New member with a Urgos which needs a bushing job

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by Christopher Dubea, May 6, 2020.

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  1. Christopher Dubea

    Christopher Dubea Registered User

    May 6, 2020
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    Hello all,

    Thus far I'm fascinated by this forum and gobsmacked by the level of experience and advice demonstrated.

    My reason for joining is I have an Urgos movement which has a couple of shafts which need new bushings. One is fairly bad and causing the issues at hand and two others could use it if the movement was going to be disassembled.

    A bit of history might help. My wife bought me an Emperor Clock Grandfather Clock kit with a 5 tube tubular movement when I graduated from Graduate school in 1983. This clock has been with us since then, surviving flooding after Hurricane Katrina, and a relocation up to Northern Virginia where I now live.

    A couple of months ago one the nuts on one of the weights unscrewed enough for the weight to fall off the chain. It hit the bottom of the case with a bang, and upon inspection found the bottom of the case was completely destroyed.

    So, I removed the movement from the case, brought the case down to the workshop (I do woodworking as a hobby) and replaced the bottom. That all went very smoothly.

    The movement was reinstalled in the case, but it wouldn't regulate. I futzed around with it a bit, but never could get it to regulate.

    Fast forward until now, and like virtually everyone else, I've been sent home due to the Coronavirus quarantine, so I've got a bit of time on my hands. As such,. I decided to have a look at the movement to see if I could figure out what was going on.

    I built a temporary stand for the movement giving me free access to all four sides and set the movement up.

    IMG_20200506_145036 (Medium).jpg



    In working around, I noticed that the gear on the main weight drive shaft was binding with the gear which drives the minute hand, but not consistently. I can start the movement and depending on the time, it will run anywhere from 5 to 45 minutes and then stop.

    IMG_20200506_145042 (Medium).jpg

    Removing the parts from the front face, this is what presents itself:

    IMG_20200506_145254 (Medium).jpg

    I can wiggle the shaft back and forth a goodly amount.

    So off to the interwebs I go, and I find this marvelous place. Spelunking around, this thread presents itself:

    Bushing Using Hand Tools, and I'm emboldened.

    I've always been a tinkerer (I'm an Electro-Mechanical design engineer by trade), and while it looks like it's very complex, the movement is simple enough, that with proper care, and documentation I could disassemble it, rebush the three bearings, and get it back together.

    So, I've got a passel full of bits and bobs on order from Timekeepers.

    Once all the pieces show up, I'll begin the process and chronicle it here in this thread.

    I look forward to sharing this journey with you, and to be honest all this has really highlighted my interest in clocks. I've got an heirloom mantle clock that we got from my wife's Aunt's estate that regulates ok, but the chime mechanism won't stop once it begins. That will be the next challenge in the saga.

    until next time,

    chris
     
  2. David S

    David S Registered User
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    Dec 18, 2011
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    Welcome to the forum Chris.

    We look forward to your getting the stuff from Timesavers and getting started. Take lots of pictures.

    David
     
  3. Christopher Dubea

    Christopher Dubea Registered User

    May 6, 2020
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    Oh yea. I've got the memory capacity of a small soap dish nowadays, so there will be photos out the yin yang.
     
  4. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    That's a pretty complicated movement to get your feet wet on. I think you'd be better off starting on the mantel clock, and get some practical experience on that one. However, if you are determined to start with the big boy, I suspect it will need more than 2 or 3 bushings. Rock all of the great wheels back and forth, and make note of all of the pivots that move back and forth. All of those will need to be bushed. It should be a fun project ;)

    And welcome to the board! We're glad to have you on board!
     
  5. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    Apr 11, 2002
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    I work at the Veritas Tools machine shop.
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    You may have many problems and get frustrated taking on a chime clock movement as your first clock t olearn on.
     
  6. Christopher Dubea

    Christopher Dubea Registered User

    May 6, 2020
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    Appreciate the warnings. Unfortunately this is the only movement I've got that needs help at this juncture.

    I've rehabilitated similarly complicated mechanical devices in the past with good success. With luck, that trend will follow through on this one. The plus is I'm in no hurry, have plenty of space and will be exceedingly diligent and methodical as I go through this. Some of the discussion on this site has already helped out. There was a thread where a poster used piece of Styrofoam sheeting to stick all the pieces in as they came apart. That's inspired thinking. I'll be going through the other threads as well before I jump into the deep end to see if I can unearth any other gems.

    One thing that wouldn't hurt my head having is some sort of service manual for this movement. I've done some spelunking around the innerwebs with no success. I've found all kinds of stuff for Hermle movements but nothing for Urgos. Any pointers on that would be greatly appreciated.

    cheers

    Chris
     
  7. tracerjack

    tracerjack Registered User
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    Jun 6, 2016
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    I know starting with chimers for a beginner is asking for trouble, but I also think high mechanical ability can overcome much of the risk. Since this poster has already figured out what is most likely the problem and that while the movement looks complicated, it is actually rather simple, I think he has an excellent chance of succeeding.
     
  8. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Unfortunately, Chris, there are no service manuals, and never were for clocks. I'm not sure why, other than to protect the servicing end of the business from competition. There are good books out there though.
    Steven Conover's Chime Clock Repair has a section on the Urgos 9 tube chimer. It's very similar to yours in several ways, and you may find it useful for other clocks in the future as well.
     
    Dave T likes this.
  9. tracerjack

    tracerjack Registered User
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    No manuals that I know of. My only advice at the moment is to watch out carefully for little tiny washers that often get stuck on the plate with old oil when you take off a lever. Then as you keep working, they usually fall off onto the bench later on, leaving you to wonder what lever they went with.
     
  10. Willie X

    Willie X Registered User

    Feb 9, 2008
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    All good advice so far, especially from the people who know it's not a good idea to start out with a chimer ...

    That T2F bushing will fail again unless you can remove ALL the scoring from the front pivot area. This often requires a new arbor, or a bearing, or sending the old part out to be 'sleeved'.

    Willie X
     
  11. Christopher Dubea

    Christopher Dubea Registered User

    May 6, 2020
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    So the Timesavers shipment is on it's way. I did find the "Steven Conover's Chime Clock Repair" book on the 'zon and will order that.

    Appreciate all the helpful advice.

    Wille X, appreciate the feedback. If I can be so bold to ask; what is "T2F"? Sorry, I'm a newbie!!!! :)
     
  12. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    T2F= Time Second Front. So the second wheel of the time train, front plate. The biggest wheel is #1, and they count up from there.
     
  13. Christopher Dubea

    Christopher Dubea Registered User

    May 6, 2020
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    Timekeepers has three different sets of needle files, a #0, #2 and #4 cut. Which is the best for this?

    Thanks

    chris
     
  14. TEACLOCKS

    TEACLOCKS Registered User
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    Mar 22, 2005
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    A lot of people are not going to like this "BUT"
    When I was rebuilding these movements, I would bush this wheel .025" too the left, so when it would Wear it would wear back to where it should be when manufactured, then it could wear some more and then come to a stop.
    If you can understand what I saying :???::???:
    I just buy NEW ones now, don"t have to worry about some other small part wearing in the movement that was cheaply made in the beginning of the movements life.
     

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