New Haven 30 day movement question.

Jeff C

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May 26, 2005
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I am cleaning this movement and noticed these two gears sandwiched together outside the front plate. I see they work in conjunction with the motion works but my question is why is there two of them.

I indicated the gears I'm talking about with the red arrow on the second picture, it also has a small spring holding them in some way. The first picture is of the movement intact.





 

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eskmill

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Uncommon but still seen from time to time on clock's motion works are "scissors gears."

Scissors gears were commonly used on the tuning condenser used in radio sets. The spring loading eliminates any back-lash between the drive pinion and the wheels.
 

eskmill

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Your photo of the complete movement reveals an oddity I've not noticed on Connecticut production clock movements: the mainspring shield discs that separate the mainwheels and the springs.

On the other hand, most older Japanese made movements with open mainsprings, although patterened after Waterbury and Ansonia movements, have a metal shield disc between the mainwheel and the spring.

Off hand, I don't know the reason for the discs.

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Richard T.

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Apr 7, 2005
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Greetings all,

We should remember that this particular movement was patented in England.....that may or not explain some of the design differences. I do remember seeing a few New England production clocks with the same shields. You will notice that these are on the top side above the springs, I think others that I have seen were on the bottom side. ( Of course this all hinges on the fact that they were put on correctly the last time the movement was apart :) ). I also do not know the reason for these "shields". I will try and get specifics. I have had two of the 30 day New Haven time only banjo clocks and currently have one.

Regards,

Richard T.


 

shutterbug

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If the movement is visible inside the case, they might just be for looks. I can't think of an actual function they would perform.
 

Mike Phelan

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Dec 17, 2003
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Is it to give less friction if the spring rubs on the wheel crossings and click and clickspring rivets?

Or to stop grease from the spring getting where it shouldn't?

My wife's car uses scissors gears on the timing gears to reduce noise - this was a common use of these.
 

harold bain

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I have an 8 day New Haven that just arrived today. It is in a mission style shelf clock. It has the shields on the gear side of the springs. Must be a New Haven feature. Other oddity of this clock is the trademark is stamped upside down on the movement frontplate.
 

harold bain

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Like Mike said, it keeps the spring from rubbing on the wheel as it unwinds.
I have seen many Oriental clocks with this feature. They may not be nescessary, but don't lose them, just in case.
 

ticktock19852004

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Apr 5, 2007
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Hello!

One oriental movement i serviced utilized these shields to support the flimsy mainspring wheel on the arbor. Kind of a crude way, but it worked.

Neal
 

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