Need help to ID Swiss pocket watch

lassnick

New Member
Oct 21, 2011
3
0
0
Hello, I am trying to learn and educate myself about this pocket watch I inherited. I do not feel very successful at the moment. Maybe some of you could help me, please?
Here is what I (think) I know... the case (hunter?) is marked with the grouse (=Swiss?), 0.800 (=lower grade silver?), squirrl =? and some kind of a flower, along with the number 10543?
The face is regular numbers with a second dial, blue (steel?) hands.
The inside back cover has 10 medals ? awarded to indicate excellence (if not just simply added to impress).
The workings are marked swiss made and have FS (fast,slow) AR (advance,retard) and a scroll, also 5 jewels?
The ring around the workings on the back is stamped with the squirrl and 543.
The stem (?) looks like it was supposed to pull out to wind and set and is also stamped with the squirrl.
I have no idea what the 7th picture is, it is on the case...could be crown, tombstones, rabbit's feet....I can't tell.
Anything else you need to know ask and I'll do my best to try and find it. It is pretty beat up and if the note that is with it is correct, it should be from before 1919 and has a not so great history...
I would like to know when made, by whom, and if I should look into getting it repaired.
Thank you for any info you can share. Sandy- lassnick
 

Attachments

Kevin W.

Registered User
NAWCC Member
Apr 11, 2002
22,691
407
83
63
Nepean, Ontario, Canada
Country
Region
Hi Sandy, Nice to have you here.
You have a nice heirloom watch.
Now for the bad news.To get this repaired and running is going to cost some serious money.if you dont wish to do this, you can display this with the history of the watch.
But if you wish to wear this watch from time to time it will cost money.
It all depends on what you can afford to put into it.
I am not sure of the maker, its Swiss but that is all i am sure of.
I wish many families would cherish such a item of yours, let us know of any more questions and i am sure someone can help you.
 

Skutt50

Registered User
Mar 14, 2008
3,623
153
63
Gothenburg
Country
From the pictures it seems like the main problem areas with your watch lies in the casing (plus the winding stem/crown). A new back lid is probably the most difficult part to find. The other parts e.g. crystal, should be more easily available.

In addition we know nothing about the mechanics and what is needed to get it running. It could be a simple cleaning and oiling but also more complex problems!

In total, repair will cost more than the commercial value of the watch.

The symbol in your seventh picture, to me seems like a poor German silver stamp. (A half moon and a crown)
 

lassnick

New Member
Oct 21, 2011
3
0
0
Thank you Veritas and Skutt50,

I do have the back plate, it came completely off when I opened it.

I agree, I think the stamp is the half moon crown, now that you say it and I look with that in mind.

If I wanted to clean the case, what would I use? Would I use different kinds of cleaners on the outside and inside of the case?

Here is a picture of the front outside...is the very outside ring copper? or does it appear different in color because of age and dirt? Or is that just the color of aged .800 silver?

Thank you again for your responses.

Sandy
 

Attachments

Kent

Registered User
Gibbs Literary Award
NAWCC Fellow
NAWCC Silver Member
Aug 26, 2000
18,489
1,872
113
Country
Like old coins, silver watch cases should not be polished because it will wear away some of the case material. Also, the patina of age has its own charm.

However, if you must do so, it is wise to remove the movement from the case prior to polishing, refer to the Encyclopedia article "Removing A Movement From A Case". Although your watch is not an American watch, it appears similar enough for the article to apply - but, if the movement does not come out easily, don't force it. Put the screws back in and leave to somebody more experienced to remove the movement. Better yet, leave it alone and don't polish the case.

Non-abrasive, silver polish can be used to polish the case. Be sure to remove all residue prior to re-installing the movement.

If you have the case fixed, you can leave the cleaning/polishing to the service person - if you still want to have it polished.
 

Skutt50

Registered User
Mar 14, 2008
3,623
153
63
Gothenburg
Country
The "copper ring" you mention is probably gold guiled on silver. This is quite common on these cases and the gold will wear off with age and use.

The case is made of silver so you can clean it as you would any jewelry. Just remember there might be a steel rod used as a hinge. If there is water in the cleaning fluid or if you rinse with water it is advisable to dip the case in alcohol to draw away any water left........
 

lassnick

New Member
Oct 21, 2011
3
0
0
Thank you all sooo much! I could not have found most of this info without your help.

First, don't worry, you've convinced me, I'M not cleaning it!! We have a local man who is 2nd generation jeweler, I think I'll call him and see if he can work on it or if he knows someone, maybe I can work a deal where he does a little at a time.

I think it's safe to say the following about this watch:
Pre 1919 (as the note indicates, I wish the original owners name was on it, I would seek out his family and return it to them.)
Swiss movement (probably won't find maker)
Swiss case (with a mystery German mark)
.800 silver with maybe gold guilding
blue steel hands
probably fixable for the right price

What have I missed?

Thank you again for all of your help.

Sandy
 

jfl

Registered User
NAWCC Member
May 1, 2006
85
0
6
The german hallmark means that the watch could be marketed in Germany. The movement is a lever type and looks to be a 15j. The case repair would have to be performed by a jeweler with a laser welder. I do not try to clean cases such as these (called Galonne). If a stem/crown can be found the little screw by the winder/main spring barrel will hold it in place. The very first thing to check is if the balance assembly is in good shape, if not then the cost for repair is not practical. The last suggestion I have is to check ebay under swiss watches and look at the works of each. Sooner or later you will see your movement and perhaps be lucky enough to identify it. Even a name (model like Taurus the car) will when looked up in Pritchard tell you the manufacturer. Best of luck. JFL
 
Our 2021 National Meeting in Hampton Roads Virginia
Topic related ad experiment
Know Your NAWCC Forums Rules!
RULES & GUIDELINES

Find member

Forum statistics

Threads
160,891
Messages
1,395,863
Members
82,895
Latest member
MDHusker
Encyclopedia Pages
1,099
Total wiki contributions
2,787
Last category
Pocket Watches by Clint Geller