New to me - New Haven mantle clock

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by Chainsaw Matt, May 27, 2020.

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  1. Chainsaw Matt

    Chainsaw Matt New Member

    May 27, 2020
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    New member here and my first post, so hi everybody! Glad to be here!

    My wife bought this clock for me this past Christmas. It ran well at first but a month later everything stopped. I thought maybe it was overwound so I just kept starting the pendulum. It would run for a few hours then stop. I gave up and took it to a local shop to get it diagnosed and potentially repaired. The shop owner looked at it for about 30 secs and said it wasn’t worth repairing. When I asked what was wrong he said it needed to be disassembled, cleaned and re-oiled. Said it would be cheaper to remove the original movement and replace it with an electric movement. I declined. Last weekend I decided to look it over and see if there was anything I could do. I lubricated all the pivot points on the back and was able to get it to stay running (keeps time) but it won’t chime. The quarterly chime gear set will start to spin but then stops when the hammer gets half way up. I assume that there are more lubrication points on the front (face side) of the movement but I don’t know how to take it apart. Where can I find basic disassembly instructions? I bought book 8 of the Clockmakers Newsletter Workshop Series but no info there. Can anyone point me in the right direction? This clock is no heirloom but I would like to try to get it making noise again. Thanks in advance for any help!

    F35D6BE7-EC25-45C6-961B-6B18ECFD144E.jpeg 6BA0281F-63EF-468C-B4EE-02623614F80D.jpeg D77D492B-C0FE-4516-BF51-8F3CCB790AEB.jpeg 975A3E01-533C-4667-8A5E-182FC7043481.jpeg
     
  2. bruce linde

    bruce linde Technical Admin
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    Nov 13, 2011
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    there are no specific disassembly instructions... just best practices, starting with letting down the mainsprings before trying to do anything... very important.

    it obviously needs servicing, which requires full disassembly.

    i learned by reading through threads in the 'clock repair' forum... and purchasing a couple of stephen conover's books.

    you don't need that many tools, but you do need a let down set (try timesavers), clock oil, possibly mainspring oil, lint free rags, a toothbrush, toothpicks, patience, more patience, even more patience and a bunch of studying.
     
  3. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    The shop owner was correct in one way by stating that it needed a complete overhaul. He was also correct in that he didn't want to or was unable to do the work economically and would rather have fitted a battery movement. However, there are other repairers out there who will gladly repair your clock for a price you may well be willing to pay.
    It is a clock well worth repairing from my perspective.
     
  4. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    I'd start by getting it out out of the case which means first step, remove the hands and store them safely. ;)

    As to letting down the mainsprings, watch fingers.
    Particularly because your brain has to synchronise the timing of which finger to move when or .. have it cut off.
     
  5. Bruce Alexander

    Bruce Alexander Registered User
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    Feb 22, 2010
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    Welcome to the NAWCC's Message Board Matt.

    I think that your clock actually may have 3 plates, not 2. If that is the case, oiling the pivots on the front plate will probably improve the movement's performance but there is another plate in between the front and rear plates. It will be difficult, but not impossible, to properly oil.

    Your clock needs to be properly serviced. This is not a movement for most mere mechanical mortals to learn on.

    You can find clock shops who are willing and capable of taking care of your movement and I'm happy to learn that you turned down the Quartz Conversion. These clocks are worth proper care, but that care is not cheap. It's very labor intensive.

    If you want to learn how to do so yourself, I would recommend that you start the journey working with simpler Time and Strike Clocks before turning your attention to 3-Train Chime Clocks. It's a lengthy journey, but we can help you find your way. If you would prefer to find a competent, honest shop, we can help to advise you on that option as well.

    Again, welcome!

    Bruce
     
    roughbarked likes this.
  6. Chainsaw Matt

    Chainsaw Matt New Member

    May 27, 2020
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    That is one of my issues, I can get the minute hand to come off by removing the pin and the spring washer and then the minute hand will come out but the hour hand does not want to seem to come off the hollow shaft that it is on and I don’t want to pull too hard on it and break it. Is there a procedure to get the hour hand off? Do I need some kind of puller?
     
  7. gleber

    gleber Registered User

    Jun 15, 2015
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    The hour hand is press fit. Grasp it by the center around the shaft and wiggle left and right while you pull. It will come off.

    Once that is off, you will be able t remove the screws that hold the movement to the inside of the front of the case. You should remove the pendulum. And, you will need to unhook the hammer lifters. Be gentle and take your time.

    Keep posting your progress for more advice.

    But, this is definitely not a movement to start on. I think the best is a time only, or a weight driven time and strike from an Ogee clock - very simple and no springs to bite you or damage the clock.

    Tom
     
  8. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    Not a good one to learn on, we can advise you on a better choice. I have one and not looking forward to the day i will need to take it apart.
     
  9. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

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    You can always do what I suggested in my first post. Send it to someone who can.
     
  10. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    Gleber told you good stuff in the post below this one of yours.
     
  11. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    Just to go back to your first post: You cannot overwind a clock (unless you took a wrench to it). A clock is fully.wound when you cannot wind it any further. You cannot 'overwind' it, no matter how often people talk about that.

    I would just echo what others have said: this is a clock that is well worth repairing, especially as it was a present from your wife, but it is not one for an inexperienced hand to try. Take it to a clock repairer and get it done properly and your nice present will give you joy for many years.

    This is not to discourage you from learning to repair clocks, but start on a simpler one first.

    JTD
     
  12. Chainsaw Matt

    Chainsaw Matt New Member

    May 27, 2020
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    Ok, I’m convinced. I’ll try my hand at something simpler before I dive into this. That said, where can I find a reputable repair shop in the Dallas, TX area? Is there a shop list somewhere on the forums? Thanks again for all of the insight and advice!
     
  13. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    No, shops are not listed here. You could ask the nearest NAWCC chapter to you and I am sure they would be able to recommend someone capable.

    You can find your local chapter with the link at the top of the main page.

    JTD
     
  14. Royce

    Royce Registered User
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    While I certainly do not disagree with the above excellent advise of not starting your first clock repair on this particular clock, I do note the workbench and tools in the background of your first photo which implies to me that you are a talented, mechanically inclined, individual so I believe clock repair is certainly something you can do with a little education & experience, if you are so inclined. Just don't start that table saw up shown in photo 2!!!
     
  15. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    I work at the Veritas Tools machine shop.
    Nepean, Ontario, Canada
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    I am in the hobby to learn and have a challenge, why would i send it to someone else??
     

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