New to Repair. Dad’s old Pearl clock.

PinballGuy

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Jun 9, 2023
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Hell fellas. I have a Hermle 1151 - 050H 1982. I have questions on the Escape. Is it supposed to fit tight on the fork? (Pictured) Also, does the fork need to be been closed once the leader is Inserted.(Pictured)Thanks. An

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Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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No, not tight ... your crutch fork has been damaged. The sides of the fork should be made parallel and at a right angle to the plate. Then check for a loose but not sloppy fit for the leader. The side clearance should be about the width of a strip of copy paper.

When the clock is in its normal position, the leader should be centered in the slot, and completely free to move around, zero friction.

Willie X
 
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Simon Holt

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Hi PinballGuy

Your 3rd picture shows what is called the crutch. That doesn't need to be opened up in order to get the pendulum leader (the rod the pendulum hangs on) installed - it can be manoeuvred into position by turning it at right angles. You have to do that without the suspension spring attached. Then, finally, you put the suspension spring on the leader then attach the spring to the suspension post by inserting a tapered pin.

Thereafter, what Willie X said.

Simon
 

PinballGuy

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Jun 9, 2023
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Confused by the question.

Why the need to open this in order to fit the leader? If the question asked is relevant.
This clock was in the family for many years. Never works that for long as I can remember. This is how I found, the leader was missing completely I’ve since ordered one. I hope it’s the correct. Clockworks guys say it is.
 

PinballGuy

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Clutch fork , As I move it with my finger left to right. It seems like the Escapement movement rocking isn’t smooth and fits loose and sloppy to the rocking motion. Does the escapement supposed to fit tightly around the shaft of the Clutch fork shaft as pictured?
 

PinballGuy

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Jun 9, 2023
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Anywhere to get the weights? I have 2 empty shells except for the 70.1 oz. 3 shells, two empty. So I’ve been told that it’s probably easier just to buy a new clock….lol
 

PinballGuy

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Jun 9, 2023
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Hi PinballGuy

Your 3rd picture shows what is called the crutch. That doesn't need to be opened up in order to get the pendulum leader (the rod the pendulum hangs on) installed - it can be manoeuvred into position by turning it at right angles. You have to do that without the suspension spring attached. Then, finally, you put the suspension spring on the leader then attach the spring to the suspension post by inserting a tapered pin.

Thereafter, what Willie X said.

Simon
Thanks for that info. If I remember correctly the clock hasn’t worked since 1985. It was moved from one home to another. It never worked since. I think it was broken during transportation. The pendulum was hooked directly to the (pictured)spring with no leader. (I recently bought a new spring due to the old one was badly bent and as I try to straighten it, I broke it. )I’ve since ordered the correct leader. And will try again with the Tick tock rocking rocking sound… it almost sounded like one side tick only…

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FatrCat

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Clutch fork , As I move it with my finger left to right. It seems like the Escapement movement rocking isn’t smooth and fits loose and sloppy to the rocking motion. Does the escapement supposed to fit tightly around the shaft of the Clutch fork shaft as pictured?
Greetings & Welcome PinballGuy, While I'm more familiar with French movements, from what I can see in your first picture it looks like your escapement may be of the type which works slightly different in that there are some escapements which aren't "fixed" solidly onto the shaft, but instead are designed to be held to the shaft by an adjustable amount of friction, something like a limited slip differential on a car, which allows the escapement action some ability to rotate on the shaft and "center" it's action to match that of the crutch/pendulum. (This can be great, compensating automatically for movements that aren't quite installed precisely level). The amount of friction they are held to the shaft with is usually adjustable, but shouldn't need adjustment if the crutch hasn't been removed in the past. The primary reason for my bringing this up isn't to add to any confusion, but tied to your mention of moving the fork L to R with your finger; if your escapement is of the type held by friction, moving the crutch back and forth with your finger in an arc that would simulate a wide pendulum swing would likely show as the escapement stopping short of the full pendulum swing, but "engaging" again immediately as the pendulum swing is reversed. If it is of the 'friction' type, you may need to manually bring it's position back nearer to center before things will begin to not seem way out of whack. When manually swinging the crutch, keep in mind that the normal, "ideal" total travel L to R of the crutch and pendulum is actually very short, and when the escapement action is centered properly in conjunction with the crutch/pendulum movement, the complete travel distance of the crutch (at the fork) for a shelf/mantel clock can often be less than 1/4" (getting release (tic/toc) of the escapement right at the end of travel equi-distant from center). Also, this can be an easy and helpful indicator to guide you towards bringing the clock into optimal running conditions where instead of only running for a brief time it can be started and then continue operating on it's own.

Hope this all makes sense for you- sometimes I have trouble explaining something without turning it into a novel, lol.
 
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PinballGuy

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Jun 9, 2023
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Greetings & Welcome PinballGuy, While I'm more familiar with French movements, from what I can see in your first picture it looks like your escapement may be of the type which works slightly different in that there are some escapements which aren't "fixed" solidly onto the shaft, but instead are designed to be held to the shaft by an adjustable amount of friction, something like a limited slip differential on a car, which allows the escapement action some ability to rotate on the shaft and "center" it's action to match that of the crutch/pendulum. (This can be great, compensating automatically for movements that aren't quite installed precisely level). The amount of friction they are held to the shaft with is usually adjustable, but shouldn't need adjustment if the crutch hasn't been removed in the past. The primary reason for my bringing this up isn't to add to any confusion, but tied to your mention of moving the fork L to R with your finger; if your escapement is of the type held by friction, moving the crutch back and forth with your finger in an arc that would simulate a wide pendulum swing would likely show as the escapement stopping short of the full pendulum swing, but "engaging" again immediately as the pendulum swing is reversed. If it is of the 'friction' type, you may need to manually bring it's position back nearer to center before things will begin to not seem way out of whack. When manually swinging the crutch, keep in mind that the normal, "ideal" total travel L to R of the crutch and pendulum is actually very short, and when the escapement action is centered properly in conjunction with the crutch/pendulum movement, the complete travel distance of the crutch (at the fork) for a shelf/mantel clock can often be less than 1/4" (getting release (tic/toc) of the escapement right at the end of travel equi-distant from center). Also, this can be an easy and helpful indicator to guide you towards bringing the clock into optimal running conditions where instead of only running for a brief time it can be started and then continue operating on it's own.

Hope this all makes sense for you- sometimes I have trouble explaining something without turning it into a novel, lol.
Yes, this completely make sense. Ok, so the slightly outward position of the fork that holds the leader. May need the downward pressure from the weight of the Pendulum in Order to create friction.. I will put it back together with the leader this time. I guess my dad tried to install the Pendulum hook directly to the spring without the Leader…Dad bought this from Fingers Department store so many years ago. I remembered the service people installing it in our living room…I was 13.
 

FatrCat

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Yes, this completely make sense. Ok, so the slightly outward position of the fork that holds the leader. May need the downward pressure from the weight of the Pendulum in Order to create friction.. I will put it back together with the leader this time. I guess my dad tried to install the Pendulum hook directly to the spring without the Leader…Dad bought this from Fingers Department store so many years ago. I remembered the service people installing it in our living room…I was 13.
Not quite-it doesn't need weight of the actual pendulum; remember the pendulum weight is carried by the fixed suspension point, not by the pivot/shaft of the crutch. When the fork "tines/legs' are corrected in position they will only "contain" the pendulum rod but not "hold" it directly. As WillieX mentioned there should be a slight, paper-thin freedom between the pendulum rod and the forks. If they're in tight contact with the rod you create resistance that impairs the escapement from advancing; too loose and you lose the power created by the mainspring. As the escapement advances, on the back side of each move forward, a small amount of the spring's pressure is released and this "taps" the pendulum rod, giving it just a tiny boost it needs to return back to the start of it's arc where the weight of the pendulum bob takes over to power it back through the alternate direction of swing.

David
 

PinballGuy

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Jun 9, 2023
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Not quite-it doesn't need weight of the actual pendulum; remember the pendulum weight is carried by the fixed suspension point, not by the pivot/shaft of the crutch. When the fork "tines/legs' are corrected in position they will only "contain" the pendulum rod but not "hold" it directly. As WillieX mentioned there should be a slight, paper-thin freedom between the pendulum rod and the forks. If they're in tight contact with the rod you create resistance that impairs the escapement from advancing; too loose and you lose the power created by the mainspring. As the escapement advances, on the back side of each move forward, a small amount of the spring's pressure is released and this "taps" the pendulum rod, giving it just a tiny boost it needs to return back to the start of it's arc where the weight of the pendulum bob takes over to power it back through the alternate direction of swing.

David
Got ya! I will be putting everything back together today. Which weigh powers the hands/Pendulum. I will be needing to order the weights once I find correct weight needed and where to put them. I have shell empty except the 60.1oz one…thanks again for all the info. I helps Millions.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Your clock requires a 7.3# weight on the chime and a 4.7# weight on the strike. The time weight will need to be 4.7# for a stick pendulum, or 7.3# for a lyre pendulum that's over 6 1/2" in diameter

Your clock has an 'auto-beat' feature. The little clutch, indicated in the first photo, is not supposed to be tight. Once all the obvious damage has been corrected, the auto-beat feature will adjust the 'beat' automaticly.

Note, the auto-beat clutch should never be cleaned, or oiled, or adjusted in any way.

Willie X
 

shutterbug

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The auto beat feature is implemented by a full swing of the pendulum. As wide as your case will allow. Then it will settle into a reasonably good beat.
 

PinballGuy

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Jun 9, 2023
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Thanks for all the help. It looks like the time is keeping correct. As a 3 o’clock Mark I just heard a click with no shaming. I did hear a click. My heavy weight is 6.8 with two 4.7

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