Newbie screwing up an Urgos movement

jbgrant

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Oct 10, 2015
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Just getting started working on clocks. I got a Barwick that was not working at all. After looking over the movement, a Urgos 32/1A, I discovered it was gunked up (perhaps not the technical description, but it had lots of black old oil in all of the pivot points). I disassembled it, cleaned it and got it back together. Huge thanks to the "what not to do", disassembling and reassembling posts.

It now runs and keeps time, but the strikes and chimes do not work. I looked at a post about getting things back in order, but I am still unsure of how to proceed. Is there a post for getting back to a "zero state" for the lock pins, and strike and chime mechanism? It did click on the quarter hour, but I stopped the pendulum because I was afraid it would stress something out. Mind you I still haven't learned enough about the different wheels and such. Something with a photo with arrows showing which part is which would be helpful.

Thanks for your wonderful help.
 

shutterbug

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Post a pic of the front of the movement. I can't remember what that one looks like.
 

kinsler33

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Aug 17, 2014
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There is a great deal of benefit (sez this old engineering professor) in studying the movement, somewhat intensively. That is, with the movement assembled and the minute hand mounted (without the dial) and torque applied to the chime great wheel, watch what happens when you move the hand around the quarters.

The minute hand rotates a cam that lifts a lever, thus initiating the 'warning' sequence, and then the cam drops that lever precisely (we hope) on the quarter hour, and this lets the chime train run. Everything is done with levers that block pins set into gears.

One complication is a pair of internal levers that constitute a self-correction mechanism. This prevents the clock from chiming until (1) the longer leaf of the cam lifts its lever a bit more and (2) the chime is ready to go through its longest song.

When the chimes sound on the hour, a chiming cam lifts yet another lever to put the strike train into warning, drop the strike counting rack, and thus begin the hourly strike.

All of which is to say that observation is really the best way to learn how the chime/strike trains work, and from that you'll learn what has to be adjusted.

M Kinsler
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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jbgr,
It's a good first step to test the chime and strike trains to see if they will run well enough to do the work of lifting the hammers.
You will need a length of fine wire to tie the locking levers in a position so they will be completly out of play. This will let the train run continuously but don't get your hopes up until you complete the next step. Now, with the train running along smoothly and the hammers lifting and dropping normally stop the train by lightly touching the fly. Do this repeatedly to see if the train will always restart under all conditions. If it won't restart every time, you will have to figure out what is wrong with the train. If it passes this test, remove the test wires and look to the levers that control and regulate the chime and/or strike.
Willie X
 

jbgrant

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Oct 10, 2015
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I lifted the levers and westminister chime now proceeds through the first, second, and third chime before stopping. If I stop the chime fly after the hourly chime sequence, the strike mechanism starts and goes through the correct striking for the hour. My guess is that the center cam is out of alignment with the locking plate and that the warning and locking pins are also out of whack.

Thanks for the help. I have another working clock with a similar mechanism, so I may be able to use that as a template for where things should be.
 

jbgrant

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Oct 10, 2015
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After reading the article referenced above, looking at "How to's", and reading some of the other posts in Clock Repair I was able to get the clock to perform. I did use a working Urgos movement I had in another clock as a template. Everything lined up, the chimes strike appropriately, the strike hits the correct time, and I was able to adjust the pendulum length so it is keeping time.

For a newbie it is a great sense of accomplishment to take something not working at all and get it back into order. Thanks for everyone's expert advice.
 

shutterbug

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:thumb:
 

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