New Haven "Gem" circa 1870's 30 hour or 8 day??

legosnell

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Just starting on a new clock project for teardown, cleaning and repair. A New Haven "Gem" CIRCA 1876?? Case is in bad shape but will probably pretty much leave as is as well as the dial. Nice patina and natural aging. Found in attic with several others by son of late father with no interest for whatever reasons. $20 and probably not worth much more than that but for me It's a 145 year old treasure! Online research seems to identify it a couple of ways. 30 hour clock or 8 day clock. Which is it? It's the first clock movement I have attempted to work on that has the smaller mainsprings that utilize the small size c clamps and instead of using bolt and nut for the plate posts, it uses tapered pins or nails. 20210208_142521 (2).jpg 20210208_142219.jpg 131063006_10224657412407902_8703830072229513308_o.jpg
 

ChimeTime

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I was going to say that the movement looks surprisingly like an 8 hr Ansonia I own with a patent date of 1883.
 

legosnell

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I was going to say that the movement looks surprisingly like an 8 hr Ansonia I own with a patent date of 1883.
there is no trademark stamp in the plates? but I've seen that before with one other New Haven
 

ChimeTime

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A photo of my Ansonia movement of about the same period...



Not hijack the conversation. I just saw so many similarities.
 
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Jerome collector

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Not really contributing anything new, but I agree with Steven that this is without question a New Haven 30-hr movement. Many of their movements were not marked in any way.
Mike
 
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legosnell

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So a person would wind this clock everyday at about the same time? I have noticed after cleaning and 7 new bushings that the chiming train on this 1876 clock doesn't work consistently unless the spring is wound up all the way. Still in the process of evaluating correct operation and troubleshooting after overhaul and reassembly today. Maybe I should have replaced the mainspring on the chiming train. Going train works great. Seems these springs are weak and probably so considering 30 hour operation but per design. Modern replacement springs may be stronger? Cleaned, rebuilt, 7 bushings, oiled. complete.jpg
 
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ChimeTime

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I have noticed after cleaning and 7 new bushings that the chiming train on this 1876 clock doesn't work consistently unless the spring is wound up all the way. Maybe I should have replaced the mainspring on the chiming train.
You've got to remember that nearly all of the steel alloys and special heat treatments that we have today didn't even start to show up until ~1910. So the OEM spring probably has given up.
 
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Willie X

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The springs are rarely the problem.

Check to see that the hammer spring is not to tight. The hammer lift should be about 3/4" or less. The fly should turn several rotations before the hammer tail makes contact with a lifting pin.

Also, it's common for new bushings to be left to tight and pivots to be tapered. All new bushing need to have a slight chamfer on the inside edge of the pivot hole. You can leave the old pivot holes as is. Test arbors (alone) with arbors in both vertical positions. End shake all around, etc. etc. etc.

Willie X
 
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