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NEW LONG CASE CLOCK FINNEMORE WALKER FALSE PLATE WITH 14" DIAL ANY THOUGHTS?

Chris Klausen

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Feb 17, 2020
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Hi everyone I picked this one up today. The dial is large 14" and it's about 89" tall. Any thoughts? Again thank you all in advance!

IMG_8243.jpg IMG_8244.jpg IMG_8234.jpg IMG_8235.jpg IMG_8236.jpg IMG_8238.jpg IMG_8239.jpg IMG_8240.jpg IMG_8241.jpg IMG_8242.jpg IMG_8245.jpg IMG_8247.jpg IMG_8248.jpg IMG_8250.jpg
 
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jmclaugh

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Jun 1, 2006
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The dial has had a tough life and it's all in need of some tlc but nice. Walker & Finnemore are listed as dialmakers c 1808-11, larger dials were common by this time. The Finnemore clan were dialmakers over quite a bit after that.
 

Chris Klausen

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Feb 17, 2020
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Sadly I don't see any trace of a name or city on the face. I hope to get it running this week. My research shows the same years for the dial 1808-1811. Would Walker & Finnemore have supplied a blank dial or would someone in their shop have painted it?
 

jmclaugh

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Jun 1, 2006
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The production of these dials required specialist skills and I doubt your average clockmaker had the skill to paint a blank dial. The introduction of these dials created a new industry and many firms were established to supply them. It is possible the maker of the clock used a dial by another dialmaker and a falseplate from Walker & Finnemore or both the dial and the falseplate were made by the latter. If the dial has no dialmaker's mark on it then it is unlikely you will be able to confirm who made it.
 

novicetimekeeper

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Jul 26, 2015
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Is the painting in the hood on wood or glass?

What country are we in?

The case looks later in design than the dates for the dial and falseplate. The movement does not have grooves on the barrels.
 

Chris Klausen

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Feb 17, 2020
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The painting is on metal. The clock was imported from England to the U.S in the 1960's. What is it about the case that indicates it was made later? Thanks
 

novicetimekeeper

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Jul 26, 2015
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the width of the case, its general rather chunky look, its short door. To an extent the decoration too.

It isn't my area of collecting but I associate this look with mid 19th century clocks. The smooth barrels are extremely unusual on an English clock.
 

Chris Klausen

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Feb 17, 2020
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I agree but I have a 1795 English clock that is not a marriage with very similar dimensions so I'm confused.

IMG_1708.jpg
 

novicetimekeeper

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Jul 26, 2015
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I agree that is very chunky, but the door is the same length as the trunk, this one it is not is it?

EDIT, Also this one doesn't have all the stringing on the timber, it is a much simpler design.
 

Chris Klausen

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Feb 17, 2020
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Good point. I found this George III clock with very similar painted design on the hood which would fit the time period. I just picked it up yesterday so I need to spend more time looking at it. Thanks!
 

Chris Klausen

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Feb 17, 2020
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You're right about the drums. What I thought were the normal grooves are just marks from the cord. One interesting thing is of the 11 clocks I have and the many others I've seen in the last year I've never seen this much wear on the bottom of the opening from the weights. I know all of this wear happened before 1960 the last time this clock ran so if it's not the original case it's been with this movement for a long time. Maybe you can help answer one question I have why were so many cases switched? It seems much easier just to leave everything together as they originated. Again thank you for taking so much time to share your expertise!

IMG_8266.jpg
 

Room 335

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Aug 16, 2018
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Yes a beautiful clock!
On the basis of the pictures I would not immediately think the case was 'wrong' for a movement of this age although closer inspection may reveal more of course.
This style of case, in particular the built in swan neck centre/ spire, was popular in and around Manchester from around 1800. At the time the Northern 'powerhouse' cities were at the forefront of clock fashion. Even from the 1790s clock cases were getting wider... it's pretty much turned on its head from general desirability now, your forward thinking Manchester merchant of the time would have wanted the latest fashion and wider case/ large dial/ impressive pediment were all factors in that.
I had a clock of similar age (c1810), definitely with original case (slightly wider if anything) and identical shape and detailing to trunk door, you would think a strong possibility that it was by the same case maker. Sadly that one had no maker's name either.
Your case would have had feet originally I think, that would help the proportions slightly but obviously add a little to the height. I always want to re-instate the feet on clocks of this type but have learned that it can be a pointless exercise if they don't fit under modern ceilings...
From the pictures the dial looks in reasonable shape and would restore well. These painted dials invariably look superb after a sensitive cleaning and re-furb.
Richard
 

novicetimekeeper

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Jul 26, 2015
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as to switching cases, well longcase were extremely unpopular at one point on the 20th century. Dealers would take out painted dials and p[ut brass dials in hoping to get more for it in a nice case.Cases would be broken up for firewood, clocks sent to scrap.

Though prices are rock bottom now they have been worse.
 

Chris Klausen

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Feb 17, 2020
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Thank you very much guys. Do you have a picture of your clock Richard? I'd love to see it! Thanks, Chris
 

Chris Klausen

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Feb 17, 2020
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I found this picture of an 1800 Manchester clock very similar to mine.

Longcase-clock-by-shepley-of-manchester.jpg