Newbie needs help with a Sangamo motor

Discussion in 'Electric Horology' started by Salval, Feb 27, 2012.

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  1. Salval

    Salval New Member

    Feb 27, 2012
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    I recently decided to try my hand at restoring a clock and picked up a Seth Thomas at a flea market. After cleaning up the cabinet, replacing the cord and oiling the workings I discovered that the motor was weak and also grinding rhythmically. I cleaned and oiled the motor which helped a little but it still does the same things. Is it possible to rebuild it or is there somewhere I can purchase a replacement? The first picture is my clock the rest are examples I found online but are identical to my motor. Thank you.
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  2. eskmill

    eskmill Registered User

    Aug 24, 2000
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    Welcome to the Message Board Salval.

    There's more to it than lubricating the motor which not only moves the hands but winds the mainsprings that operate the chime and strike trains.
    Your photo don't reveal enough of the movement to identify which movement you have only the old Holtz-Kurz Sangamo motor.

    Is the movement in your clock of the type that has a couple of winding knobs on the back side? Those knobs pre-wind the time and strike mainsprings. The grinding sound may be on account of the motor trying to wind these springs.

    I notice in your photo that the motor pinion drives a large fiber-plastic gear. It looks dry. Normally the gear and pinions in a clock must never have oil or grease on the teeth. However, the fiber-plastic gear on this particular application should have a very light grease or heavy oil on its teeth. All other gears and pinion teeth must be dry else they accumulate abrasive dust. The fiber-plastic gear on this clock movement is an exception.

    Another photo of the back of the movement please.
     
  3. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator

    Oct 19, 2005
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    You mention a rhythmic grinding. The winding function happens at intervals, but does not normally sound like grinding. That's perhaps not a good thing to hear out of your clock. The winding is loud though, so could be normal too. Do the hands move at all?
     
  4. Salval

    Salval New Member

    Feb 27, 2012
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    #4 Salval, Feb 28, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2012
    Here are a couple pictures of the movement. Stamped on the backside is 1644 and 4606. This clock has a chime but I don't have it or the hammer portion on right now.The grinding is definitely coming from the motor, specifically the "bell" that has the drive gear on it. After reassmbly the clock kept good time for a few minutes.
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    Thanks again!
     
  5. Salval

    Salval New Member

    Feb 27, 2012
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    I fixed it. Upon further inspection I found the motor to be slightly bent. Once I straightened that out it did fine. The motor does still seem to be a bit weak though.
     
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