Need Help with ID of German Locomotive Clock

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by RareCollectibles2, Dec 4, 2018.

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  1. RareCollectibles2

    RareCollectibles2 Registered User

    Dec 4, 2018
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    Hello,

    I recently acquired a clock and have been unable to locate anything about its origin. Hoping that those on this forum may be able to help.

    The clock is of brass construction, painted black and mounted on track with a wooden base. The back of the clock says Made in Germany. The clock face does as well. There are no other markings on the locomotive other than an E-8 cast on the inside of the cover. The wood on the bottom is a wormy wood. The screws to the base and the back side of the locomotive are flat head slotted machine screws.

    If more photos would help identify this I would be more than happy to add them.

    IMG_20181204_063432.jpg IMG_20181204_063423.jpg IMG_20181204_063457.jpg

    Thank you in advance,
    Dan

    IMG_20181203_181351.jpg IMG_20181203_181341.jpg
     
  2. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    Welcome to the board.

    Your clock's movement could have been made by almost any of the major German manufacturers. Please remove the back plate and let us see the movement, which may well have the manufacturer's name or logo.

    JTD
     
  3. Les harland

    Les harland Registered User

    Apr 10, 2008
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    The clock may be German but the locomotive it is portraying looks British
     
  4. RareCollectibles2

    RareCollectibles2 Registered User

    Dec 4, 2018
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    I never though about that. It is a British locomotive.
    The manufacturer would have purchased the works from any clock works producer. In this case its P. Mereminski.
    The works also say...
    Germany
    No Jewels
    Unadjusted

    IMG_20181205_192522.jpg
    I will do some searching for this design without the term Germany. Maybe it will lead me somewhere.
    I would like to know where and when it was produced.

    Thanks, Dan
     
  5. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    Nov 24, 2014
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    Is there another letter after "Mereminsk"? I see several mentions of Mereminsky on the forum, although nothing that likely helps with your search.

    Kurt
     
  6. RareCollectibles2

    RareCollectibles2 Registered User

    Dec 4, 2018
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    Kurt,

    Yes, its MEREMINSKI.
    I found some P. Mereminski clock catalog references

    Found a cherub clock on Worthpoint with the exact same movement but that auction reference didn't have any date or manufacturer information.
    antique-cherub-clock-made-germany_1_c2d54e934e440022d1567e9021fc0945.jpg
    Also was a completed auction on eBay with a P. Mereminski movement. Same face and hands but again no date or manufacturer.
    s-l1600.jpg
    I guess the upside is, if I cant find a lot of information on it, there must not be many of them out there.

    Thanks, Dan
     
  7. chimeclockfan

    chimeclockfan Registered User
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    Dec 21, 2006
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    Chime clock & gong studies.
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    The locomotive is a typical British outline, common during the late 19th to early 20th centuries. No particular class features stand out. I would hazard a guess you were supposed to place it alongside a wall to give the appearance of a locomotive emerging from a tunnel. Some may be inclined to create a mock-up tunnel backing just to suit. The only other point is that one of the buffer heads appears to have gone astray.
     
  8. RareCollectibles2

    RareCollectibles2 Registered User

    Dec 4, 2018
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    Thanks chimeclockfan. I may never know for sure who produced it but the upside is, I like it and plan keep it in my collection.
    The missing buffer isn't a problem. I work at a machine shop. Plan to turn a duplicate and age it to match.

    Thanks, Dan
     
  9. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    P[erez] Mereminski (y) (the name is found with both 'i' and 'y' at the end) was not the manufacturer of this movement. He ran a watch and clock materials house in New York City and would have imported this German movement from the German manufacturer. He died in 1953 but the business and name continued for some time afterwards. The Mereminsky name was just stamped on the backs of the movements (not always very carefully, as evidenced by the movement in question).

    I suspect, though I cannot prove it, that this little movement may have been made by Gebr. Hauser (Uhrenfabrik Weigheim), which made thousands of these little push-in movements which were used in a great variety of cheap and novelty clocks by various manufacturers. But I stress that this is only a suspicion of mine and others may have better ideas.

    JTD
     
  10. RareCollectibles2

    RareCollectibles2 Registered User

    Dec 4, 2018
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    JTD,

    Interesting. That ties it back to the old catalogs I found with Mereminski and also to the clocks I found with the Y replacing the I.
    Was discussing this with a friend of mine last night and he said a similar thing with regards to the movement being used in a variety of novelty clocks.
    Is there any way to date the movement?

    Thansk, Dan
     
  11. JTD

    JTD Registered User

    Sep 27, 2005
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    It's very difficult to say. I am not sure when the Mereminsky company started up, it may have been in the 1940s, and I believe they were still in business in the 1970s. Gebr. Hauser (Uhrenfabrik Weigheim) were in business in Germany from 1923 to 1998. These little push-in fit-up movements were made without much change in design for many years, both before and after the war.

    I've looked again at your photos. The more I look, the more I like it. The clock is nicely made, with more attention to the details than I should have expected. The buffers look as if they are moveable, the little brass rods at the sides and the realistic-looking track all point to quite a carefully made clock, and much of it must have been done by hand. I doubt if so much attention would be paid to constructing a novelty clock these days, to say nothing of the fact that it would have a quartz movement! I do wonder if this clock was perhaps made for a special, though perhaps relatively small, group of customers, such as members of a railway enthusiasts club or similar. Although the movement was not a very expensive one, the whole clock does not look cheap. Despite the loco looking British, the fact that the clock has a movement imported by a NYC merchant points to it being made in the USA.

    If I had to hazard a guess, I would think your clock was probably during the 1950s/1960s but that's only a guess. I'm glad you're going to keep it, I would too, if it were mine.

    JTD
     

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