Need help thanks to my with hand tension

whatgoesaround

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Jan 22, 2008
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I need help yet again from the experts here on this forum. Thanks to my own stupidity, I did not notice where the diamond shaped tension part goes when I disassembled my clock, plate 1471. I have tried reassembling it in the only ways I can see how it could possibly fit and I obviously am not seeing all the ways, because the tension will not allow the clock to run.I am fairly certain (did I mention my own stupidity earlier?) it goes along the hand shaft, but . . . I do know it has to be between the front plate and the clock face. I need enlightenment.:D Thanks in advance.
 

whatgoesaround

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Re: Need help with hand tension

Update: Apparently I had the tension correctly seated, but there were troubles elsewhere. Troubles with an "s." After spending most of my day trying different ideas, I finally got it running early this evening and it is still going now, so all seems well. I did learn how to reassemble it in much quicker time by the end of the day:). It is a great looking clock.
 

Paul Tummers

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Re: Need help with hand tension

Update: Apparently I had the tension correctly seated, but there were troubles elsewhere. Troubles with an "s." After spending most of my day trying different ideas, I finally got it running early this evening and it is still going now, so all seems well. I did learn how to reassemble it in much quicker time by the end of the day:). It is a great looking clock.
What was the real problem? I still cannot put the movement together fast, for some reason I do have to work wheel by wheel and carefully guide each pinion to its bearing working my way from the spring drum upwards to the anchor.
Can you post pictures of your clock?
Kind Regards,
Paul T.
 

whatgoesaround

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It was a series of adjustments, Paul. I kept getting the anchor pin to rock the gears if I put a little pressure on the third gear, so I knew it would work, but I was losing force somewhere. I found that an extra housing on the front of the front plate, behind the face was a little crooked. I finally got that seated correctly, but it would only work intermittently. i kept looking and looking and could find nothing wrong. I had the mainspring out, everything. I noticed that the eccentric nut had markings and was so tempted to think that it had been moved(what a mistake that would have been!) except for the fact that the extra pressure was making it function when applied to the third wheel. Finally, after an entire afternoon of fiddling, I thought of the fact that I had to order a new anchor from Horolovar that was exceptional in that it had a very tiny pinion. It was the second attempt they had made to get the correct size to me and were hoping it would work. So I thought that it was tighter than perhaps it should be so I applied a little force to pull ouwards on the two plates. This was all it needed. I, too, have to go one by one with the pinions; I just meant that that process seemed to go much smoother, since I had been doing it all day long. I hope I can attach a couple of pictures, as you requested. I really love the tiny face and the writing.
 

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John Hubby

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FWIW, your clock is one of the earliest of the clocks marketed by the Bowler & Burdick Co. of Cleveland, OH (B&B) as shown on the dial. Although the Repair Guide states that Plate 1471 was made by Jahresuhren-Fabrik (JUF), my research indicates that it was more likely made by Andreas Huber.

B&B had the idea initially to import complete clocks, we believe first from the Andreas Huber Co in the late 1890's and then possibly from Jahresuhren-Fabrik. They followed that with import only of the movements including from JUF, Ph. Hauck, and Kienzle, and mounted them in imported high-grade French cases. They made their own dials and many of their own pendulums starting around 1901. The dial on your clock has been documented to have been used from about 1898 to 1902.

Does your clock by chance have a paper label pasted to the bottom of the base? B&B put a label on the clocks they sold giving date of sale and other info.
 

Paul Tummers

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Dec 25, 2008
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It was a series of adjustments, Paul. I kept getting the anchor pin to rock the gears if I put a little pressure on the third gear, so I knew it would work, but I was losing force somewhere. I found that an extra housing on the front of the front plate, behind the face was a little crooked. I finally got that seated correctly, but it would only work intermittently. i kept looking and looking and could find nothing wrong. I had the mainspring out, everything. I noticed that the eccentric nut had markings and was so tempted to think that it had been moved(what a mistake that would have been!) except for the fact that the extra pressure was making it function when applied to the third wheel. Finally, after an entire afternoon of fiddling, I thought of the fact that I had to order a new anchor from Horolovar that was exceptional in that it had a very tiny pinion. It was the second attempt they had made to get the correct size to me and were hoping it would work. So I thought that it was tighter than perhaps it should be so I applied a little force to pull ouwards on the two plates. This was all it needed. I, too, have to go one by one with the pinions; I just meant that that process seemed to go much smoother, since I had been doing it all day long. I hope I can attach a couple of pictures, as you requested. I really love the tiny face and the writing.
Thank you! I am still learning and probably will keep on doing so the rest of my life, so everything somebody else has experienced is a lesson for me.
Your clock is a real gem, only- it is in the wrong place:D!

Kind Regards,
Paul T.
 

whatgoesaround

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Jan 22, 2008
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FWIW, your clock is one of the earliest of the clocks marketed by the Bowler & Burdick Co. of Cleveland, OH (B&B) as shown on the dial. Although the Repair Guide states that Plate 1471 was made by Jahresuhren-Fabrik (JUF), my research indicates that it was more likely made by Andreas Huber.

B&B had the idea initially to import complete clocks, we believe first from the Andreas Huber Co in the late 1890's and then possibly from Jahresuhren-Fabrik. They followed that with import only of the movements including from JUF, Ph. Hauck, and Kienzle, and mounted them in imported high-grade French cases. They made their own dials and many of their own pendulums starting around 1901. The dial on your clock has been documented to have been used from about 1898 to 1902.

Does your clock by chance have a paper label pasted to the bottom of the base? B&B put a label on the clocks they sold giving date of sale and other info.
Sorry, Mr. Hubby, there is no paper label on the bottom of the base. When I saw that dial and knew the little bit of history in the Horolovar book of B&B, I felt it was something special. Thanks for connecting me with the history of this clock; it made my day.
 

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