Newbie here with need of help

davids_1718

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Mar 26, 2010
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I just inherited a mantle clock and it is not working. I am a great fan of these clocks but I lack knowledge of them. I wanted some help in identifying the clock first in order to see if what I am need of is a quick repair or not. Anyhow I have taken a few snap shots and all I can say is that in the center of the back piece there is a star with a capital J underneath the word UNGHANS. Below the star there is a word curved that says WURTTEMBERG and an A32 stamped underneath it. On the top left corner there is a stamp which appears to be 100. People I AM NOT TRYING to fix this in order to sell it. I want to keep this as long as it is repairable. Please help a brother out and thanks for taking the time to read this.

I just tried downloading the pictures but they seem to be a bit large 3mb each
 

harold bain

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Hi, David, welcome to the message board. Your clock was made by Junghans, in the first half of 1923. If you can reduce the size of your pictures in your computer, we woould like to see them.
 

davids_1718

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Sorry the pictures arent so clear but I took the pictures with a camera phone. It seems that the clock housing was painted. Apart from my earlier inquiry how do I attemp to start the clock. I tried using the pendulum but the clock only works for 8 mins or so by rocking the pendelum 1 time
 

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davids_1718

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Mar 26, 2010
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I have the clock key. I tried inserting it and as turned it clockwise it only let me turn it less than you would like turning on a car. it was very tight
 

harold bain

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Make sure both sides are wound up. The right side is for the time, the left for the strike.
Now try setting it in beat.
 

davids_1718

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Mar 26, 2010
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when I wind them am I listening for anything? I ask that because I tried winding it and do not hear anything. Then I moved the pendelum and I got no results. I am doing my best to set it in beat but I am having a lil trouble understanding some of the terminology, however if all it means is that I need to tilt the clock either clockwise or counterclock wise then I understand. Question is again should I hear anything before I am setting the beat, or would I start to hear something once the beat is getting set.
 

davids_1718

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Mar 26, 2010
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Before anything I want to thank you for all your replies. I really do appreciate it. It has always been something for me to own a clock like this.

i have it ticking n tocking and it seems to be in beat with very little need to set it. I am testing it at the moment and I am hoping it last longer than the 8 minute test I put it through without winding anything.

Oops guess I spoke too soon. The clock stopped ticking and tocking. Am I missing something here. Is something broken?
 

davids_1718

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I must say the third time was a charm. Upon looking at the back of the clock I just happened to lift some stick like thingy that released something that made all the cranks turn and for the past 20 minutes the clock has been working.

For all those that dont know anything like myself "If in first you don't succeed, TRY TRY again"

Lets see if it stays on all night. Any clue on the model of my clock?
 

harold bain

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Your clock may need cleaning and oiling. Something broken? Can't tell from this distance.
 

Mike Phelan

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how can i reduce the size of them. i am not that great with computers, soory.
David, that will depend what software you have on your PC to be able to resize your pictures. I use an old version of Paintshop Pro to do that.

I have the clock key. I tried inserting it and as turned it clockwise it only let me turn it less than you would like turning on a car. it was very tight
That probably means it's already wound; also suggests that if it is fully wound, it hasn't been working so needs some attention as Harold said.

:confused: Turning on a car? :confused:
 

RJSoftware

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Apr 15, 2005
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Hello Davids. Welcome to the Nawcc.

Yes, it is in need of work.

The best thing you can do for now is to hunt arround for your nearest clock/watch repairman.

However, if your like many of us, without excess funds, then you might consider tackling the job yourself.

It's not rocket science, but, it is challenging.

If your the kind that likes to fix things yourself, then hang arround here and absorb some knowledge.

I'd suggest a good starter book, but back when I started, I did not get one.
So I am hoping somebody else will recommend one.

I took the long road. A good beginner's book would of made the road much easier.

One warning. Beware of the mainsprings. They are powerful and can rip your fingernails off. Newbians make the mistake of diss-assembly without the proper tools.

You have to let the mainsprings down FIRST before disassembly with a "letdown tool".

You can work on your own clock with just some basic tools.

Here is a picture that shows the letdown tools and some other items. For now you don't even need the C clamps as your springs are inside barrels.

I made my letdown tool from part of a shovel handle. It's really just a device that you can insert the clock key into. There is a hole drilled in the center and a slot cut to accept the wings of the key. In the picture below you can see I have the key inserted.

To letdown: You move the click springs off the clicks and then wind a bit with the letdown tool (like you said turn as much as a car would start).

That moves the click out of the mainspring's barrel ratchet gear. Then allow the handle to slide (unwind). And that is how you let the mainsprings down.

The first time you let down a mainspring is a little scarry. Especially if you got really strong springs. But you get use to it.

The C clamps in the picture are for open springs that are not contained in barrels. These are inserted arround the tightly wound open spring before letting down. They capture the spring so it can be removed.

Please note:

I am telling you this to give you a taste for your curiosity and so you will not suffer any misconceptions of buying tons of unecessary tools. Just the basic tools seen below can do much..!

But, remember, knowledge (from a book) is the best tool of all.

https://mb.nawcc.org/

Enjoy...!
RJ
 
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RJSoftware

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Mike

Mike, Mike, are you well my friend?

Your slippin Mike (is time to send you off to the glue factory?).

You could of had a field day with diss-assembly.

Who you dissin bout the semmbly..?

etc...

:p:Party:
RJ
 

davids_1718

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Mar 26, 2010
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sorry everyone my computer was down as i was restoring the clock. All in all for a rookie i think i did a good job. The clock itself seems to be working with the exception of the timing. It seems to be slow. bout an hour or so behind. also i noticed as everything was apart that the chimes were broken so i will be in need of the 2 inner chime sticks as well as adjusting the part that bangs into the. please pardon the inexperienced langusge. I will upload photos within a day or 2.
 

davids_1718

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Mar 26, 2010
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well here goes another issue. as i was placing the pieces together and layed the clock face down out of no where all the cranks started moving as if this thing was crazy. I didnt stress any of the cranks by playing with anything it just went off on it's own. (what was the cause for this?)

Also after that I'm attempting to adjust the timing sequence on this. Is it safe to assume that by loosening the 2 screws that hold the pendelum thing and that lil shaft in between the 2 covers that I'm doing the right thing. As i said before my terminology of clocks is terrible but I will work on it the same way I am working on putting this clock on my wall in it's most tip top shape. so please bare with me.

Where the heck can i find exact information on this dam clock. I must of spent over 10 hours googling and am coming up empty handed.
 

Kevin W.

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davids be happy you have the info you have.Junghans did not keep many records, that survived. I dont know what you adjusted, did you move the verge.?

Pictures might help too.
Part of clocks and clock repair is having patience.
 

davids_1718

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Mar 26, 2010
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Verge? I dunno I think it was what is called the pallet. It has 2 small screws that screw in the back plate and it's function is to hold the pallet arbor rod in place that is between the 2 plates as well as the cruch and cruch pin
 

harold bain

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Where the heck can i find exact information on this dam clock. I must of spent over 10 hours googling and am coming up empty handed.
Out of the hundreds of thousands of different clock models out there, it shouldn't be too surprising that yours wasn't singled out for an internet tutorial.

"I love to work on things on my own so i can further my abilities to do different things and by working on this clock i can say this much it is worst than working on my truck. but overall i am having fun learning"

Your mechanical knowledge that helps you work on a truck didn't come overnight, and neither will your clock repair knowledge. Get yourself some basic repair books to help you learn clock repair. Patience is a virtue in clock repair.
 

davids_1718

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Mar 26, 2010
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Thats pretty much the reason why I am only asking for information pertaining to my clock (movement maker, chime patter, etc.)this way I CAN get the right reading material needed to research.. Money is scarce and books are expensive. It doesnt seem too dificult to work on. I am being patient, I am especially loving the fact that when I am home I am being left alone to work on it. Even the wife wants me to do a good job on it. The ONLY thing that is frustrating is that I CANNOT find not even a picture of this clock let alone any specs on it.
 

harold bain

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It's not uncommon to have a clock that isn't well documented. This is why a basic clock repair book is a good idea, as the principles of clock repair will apply to your clock as well as thousands of other clocks. We don't have Clymers or Haynes manuals for every clock like there are for cars and trucks.
Familiarize yourself with YOUR clock by studying how it works. Most time and strike movements work on the same basic mechanics as yours, with small differences.
 

davids_1718

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Mar 26, 2010
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Thanks for the info now i have a question regarding parts for my case. Upon taking off all the house paint that was applied to it I happened to tear some material that was part of the wooden side pieces that can be detached. I thought some mouron left tape on it as they painted it. I suppose it is some kind of fabric that was applied to the side pieces so that when the clock chimes the sounds can be exited out of the clock. Would you or anyone else maybe know what kind of material that fabric is.
 

RJSoftware

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Hello Davids.

First of all. Rule #1. Do no harm.

But, that is easier said than done :p

But, keeping that in mind, try hard and avoid any alterations to the appearance till you get a better understanding of clock case repair.

For now, the objective is to get the movement running regular.

Go to the Clock repair section of this message board. At the top are the permanent "sticky" post.

One of those post will help you identify different clock parts by name.

Do that, then we can communicate better.

RJ
 

harold bain

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The type of fabric is not too important. It's there as a dust cover. Try to match the color originally used (probably a reddish brown color). Not being a sewing person, I would just call it a silky plush cloth.
 

Scottie-TX

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Have you established with certainty which direction this clock is wound? Some wind clockwise; some counter. Some wind same direction, time and strike (left and right); some wind opposite directions, left and right.
If you attempt to wind the wrong direction it will of course, feel fully wound.
 

any400day

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Re: Post your JUNGHANS clocks here

Where the heck can i find exact information on this dam clock. I must of spent over 10 hours googling and am coming up empty handed.
Right here on this Message Board.


Thats pretty much the reason why I am only asking for information pertaining to my clock (
movement maker, chime patter, etc.)this way I CAN get the right reading material needed to research…….The ONLY thing that is frustrating is that I CANNOT find not even a picture of this clock let alone any specs on it.
so far this is what i know. The chimes go off every 15 minutes (when it works), There is a number that appears to be 100 on the top left corner. It has the crested star with the J in the center and unghans arch around the jay. Underneath the star is that word WURTTEMBERG with an A23 underneath it. Someone please help
well i was hoping i can get a lil more info such as the name of the movement. what all the specs are of this movement. as i said earlier I am a true beginner looking to salvage this clock and restore it to it's fullest extent. I would not be able to that unless i know what it is able to do.
From the pictures that you have provided which are not very clear, the movement in your clock is a werk 74R i.e. a Model 74 with a rack strike. I think it only strikes the half-hour and hours with 4 hammers on the Harmoniegong No. 219 with 4 rods. The “100” on the top left corner gives the bpm (beats per minute) for this movement and like what the others guys have told you, the A23 indicates that the movement was made in the first half of 1923.
Your clock is the “Santos” Model No. 26/5 (Oak case) in the Junghans 1923 catalogue as shown in the attached page.

Vic
 

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Mike Phelan

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Hi David
BTW, this should really be in the "Repair" section?
also i noticed as everything was apart that the chimes were broken so i will be in need of the 2 inner chime sticks
Chime rods take no prisoners and will snap like carrots! :eek:
Is it safe to assume that by loosening the 2 screws that hold the pendelum thing and that lil shaft in between the 2 covers that I'm doing the right thing.
No! The escape wheel teeth will be damaged when the pallet staff (Lil) is raised when the clock is wound.

Patience is a virtue in clock repair.
I'd go as far as to say it's essential! If you burn your toast that morning (MikeIsm) don't try to repair any clocks that day. ;)

Have you established with certainty which direction this clock is wound? Some wind clockwise; some counter. Some wind same direction, time and strike (left and right); some wind opposite directions, left and right.
If you attempt to wind the wrong direction it will of course, feel fully wound.
These will always wind the same way (so designed deliberately); the only clocks I've seen that wind in opposite directions are those from USA.
Also, it's an 8-day so there is one wheel between the centre wheel and barrel, so it will wind clockwise.
HTH
 

davids_1718

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This has got to be a joke. A "SANTOS" what is the irony in this. That is my last name. This only mean that I dont care how many hours it'll take me now that I am truelly going to restore this clock with everything I got.I dont care how long it takes me. Everyone out there thank you sooooo much for your input. I REALLY do appreciate everything but I do have to go to the repair forum now because I moved the verge and now every time I wind the clock all the gears wind uncontrollably.
 

harold bain

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Hope you haven't done any serious damage:eek:.
A basic clock repair book is still recommended before you get any further into this. Making blind adjustments under power is like changing the spark plugs in your truck while it's running.
 

davids_1718

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Mar 26, 2010
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By the way any400day may i ask where did you get this information. can you refer me to a source so maybe if need be I can by it if possible? I would really like as much info as possible.
-> posts merged by system <-
actually what happened was as i was putting the finishing touches on the case the clock needed winding so I wound it up and wanted to see if that was the problem. At first it was just out of beat so on a daily basis i just tilted the clock against the wall. Upon putting the door on I nticed there was no tick left so before i wounded it up again i thought maybe the verge was not low enough being that the clock wouldnt beat right. After playing with the verge I wound it up again and as I started to put it on the mount the gears just started going hay wire. I didnt wind it as the verge was being adjusted.
 

Dave B

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Thanks for the info now i have a question regarding parts for my case. Upon taking off all the house paint that was applied to it I happened to tear some material that was part of the wooden side pieces that can be detached. I thought some mouron left tape on it as they painted it. I suppose it is some kind of fabric that was applied to the side pieces so that when the clock chimes the sounds can be exited out of the clock. Would you or anyone else maybe know what kind of material that fabric is.
If you do an online search for antique radio speaker grille cloth, you will find several sources. By digging through them, you can probably find something that is a pretty close match for weave and pattern to the cloth that belongs in your clock.

As to books, if no one has posted already, I would suggest you spring for the twenty couple bucks or so it takes to gat one of Steven Conover's basic Clock Repair books. That will cover 90% of what you need to know a this juncture.
 

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