• Important Executive Director Announcement from the NAWCC

    The NAWCC Board of Directors is pleased to announce that Mr. Rory McEvoy has been named Executive Director of the NAWCC. Rory is an internationally renowned horological scholar and comes to the NAWCC with strong credentials that solidly align with our education, fundraising, and membership growth objectives. He has a postgraduate degree in the conservation and restoration of antique clocks from West Dean College, and throughout his career, he has had the opportunity to handle some of the world’s most important horological artifacts, including longitude timekeepers by Harrison, Kendall, and Mudge.

    Rory formerly worked as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, where his role included day-to-day management of research and digitization projects, writing, public speaking, conservation, convening conferences, exhibition work, and development of acquisition/disposal and collection care policies. In addition, he has worked as a horological specialist at Bonhams in London, where he cataloged and handled many rare timepieces and built important relationships with collectors, buyers, and sellers. Most recently, Rory has used his talents to share his love of horology at the university level by teaching horological theory, history, and the practical repair and making of clocks and watches at Birmingham City University.

    Rory is a British citizen and currently resides in the UK. Pre-COVID-19, Rory and his wife, Kaai, visited HQ in Columbia, Pennsylvania, where they met with staff, spent time in the Museum and Library & Research Center, and toured the area. Rory and Kaai will be relocating to the area as soon as the immigration challenges and travel restrictions due to COVID-19 permit.

    Some of you may already be familiar with Rory as he is also a well-known author and lecturer. His recent publications include the book Harrison Decoded: Towards a Perfect Pendulum Clock, which he edited with Jonathan Betts, and the article “George Graham and the Orrery” in the journal Nuncius.

    Until Rory’s relocation to the United States is complete, he will be working closely with an on-boarding team assembled by the NAWCC Board of Directors to introduce him to the opportunities and challenges before us and to ensure a smooth transition. Rory will be participating in strategic and financial planning immediately, which will allow him to hit the ground running when he arrives in Columbia

    You can read more about Rory McEvoy and this exciting announcement in the upcoming March/April issue of the Watch & Clock Bulletin.

    Please join the entire Board and staff in welcoming Rory to the NAWCC community.

New Haven Steeple - Ballpark Date of Production

centame

Registered User
Dec 13, 2005
148
0
16
Country
Hi all, just acquired this New Haven Gothic Steeple. Its main features are the winding holes are situated below the chapter ring; the door is opened/closed via a twisting tab rather than a button; its pedestal is plain without any contours. I am going to guess late 19th C, maybe 1870s?? A more definitive answer than my guestimate would be most welcome. Apologies, the image seems to be slightly out of focus. Thanks for looking.

IMG_20200124_230302.jpg
 

Uhralt

NAWCC Member
Sep 4, 2008
5,034
623
113
Country
Region
Hi all, just acquired this New Haven Gothic Steeple. Its main features are the winding holes are situated below the chapter ring; the door is opened/closed via a twisting tab rather than a button; its pedestal is plain without any contours. I am going to guess late 19th C, maybe 1870s?? A more definitive answer than my guestimate would be most welcome. Apologies, the image seems to be slightly out of focus. Thanks for looking.

View attachment 567983
What you have is an 8-day steeple clock with a nice tablet. The winding holes of the 8-day variety are located low on the dial. 8-day steeples are less common than the 30 hour ones, thus more desirable. I would age it around 1850. If it has the original springs, they would occur somewhat coarse, making a grinding noise during winding when almost fully wound.

Uhralt
 

Steven Thornberry

User Administrator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Jan 15, 2004
23,116
1,387
113
Here and there
Country
A look at the label (if any) and the movement might help in narrowing down a date. Ca. 1870, New Haven changed the style of its escape wheel bridges from this
EW Bridge Old.JPG

to this
EW Bridge New.jpg

The case style is very much the Chauncey Jerome steeple shown below (with a 30-hour Manross movement). After Jerome's bankruptcy in 1856, New Haven took over the business; so, perhaps your case was a holdover from Jerome, though it needn't be by any means. Still, what are the case dimensions? And, again, a look at the movement and label would be useful.
Steeple.JPG
 

centame

Registered User
Dec 13, 2005
148
0
16
Country
Thanks for those helpful responses Urhalt & Steven. As suggested, here are the images Steven. Dimensions are as follows: Height, circa 19 &1/2" (~50 cm); Width (at base) 10" (~25.4 cm); Depth (at base) 4 1/8" (~10.5 cm).

IMG_20200125_180052.jpg IMG_20200125_180124.jpg
 

Steven Thornberry

User Administrator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Jan 15, 2004
23,116
1,387
113
Here and there
Country
Thanks for the pictures, centame. The movement is what I thought it might be. Snowden Taylor has stated in the NAWCC Bulletin his belief that this Y-plate movement was first made by New Haven shortly after January 28, 1857, when New Haven completed its takeover of the Jerome Manufacturing company. So, I believe your clock could not have been made before 1857.

The label, to my thinking, suggests sometime in the 1860's, but I will defer to others who might know better. In any event, the style of your movement's escape wheel bridge (the earlier style) puts the movement at no later than ca. 1870 depending on when exactly the later style of escape wheel bridge was introduced.

It occurs to me to ask whether there is at the bottom of the label a line identifying the label printer. That might narrow the date down a bit, but not necessarily.
 

Uhralt

NAWCC Member
Sep 4, 2008
5,034
623
113
Country
Region
Thanks for those helpful responses Urhalt & Steven. As suggested, here are the images Steven. Dimensions are as follows: Height, circa 19 &1/2" (~50 cm); Width (at base) 10" (~25.4 cm); Depth (at base) 4 1/8" (~10.5 cm).

View attachment 568158 View attachment 568159
You've got the pre - 1870 style of movement, so maybe my guess of around 1850 isn't too far off. I'm no expert for the label, maybe it contains more clues.

Uhralt
 

centame

Registered User
Dec 13, 2005
148
0
16
Country
The label was printed by "J.H. Benham & Son, Printers, New Haven Conn"
 

Steven Thornberry

User Administrator
Staff member
NAWCC Member
Jan 15, 2004
23,116
1,387
113
Here and there
Country
The label was printed by "J.H. Benham & Son, Printers, New Haven Conn"
Thanks for the information. From what I remember, that printer's name would put it in the 1860's to early 1870's. Given the style of the escape wheel bridge, I would opt for the 1860's, but I would be willing to hear from others who know better.
 

Jerome collector

NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Member
Sep 4, 2005
883
95
28
Omaha, NE
Country
Region
J.H. Benham was in business as a printer for many years, however the partnership "& Son" only appears in the New Haven Directories from 1867-1872. I agree with Steven that the printer date and escape wheel bridge point to a late 1860s origin for the clock.
Mike
 

centame

Registered User
Dec 13, 2005
148
0
16
Country
Well thank you all, that seems to narrow it down to late 1860s. The use of the label as part of the dating method is intriguing. So that brings me to a follow on query. On page 55 of the EJ Tyler book on American clocks there is an image of an Ansonia steeple. The label layout, font and text wording are incredibly similar to that of my New Haven. I would have thought that different companies would have opted for a unique label and unique wording for marketing purposes - any thoughts Mike or Steven on why the labels are so similar?
 

Lidenhour

New Member
Jan 26, 2021
3
0
1
39
Country
I bought one off eBay and it is identical though someone has refinished it. Excellent veneer and identical movement with the earlier escape wheel. I did however have to order a reproduction pair of hands and a new metal powder-coated dial. I cleaned the movement and restored the dial and hands and she works perfectly. I am a collector and restorer of more weight clocks and woodwork clocks so am not very knowledgeable about these so glad to see this info above it helped a lot. Below is a photo of when I bought it and one after finishing it
Thanks.

DSC03689.JPG steeple when i got it.PNG
 

514 Poplar Street
Columbia, PA 17512

Phone: 717-684-8261

Contact the Webmaster for perceived copyright infringement (DMCA Registration Number 1010287).

Copyright © National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors Inc (A 501c3 non-profit corporation). All Rights Reserved.

The NAWCC is dedicated to providing association services, promoting interest in and encouraging the collecting of clocks and watches including disseminating knowledge of the same.