one of the threads is broken and the bearing is not secured well. Normally I'd find a slightly bigger bridge screw, but, since it's not original anyway, I used a slightly older balance cock, with more reddish gilt, and matching edge.

    http://imageshack.us/a/img195/562/dsc06737d.jpg

    It's done, runing, with fine amplitude. The problem was that it gained about 2 minutes in 2 hours(so it was probably a quick train balance I guess), but replacing two small screws with two heavier ones 'did the trick' and it runs fine now (could be even just a touch faster, to center the regulator, but it's acceptable).
    Strangely enough I've noticed, there is no S/N on the balance somehow. I'm angry - once again I was lured by the low S/N and didn't notice the flaws. I guess I'll be buying inspected, serviced watches fro now on, because it hurts. If the balance cock was OK, I'd be very happy with the watch and like this - well, there is this nasty feeling, that it surely wasn't worth the money I paid, much less I think.
    I'm not going to get rid of it nonetheless, I'll leave it as a reminder of how careful one must be...

    Oh - if you need a 122522 balance cock - I can provide one ;)
     
  34. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    Sometimes things are replaced because there is need for it...maybe they loved the watch enough to preserve it any way they could. Personally I find it better to have a watch that runs that's not all original than one that will never run that is all original. They were meant to be used, not sit on a desk.
     
  35. pmwas

    pmwas Registered User

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    True, but balance cocks don't need to be replace usually. I don't mind the balance wheel replacement that much as long as it's the correct part, but I'm always annoyed when i find out the cock is incorrect.

    Now back to the movement - it seems I've not timed a watch for a long time - I can still adjust the hairspring length to time it even better as it's running slow, not too fast :)
     
  36. ben_hutcherson

    ben_hutcherson Registered User
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    #36 ben_hutcherson, Oct 24, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
    For reference, here's a private label 4000 Miller with its original balance cock(the balance wheel on this one IS numbered)

    34.jpg
     
  37. pmwas

    pmwas Registered User

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    Yes, exactly. The same picture but sloghtly differently made :)
     
  38. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    #38 Squite, Oct 24, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
    But there are 1000 different reasons why it's different. The original assemblyman could have grabbed the wrong one, for example. We don't know. We weren't there.
     
  39. pmwas

    pmwas Registered User

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    Yes, perhaps. But it's quite doubtful, when the movement's number is 4 digit and cock number 6 digit. They are sepatrated by a few years in the factory, so no chance this one was made this way... I happen to have a watch with the 'issue' you mention. In my grade 106 the barrel bridge has a number slightly (two last digits as far as I remember) different than the rest of the movement. It's a correct bridge, and the damaskeening pattern matches the one on the top plate. This is a hard to get grade and I really doubt it has been replaced. I think it was a mistake made while assembling this run of movements.
     
  40. ben_hutcherson

    ben_hutcherson Registered User
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    If the number on a part is a few digits away from the serial number of the watch, it's not too much of a stretch to think it was a factory error. I have a Marion where the number on the balance wheel is one higher than the movement serial number.

    Once you get past 10 away or so, it's really a stretch to think that it's a factory error.
     
  41. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    #41 Squite, Oct 24, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
    Not necessarily. You don't know that those pieces are made concurrently. Sure they are assembled in runs, but it doesn't necessarily mean that when they run 1000 of a model they make all of the pieces of that model and only that model.

    It could just mean they pull out the boxes of stock parts and assemble 1000 as they are needed. That would be the sensible way from a manufacturing standpoint as they would have to change die setups, etc, on the machinery less often and that would save on production costs.

    Now if they did only assemble runs like stated above, it would make more sense to me to engrave the SNs on the pieces during assembly to avoid such a problem, but, again, I wasn't there so it's all speculation.
     
  42. ben_hutcherson

    ben_hutcherson Registered User
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    Watches were grouped in batches of 10, and held in trays in this groupings as they made their way through the various departments of the factories. Many of us have some of these assembly trays in our collections.

    It's conceivable to have a part mix-up within the same block of ten, but outside of this a parts mix-up is almost inconceivable.
     
  43. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    #43 Squite, Oct 24, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
    To you. To make a blanket statement like that and have no manufacturing experience is (to me) inconceivable. Things happen in factories that can't be accounted for by guessing based on standard protocol. Again, not one of us were there, so not one of us can be certain just because they own a tray. Just admit it. We're all guessing based on certain assumptions, not facts. What you end up with is a likelihood or a probability, but not a certainty.

    Am I really the only one here who's ever lost a watch part? Sometimes the inconceivable happens.

    Like I said originally, if it's not a factory mistake, then it's just a case of someone breathing new life into it. I know collectors want what they want, but sometimes I think they expect too much out of something that's been alive for 100+ years. Most of us won't ever get there, and even if we do, odds are we'll have a few parts replaced by that time.
     
  44. John Pavlik

    John Pavlik Registered User
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    Hmmm. # 122522 is listed as being produced as a Mdl 2 11 jewel, grade 2.. lever set... if it was a factory mistake, I wonder what balance cock went on that one, and so on.. the thing to remember, we can not prove conclusivly either way, but as collectors there is no value from this mistake, because we do not know if it is a mistake..or a cobble job.. so I for one, would stick with the manufacturing assumptions we know to be accuratly documented for my collection..
     
  45. Jim Haney

    Jim Haney Registered User
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    Squite,

    You have been an real asset to the MB since you began posting a few months ago, however, when to start to OK the replacement of PLATE parts as "breathing new life into watches, as an accepted method, you are out of line with the NAWCC and MOST collectors.

    Just clam down and rethink your statement. If you are giving your OK to replacing plate parts as an accepted method of saving old watches, you are out of touch with collecting and reality.

    This is not accepted in the preservation of watches. The common watches, such as 20-30 million inexpensive Waltham's, Elgin's that are under 15 jewels and under are not considered as collectors prized possessions, however switching plate components will ruin collectors horology in the future as unsuspecting people will buy these watches in good faith and discover that in the past, someone like you who thought that breathing fresh air into their watch, included ruining the collectability of the watch by switching plates with a watch made years ahead or behind their watch was a thoughtful act of preservation, will be upset and very disappointed that , in essence they were burned or fooled by someone in the past.

    These inexpensive, or for that matter, expensive watches, need placed in a parts drawer for donations of non-serialized parts, such as gear trains, jewels, etc.
     
  46. Steven Mercer

    Steven Mercer Registered User
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    Gee Jim

    Thanks for letting us Waltham and Elgin collectors know that the watches in our collection are not considered as collectors prized possessions.

    I guess my whole collection of Waltham Model 83's should just be thrown in the junk pile.
     
  47. Watchfixer

    Watchfixer Registered User

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    I have same situation as well, that I am in process of buying a partial 16s, 19 jewels Elgin B.W. Raymond movement missing a balance cock and balance. But I have plenty of different parts from compatible movements to make this run as carry watch for myself and and will be very easy to see that is not original when I am finished.

    On other watches, I DO keep them complete and restore if it is very significant kind. Am I doing ok? The stuff I'm buying are not kind I'm after, they are intended for learning to repair them once I have lathe up and running.

    Cheers, Watchfixer
     
  48. Squite

    Squite Registered User

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    #48 Squite, Oct 24, 2012
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
    I'm perfectly calm, Jim.

    Please tell me what historically significant value a watch will have preserved by sitting in a parts drawer waiting to be cannibalized.

    Not every act committed on a watch is done so with the intent to deceive. Some are simply done out of love for the watch. For the record, I never said I've actually done such a thing or that I would ever do it. I simply stated that I'd rather have a working watch than a corpse in a drawer. If I needed a bridge it's not like I would harvest one from another watch just to use it, but if I came across one that was already separated from its original intent and it worked for me, I'd have to consider it. It's better than seeing someone make an earring out of it, isn't it? In my opinion there is no possible way you can judge the intent of such an act just by seeing its outcome, after a hundred years of changing hands. A watch could have had dozens of owners in that time.

    As an aside, Jim, do you think that the tone of your post is really appropriate on the MB? A PM would have been a better choice IMHO. And I'm sorry if you misinterpreted the intent of my earlier post. I wasn't green-lighting a grass-roots frankenwatch movement.
     
  49. Daniel W.

    Daniel W. Registered User

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    Steven, there goes my entire collection !! Basically this is the only type watch I can afford to collect or should I now say own. Collection s out the window now !!:bang:
     
  50. Dano4734

    Dano4734 Registered User

    The best Hamilton's I got were online from ebay ... most all of them needed repair but in general I have made out very well and very please at the repairs and cost. However, I do a lot of trade of service with my watchmaker and he is top notch so that don't hurt either where other can't do that... and I e have paid too much for junk also ... if you look at the feedback on guys who sell a lot of watches , it works out pretty well if you do that before bidding
     

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