New Haven crystal regulator mainspring servicing

Jim Hartog

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Jan 6, 2010
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Hello,

I just took apart my first crystal regulator taking copious notes on the way in. It is a New Haven "Thoreau" but my Ansonia's look to be the same. I have a Joe Collins type spring winder and have done many loop end springs and a few springs in barrels like anniversary clocks. I have also done springs in barrels by hand, I think it was a Jauch. This type has me stumped. I don't see how I do this with my spring winder.

Is this a "do by hand"?

Jim

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doug sinclair

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Aug 27, 2000
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I solved a similar problem some years ago by making up a dummy barrel arbor, and this enables you to operate the mainspring winder in the same manner as with any barrelled mainspring. You have a mainspring winder. Why risk yourself and the spring by doing it by hand?
 

Jim Hartog

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Jan 6, 2010
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Whitby, Ontario, Canada
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Hello Doug,

I have a dummy arbor.

So I remove the arbor from the spring. Put in the dummy arbor. Wind up the spring. Slip on the sleeve. Let the spring down. Remove from barrel. Remove spring from sleeve using spring winder. And reverse the process for installation. Sound good?

Jim
 

Jim Hartog

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Jan 6, 2010
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Whitby, Ontario, Canada
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Hello,

Done. The dummy arbor idea worked like a charm. One caveat, however. I lucked out on the direction of the pickup hook on my dummy arbor. I will be making another that is the mirror image so that I have a pair that can pickup in either direction. The New Haven springs both went the same way, the right way for the arbor I had.

I was just using my dummy arbor to wind up good springs destined for storage and thus direction was not a factor.

Thanks, Doug

Jim
 

Jim Hartog

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Jan 6, 2010
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Whitby, Ontario, Canada
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Hello,

I don't have an old Hermle but I do have the mate of the dummy arbor I have. It is the mirror image and all I have to do is knock off the wheel and ratchet. It's nice to have a little collar on the arbor to keep the spring in the right place but, with the New Haven, the collar I had (former ratchet) had to come off because it was in the way. Maybe I'll make some collars with a set screw so that I can do both, collar and collarless.

Jim
 

amzgraz

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Feb 19, 2018
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As I dismantled my Ansonia brass and glass, I found the T and S springs enclosed in barrel which were mounted to the back plate. Hum:???: how to remove the springs. This post supplied a good method and I will use it.
My problem: The time barrell has two fatigue cracks, which begin at the outside edge. See pics. Suggestions on how to repair?? eg: 1.) solder a band around the circumference 2.) groove the crack and fill or ?? As this is an exposed movement, I would like to satisfy the repair and the appearance of same.
Thanks for suggestions.
Amzgraz

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shutterbug

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Oct 19, 2005
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A band is your best bet. It could be placed inside the barrel, and soldered in. That will reduce your inside diameter a bit, but should not cause an issue. You may have to redo the catch pin too. Any other attempt at repairing it would probably not be strong enough. A hard solder repair might be, but most folks don't have the equipment to do hard soldering. A local machine shop might be able to hard solder or braze it for you. Either way, some type of support metal will be needed.
 

bangster

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I've soldered patches across the crack, but a collar or band would probably be better.
 

R. Croswell

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Apr 4, 2006
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Appearance being a concern, I would put the "patch" on the inside. It should not be necessary to completely encircle the entire barrel. A thin piece of brass perhaps 1/4" or 3/8" wide to bridge the crack I think should do.That should provide a sufficient contact area for the solder. Leave a little space between the patch and the spring anchor. It isn't likely to cause a catastrophic failure if left alone. I would use 95/5 lead free plumber's solder - I would not use Tix for this.

RC
 

amzgraz

Registered User
Feb 19, 2018
141
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Rancho Cucamonga, California
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R.C. I did as you suggested and althought the cracks are visible the barrel is undoutably more sound. I believe that keeping the spring wound to service limits should lessen the interior forces.
thanks for your timely comments.
amzgraz
 

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