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Need help in identifying of clock maker

myasnik

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Mar 3, 2017
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Hello,
Can anyone tell me about this clock? On the platina stamped initials "FC". Most likely this is a "Pendule de Paris" (movement of Paris), about 1830-1850 years.
Thanks in advance,
Dmitriy.

086de0c2bd738c18429c42e02e1ca1d7.jpg 5ba12f9de31c7542fbe27ec7c30515b3.jpg 568167d90f1fc1177313aece7eb347fe.jpg 9e72d5644727302679f6d9a17114b89b.jpg 2d4c4b9cd9f303a04c4d9c24d32f6571.jpg
 

Andy Dervan

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Hi Dmitriy,

Most of these movements were made in factories well outside of Paris and were shipped to Paris where clockmaker/retailer would install them in a case. This style movement was made for 150+ years.

I will look later in my trademark book and Tardy if there is someone/company that can be traced to "FC".

Andy Dervan
 
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myasnik

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Mar 3, 2017
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Hi Dmitriy,

Most of these movements were made in factories well outside of Paris and were shipped to Paris where clockmaker/retailer would install them in a case. This style movement was made for 150+ years.

I will look later in my trademark book and Tardy if there is someone/company that can be traced to "FC".

Andy Dervan
Thanks a lot, Andy. I'l be waiting.
 

jmclaugh

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I have seen the mark FC before on a pendule de Paris movement but as far as I know it is not known who it belonged to. Many roulants (unfinished movements) were finished in Paris which typically involved the escapement, in my opinion FC is very likely the finisher. It is an impressive looking clock and looks like it should have a glass dome.

If you haven't already seen it here's another one.
 
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myasnik

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Mar 3, 2017
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I have seen the mark FC before on a pendule de Paris movement but as far as I know it is not known who it belonged to. Many roulants (unfinished movements) were finished in Paris which typically involved the escapement, in my opinion FC is very likely the finisher. It is an impressive looking clock and looks like it should have a glass dome.

If you haven't already seen it here's another one.
Thank you so much!
But the question is still open ((
 

new2clocks

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Last edited:
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myasnik

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Mar 3, 2017
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It is an impressive looking clock and looks like it should have a glass dome.
Yes, there was most likely a glass dome: there is a groove on the wooden box for its installation. But it has been lost, unfortunately ...
 

Andy Dervan

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I checked European Tradenames for "FC" - nothing.

I checked Tardy - nothing.

I am not sure of the "finisher" explanation. Movements made/assembled for sale were often unsigned on the outside, however occasionally on the inside of plates and/or barrels are sometimes stamped or have initials of person who actually constructed the movement.

Andy Dervan
 

myasnik

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Mar 3, 2017
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I checked European Tradenames for "FC" - nothing.

I checked Tardy - nothing.

I am not sure of the "finisher" explanation. Movements made/assembled for sale were often unsigned on the outside, however occasionally on the inside of plates and/or barrels are sometimes stamped or have initials of person who actually constructed the movement.

Andy Dervan
Andy, thanks a lot for your time. It seems that this question has no answer ...
Regards,
Dmitriy.
 

Andy Dervan

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By 2nd quarter 19th century when this clock was assembled - the movements were supplied completed and basically just required inserting them into cases. There was little finishing required compared to 50 -75 years early when some were supplied as ebauches and actually required finishing.

Andy Dervan
 

Andy Dervan

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It would be interesting to disassemble the movement and look for any true maker marks.

Andy Dervan
 

jmclaugh

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By 2nd quarter 19th century when this clock was assembled - the movements were supplied completed and basically just required inserting them into cases. There was little finishing required compared to 50 -75 years early when some were supplied as ebauches and actually required finishing.

Andy Dervan
So according to you from 1825 none of these movements were supplied as roulants. May I ask how you know this?
 
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Andy Dervan

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The clock market was segmented high, medium, and low pricing so clock makers supplied clocks to the various market had cost constraints.

High and medium costing clocks came through shops in Paris. The clock in the thread is probably medium market - good quality, but unsigned so it could retailed at more modest prices. Clockmaker/assembler did not have liberty as higher end makers to lavish fancy finishing on a movement before he installed in lavish case, but he acquired a completed movement or something very close that he could utilize it with minimal effort.

It is economics. It happened in US - where did many of the higher end clocks and timepiece movements produced in cities like Boston came from - small clockmakers is smaller towns supplying them ready to go on contract. Robert Cheney asserted many later Willard tall clock movements were imported from England and were installed in cases.

Andy Dervan
 

Steven Thornberry

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The clock market was segmented high, medium, and low pricing so clock makers supplied clocks to the various market had cost constraints.

High and medium costing clocks came through shops in Paris. The clock in the thread is probably medium market - good quality, but unsigned so it could retailed at more modest prices. Clockmaker/assembler did not have liberty as higher end makers to lavish fancy finishing on a movement before he installed in lavish case, but he acquired a completed movement or something very close that he could utilize it with minimal effort.

It is economics. It happened in US - where did many of the higher end clocks and timepiece movements produced in cities like Boston came from - small clockmakers is smaller towns supplying them ready to go on contract. Robert Cheney asserted many later Willard tall clock movements were imported from England and were installed in cases.

Andy Dervan
I think Jonathan wants to know if you have a specific reference source for this information.
 

D.th.munroe

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It could be just coincidence but I have seen FC on a Pons movement, (which this one very closely resembles) there was a couple online, also marked FC but the links are dead. Which would probably point to the FC being the finisher.
 
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