New Haven Clock

Dewi Clwyd

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Jul 20, 2018
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As a hobbyist I was interested to find out more about a wall clock I have recently been asked to repair. The owner suspected a broken spring. I agreed to look at it without having seen it.

I include pics of the clock and movement to see if you venerable people can date (approximately) the clock. I have seen online pics of movements that have nuts holding the plates together and wonder when nuts superseded pins, as this might help. It is a 9¼ movement giving an hourly chime. Happily I can report that the clock is running again, it just needed a general service.

I had never seen or worked on a New Haven before so the disassembly and subsequent reassembly proved to be an unforgettable experience, especially the springs!

What can you tell me?

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steamer471

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Nov 2, 2013
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Anglo clock. I have several and from what I have learned they are usually American movements cased in English made cabinets. My best guess is somewhere around 1880. Search the term and you'll find many examples. I recently purchased three. All marked New Haven, I believe these were a direct result of Chauncy Jerome's dealings in Europe importing clocks there.




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Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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Usually the US supplied product was a kit, including the dial, pendulum and hands.

From what I've seen, New Haven may have been the top player in this market.

In today's terms, this would have been called 'dumping', or a 'trade war'. It's still going on today but the players and products have changed.

My 2, Willie X
 

Dewi Clwyd

Registered User
Jul 20, 2018
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Anglo clock. I have several and from what I have learned they are usually American movements cased in English made cabinets. My best guess is somewhere around 1880. Search the term and you'll find many examples. I recently purchased three. All marked New Haven, I believe these were a direct result of Chauncy Jerome's dealings in Europe importing clocks there.




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Interesting information steamer.

The owner has finally brought me the brass rim complete with broken glass and hinge. Question...... how do I fit a new glass into the rim:???:?? Pics included.

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steamer471

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I have been fortunate enough not to have to take on this project yet. I have an English clock that has a metal ring on the inside of the bezel that holds the glass. I suspect that is what is holding mine as well. Here's a pic if it will help. Someone with more experience maybe can help. 20210613_075818.jpg 20210613_075810 (1).jpg
 

steamer471

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To clarify this is a picture of one of my Anglo's. The one I have with a inner ring is a latter clock. I have read where some glasses are cut close and the bezel is actually heated and then allowed to cool around the glass.
 

Willie X

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Feb 9, 2008
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This one would have some type of retainers. Usually soldered in rectangular brass clips, short lengths of wire, or a long circular brass wire that went all the way around, soldered at intervals. I've seen some that used glaziers putty.

There should be plenty of 'evidence left at the scene', to give you some direction ...

Willie X
 

Dewi Clwyd

Registered User
Jul 20, 2018
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This one would have some type of retainers. Usually soldered in rectangular brass clips, short lengths of wire, or a long circular brass wire that went all the way around, soldered at intervals. I've seen some that used glaziers putty.

There should be plenty of 'evidence left at the scene', to give you some direction ...

Willie X
Thanks for your reply... and Yes! you are correct. It's a very close fit but there is an inner ring. After looking at it from all angles I decided to give it a go. Took some pulling whilst trying not to distort the rim but I could see the gap slowly widening until the rings finally seperated. Just got to wait for a new glass to be cut. Original glass thickness was 1/16th, if I can't get 2mm (nearest equivalent) I'll have to squeeze 3mm in.
 
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Willie X

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Probably better to spend a little time and find the glass in the right thickness. For at least two reasons: it will fit without mods and be noticeably lighter. Willie X
 

Dewi Clwyd

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Jul 20, 2018
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FYI Willie X, 3mm glass fits extremely well into the rim. The original 'picture glass' as it used to be called when I did some picture framing some 25+ years ago is no longer available commercially. I managed to find a supplier who cut me an approximately sized circle of 3mm and I had to use diamond files to get the diameter right. The locking ring clipped iinto place without any trouble - so job done! Customer is very happy with finished result and I've expanded my knowledge and experience. I attach pic of result.

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Willie X

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Glad you got it fixed. Glass and bezel work can be very difficult at times.
Willie X
 

ChimeTime

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I have had great success using common clear silicone sealer. Six 1/2 to 3/4" long small diameter beads, equally spaced around the rim, either with the glass already fitted or new glass being installed. The silicone is a mild adhesive. It dries almost clear and nearly invisible. Any excess is easily removed after drying with a knife blade. And because the silicone doesn't harden, it still allows the glass to move, but adds a "shock absorber" quality to the mounting. It's especially useful on mantle clock rims that must flex to enable a snap-closure. Additionally, after curing, it's inert and doesn't attack the brass, so no harm is done.

And best of all, any rattling and scraping of the glass due to loosening soldered retainers, or improper diameter is completely eliminated.
 

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