Need to get this movement out safely

Discussion in 'Clock Repair' started by ta855, May 22, 2020 at 6:02 PM.

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  1. ta855

    ta855 Registered User

    May 5, 2020
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    Hi all,

    A click spring broke/fell out of place, on my Sessions movement. The mainspring is pushing against the case. I am looking for a way to get the movement out of the case to move the click spring in place, while having the least damage to me and the clock.

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  2. roughbarked

    roughbarked Registered User

    Dec 2, 2016
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    You could tie some wire tightly around top and bottom but not a lot can be done until you undo the screws and remove the movement. Wrap the movement in a strong but supple cloth before you attempt to remove it.
     
  3. Allan Wolff

    Allan Wolff Moderator
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    Mar 17, 2005
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    See if you can get a big hose clamp around the spring. Jiggle the spring as you tighten the clamp and you should be able to compress the spring enough to get it out of the case.
     
  4. Fitzclan

    Fitzclan Registered User

    Jul 20, 2014
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    I find that a needle-nosed vice-grip type pliers works well in this situation. Gather as many coils as you can and lock them down so they can’t spring on you. Good luck.
     
  5. disciple_dan

    disciple_dan Registered User
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    Mar 10, 2016
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    Take the dial face off. get a winding key that has a hole in the tabs. Find a strong piece of wire and fashion a hook that will go into the hole on one of the tabs of the key and the other end hook onto one of the columns of the front clock plate. Put the key in a pair of vice grips and carefully wind the spring until it is free of the case and you can get to the screw on that side. Hook the wire up making sure it will hold the spring in check. With another pair of vice grips, preferably needle nose, clamp it onto the bands of the wound spring and you should be able to remove the screws. That may sound dangerous because it is a little risky. Try this only at your own risk and if you feel confident you have the wherewithal to handle it. Maybe someone has a better idea and safer too. Whatever you do, be careful.
     
  6. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Fitzclan likes this.
  7. ta855

    ta855 Registered User

    May 5, 2020
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    Thanks to everybody who has already responded. I am going to try some of these out and see what works best.

    Thank you
     
  8. POWERSTROKE

    POWERSTROKE Registered User

    Jan 11, 2011
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    Can you get a strong zip tie in there to wrap the spring?
     
  9. Jim Hartog

    Jim Hartog Registered User
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    Jan 6, 2010
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    Hello ta855,

    Here's another option. Home made, I call it a letdown crank. Basically, a tap wrench with a 5-6 inch handle attached. I use it as a letdown tool when I want to count the revolutions to test a spring driven clock at 8 days. 8 complete turns is roughly 8 days for a typical American clock. Comes in handy for setting up stop works on winding arbors, too.

    In your case, I would remove the dial to access the winding post. Crank the mainspring tight, and, while holding the crank with one hand, slip a mainspring retainer clamp on the tight mainspring, and then let the mainspring down into the clamp. You may want to restrain the clock case somehow, just to be sure stuff doesn't happen.

    You can never have too many tools and this one comes in handy in a variety of situations.

    Jim

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    Uhralt likes this.
  10. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    I use the vise grips idea, and it usually works well enough. There have been a couple where I had to cut the spring out with tin shears. $8 or so for a new spring. Sometimes it's just not worth the frustration :)
    If the click is still there, and you can turn it over, try putting pressure downward on it as you wind the spring again. That will act as the spring did, and after you let the click mate with the click wheel it will stay there without your help.
     

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