Need help getting a Hall anniversary clock to work...

Discussion in '400-Day & Atmos' started by Siobhan, Jan 29, 2019.

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  1. Siobhan

    Siobhan New Member

    Jan 29, 2019
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    Hello~ I recently inherited my late grandmother's Hall Craft Corp. Anniversary clock (stamped with REX on back plate), but I have absolutely no idea how it works. I posted a pic to show what it looks like if it helps. I did find taped to the bottom of the clock a tiny brass square piece which has a pin through it, so I'm assuming it's of some importance, just not sure what... if someone here can help me get this beauty working again, I'd sure appreciate it Thanks much!! 15488220781702450150105757439195.jpg 15488220977194057121701515853092.jpg 15488221156547425070080712505365.jpg 15488221330448380074561314864763.jpg
     
  2. etmb61

    etmb61 Registered User
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    Oct 25, 2010
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    Hello and welcome to our message board.

    Your clock was made by Uhrenfabrik Herr around 1951 (that's plate number 1484 for those following along at home).

    The suspension spring on you clock is broken, that's the thin wire inside the tube on the back of the clock. The tiny brass block should be attached to the bottom of the suspension spring, but the spring is probably too short now to do that and the spring will need to be replaced. That's probably all it needs to get it going again. Unfortunately our repair guide lists two spring sizes and four different arrangements for the suspension spring parts for your clock's plate number. It would probably be easier for you to find a clock shop in your local area to replace the spring for you and make any necessary adjustments. They should be able to clean and lubricate it as well as show you how to set it up.

    Eric
     
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  3. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    Oct 19, 2005
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    If you could remove the suspension spring guard from the back plate (its the round tube looking thing) and remove the suspension spring (top has a screw that you remove), and then measure what you have left from the top of the block to the bottom of the spring, and then measure the bottom block that was taped to your clock, we could probably offer a reasonable guess on which spring you need and point you toward where you could purchase a whole unit to replace the one you have.
     
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  4. KurtinSA

    KurtinSA Registered User
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    Nov 24, 2014
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    If I see things right in the guide, the four different suspension units all have the same amount of spring associated with them...about 4.25" of exposed spring. Seems like the only real difference in the pictures of the suspension units is for the fork...never really figured forks made that much difference. Also, why different thickness springs for basically the same setup...the main spring is all the same.

    If I can read it right, the regulation for time appears to be backwards that most clocks. Appendix 106 mentions this about plate 1676 and it suggests unit 27B. 1676 doesn't have the logo but does have two extra holes to hold the lower suspension bracket...I'm guessing on plate 1484, the lower bracket slides into the fasteners that hold the movement down.

    Not sure if that helps any...

    Kurt
     
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  5. Kevin W.

    Kevin W. Registered User
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    Apr 11, 2002
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    These are not the easiest clocks to repair, as you will have to put it in beat, and then without a service, it may go or it may not. A good job to pass onto a repair person, if you have no experience.
     
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  6. Siobhan

    Siobhan New Member

    Jan 29, 2019
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    Thank you for all the helpful replies! After much thought (and the fact I know nothing about clocks), I've decided to take Eric and Kevin's advice and have the local clock shop take a look and see if they can get it working like it should... Thanks again!
     
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