New Loud Sessions Mantle Clock

Swanicyouth

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Nov 10, 2019
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Thank you all. Next my eye is out for a wall clock - time only. Maybe a Vienna Regulator or a Banjo. I live near Merrits & if you’ve ever been in that place it’s an overwhelming selection
 

Betzel

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The movement ticks loud
This is a great thread with so many suggestions and pointers. I have to make one of those test stands (and a floor extender)!

In addition to the time train "loudness" in the beginning of the first video, after you hear the usual tick-tock, tick-tock, when I listen carefully, I can also hear a few tick-e-tock tick-e-tock sounds just before the run to warn / strike. It seems intermittent. What generally causes this?

I suspect maybe two culprits, but might there be other causes? 1) Either the crutch-to-pendulum rod gap is excessive, so the impulse from the escapement "knocks" the crutch against the pendulum rod, but that would always make a sound (I think) or 2) the side shake of one or both of the crutch pivots is excessive and it jiggles around in there from the same escapement forces. Maybe both? Something else?

Have you all experienced this, and was this small kink eliminated during the repair? Is it generally heard more when a spring is too strong, or sometimes when a spring is fully wound? I hear this intermittently on one of my clocks, but am also just plain curious :)

[Edit - listening again in the after video it seems gone, and the springs are wound tight, but there was another clock running in the background. Looks and sounds great now; well done]
 
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Swanicyouth

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The stand is from Merrits.

I’m not sure. There is a bit of “knock” where the pendulum rod goes through the crutch foot. I’m not sure if this is what you mean or even if it’s normal?

the rod is centered in the crutch foot and it doesn’t look to be to big - so i don’t know?
 

Betzel

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Thanks for the note on the stand. And, yes, that is what I meant. I believe some play (and micro-knocking) is likely normal, but a lot is not.

Listening for faint trouble is kind of picayune, and part of the OCD many of us share? The tick-e-tock sound I heard in your before video was not exhibiting in the after video. So I thought you had addressed it in your well-done overhaul. But, maybe it's still there? Did you bush/close them or reduce the crutch-to-rod gaps during the repair?

You might reduce background noise and listen for it just as the lifting pin begins to raise the strike cam/warning arm just before the run, maybe 10 minutes before the hour or so. Roughbarked's comment about strain during this increased load made sense and was helpful to me. If you hear it as well during the lift, please post? At least, I'm curious!

So, this was really more of a general question as I have one that "exhibits" the same way and I couldn't isolate the cause (mentally or on the actual clock). When I heard it here, I figured I would ask to see if others noticed it as well. There has to be some play at both the crutch and it's pivots, and those pivots are the loosest ones on any clock, I think. "Enough but not too much"?
 

Swanicyouth

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I replacement a few bushings - but none on the escapement. I did bend the crutch a little & try to tighten the foot. The pendulum swings a little cock eyed & not sure what to do about it.

What I mean is, while The crutch swings parallel to the movement - the pendulum swings a little twisted. Maybe I just need to bend the hook the pendulum sits on a hair
 

Betzel

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the eybrow hair of a newt
Yep. These have to freely center by gravity in two planes, with just that amount of play, so the bob rests dead-center when not under power, and the bob hangs (and hopefully swings) straight and true. If the spring, rod, crutch, bob etc. were not altered by a previous repair --as they so often are-- then it may make sense to gently adjust the fork via rotation and/or bending.

Now I remove the spring to do that, as the forks are usually pretty sturdy (maybe to resist being adjusted?) It's easy to over-crimp, put kinks in the spring or slip with the pliers. At least (unlike watch hairsprings) these can often be manipulated back straight with patience and a well-dressed pair of tweezers, but it's rarely like-new again.

Sometimes a bad spring or heavy bob (or someone moving it around with the pendulum still in) leads to a wobbly pendulum that looks like it should swing fine, but doesn't. When you say cockeyed, do you mean at rest, in swing, or both?
 

Swanicyouth

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It was at swing only and it was swinging not perfectly parallel to the plates. I bent the rod with the hook that holds the pendulum with 2 pairs of tiny needle nose pliers. Of course now the rod itself looks a little bumpy - but it works so I’m leaving it alone.
 
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