New clock... why won't it stay running?

Discussion in 'Your Newest Clock Acquisition' started by gleber, Jul 5, 2019.

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  1. gleber

    gleber Registered User

    Jun 15, 2015
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    #1 gleber, Jul 5, 2019
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 5, 2019
    Here are some of the reasons why clocks won't keep running, originally posted by @gleber.

    There are lot of reasons a clock won't stay running. I would start with Beat Setting 101. If that doesn't solve the problem here are some other ideas.
    • Out of beat - usually the first thing to check
    • Loss of power - dirty (clean and oil)
    • Loss of power - worn pivots or pivot holes (bush and polish)
    • Loss of power - binding (check for bent / misaligned parts)
    • Loose auto beat adjuster - doesn't impart enough force on the crutch
    • Incorrect anchor/verge depth in escape wheel (will affect the amount of pendulum swing. On a deadbeat, the escape wheel teeth have to land on the lock face, not the impulse face.
    Not all of the above may apply to your clock.

    Beat Setting 101
    "How To Do It" Articles!
    Hints & How-to's
     
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  2. tom427cid

    tom427cid Registered User
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    I flgured that the main reason was it was being just plain ornery!!!!!!!!!!LOL
    tom
     
  3. Tim Orr

    Tim Orr National Membership Chair
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    Good evening, all!

    Well, just for laughs, sometimes it's not wound! I worked on a Sonora Chime for a friend once. Got everything tuned up, and then he called me about two weeks later and said it had stopped. I picked it up and checked it out and ran it for a week, but found nothing wrong. Delivered it to him again, and again, after about two weeks, he said it had stopped.

    When I asked him if he had wound it, he said, "Well, that's the funny thing: When I went to wind it, the one side wound up, but the other was already tight." Did you guess what was wrong? Yup, he tried to wind both time and strike the same direction.

    I wouldn't have been that surprised, except that this guy was a professional mechanical engineer.

    So sometimes, it doesn't run because it isn't wound.

    Best regards!

    Tim Orr
     
  4. Les harland

    Les harland Registered User

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    Tom
    Elderly machinery is notorious for that
     
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  5. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

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    In addition to binding bearings, once in a while the hands bind. Especially easy to miss if you have the clock on the test stand and the hands are on the other side.

    Definitely the easiest malady to cure, though.
     
  6. fbicknel

    fbicknel Registered User

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    #6 fbicknel, Apr 27, 2020
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2020
    I found another reason:

    If the crutch doesn't slip over the pendulum leader freely, it will bind up and cause the clock to stop.

    I haven't determined what the ideal gap between these parts should be, but I think "daylight" should be a good rule.
     

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