Need advice for an E. W. Adams 8 day weight clock repair

TimelyFool

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Oct 2, 2017
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Hello-

Need advice for an E. W. Adams 8 day weight clock repair

Two months ago I acquired an 8 day weight clock. Label says it is made by E. W. Adams of Seneca Falls, N.Y. A triple decker, cornice and column. 22” x 37.5” x 6”. Possibly made in the middle 1840s. Has good veneer and Animal Feet. The middle door has a fun-house mirrored panel. The case interior is covered with technical notes penciled in and ranging from the mid 1880s. Also written in is a little detailed information about former owners. More was found on aged paper notes inside case. It is a lovey piece in spite of showing its age, a potential working centerpiece of my collection.

I cleaned the case it, made a few repairs and ordered two replacement Terry keys for the doors. I removed the movement and gave it a bath in lacquer thinner before an hour’s dip in the ultrasonic tub and oiled. Then I remounted it to be parallel with the case. Clock was leveled on the work table.

The strap movement is a type like nothing I’ve seen before in my collection or for sale on eBay. The winding posts are just slightly lower than the hand shaft. I replaced the pendulum rod and spring and adjusted the crutch and its loop. Try as I would, the only way I could set the clock to beat was to bend the rod to one side to off center it. Still, it would only run for a few minutes and then stop. Although novice I still am I have put many clocks in beat and got them to work. I failed with this clock. Never had so much trouble.

Possible cause…. the 42 teeth of the escape wheel seems a bit worn and very slightly bent at the tips. Its pivot has considerable play and wobbles greatly from side to side with finger pressure. I have not yet mounted the courage to rebush a clock but because I need not separate the plates with this repair, here might be a good place to start. Other bushings seem reasonable. I have seen worst ones in clocks merrily keeping time in my house. The verge faces looks good and probably the verge was replaced. But is it the correct one for the clock? I can buy a new matched replacement verge and wheel set from Timesaver. Justin at Timesaver sent me the specs for their 42 teeth replacements. Very nearly the same dimensions to the originals. I suppose there will be some tweaking necessary with the installation of any new verge and wheel contact each other. Beyond polishing the faces, some adjusting to be done their angles. Perhaps it's time to seek a seasoned technician.

But wait, there’s more…… A small spur gear which I still have has broken off from an end of a shaft that projects just outside the front plate. It connects to and drives the count wheel. The shaft is now shortened with to not enough metal left outside the plate to remount the gear. A repair required I think would be a remanufacturing of the shaft / gear assembly to restore the chime side. The shaft also holds several other gears. Hoping they can be pulled and reinstalled on a replacement shaft. A replacement shaft from a movement now in someone's bone yard would be much easier.

I would consider sending the movement to anyone skilled with repairing these old strap movements. Or look for someone who might have a working copy of the movement to sell, maybe taking in my movement for parts. I would not be interested in a different 8 day weight movement of a different form factor as it would require a redesign of the case's interior and to drill new winding holes in the face. There are many such movements listed on eBay.

If anyone out there can offer any repair wisdom I would be very grateful. Also, I would like to know more on the history of this manufacturer E. W. Adams.Thanks.

Timely Fool.

me in clock.jpg mirror clock overview.jpg cornice mirror clock.JPG movement to 8 day mirrored tripple-decker clock.jpg broken shaft which held gear (we have).jpg funhouse clocksucker.jpg spur gear for E.W.jpg spur gear for E.W.jpg
 

Uhralt

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Sep 4, 2008
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I would suggest not to replace the escape wheel but to straighten the teeth which can be done easily with small smooth needle nose pliers. The wobbly pivot hole should be bushed. That might be all that's needed to get the clock running. The broken arbor needs somebody with a lathe and experience to repair, so it would be good to have this done professionally. During this repair the clock should be completely taken apart (needs to be done anyway for the repair of the arbor) cleaned and bushed where necessary.

Uhralt
 

TimelyFool

Registered User
Oct 2, 2017
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Fox River Grove, IL
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Thank You Uhralt for taking the time to respond. I have found a technician who works out of his home fairly near me in suburban Chicago. He has the movement now and is going to re-bush the escape wheel and a few others. And will check for other problems, the myriad of things that a 180 year old clockwork might need. Mine maybe a more upscale movement. Some of the major wheels seem like they were milled, not stamped. Also, the plate's riveted brass strapping seem a bit heavier than in others I have seen.

About the broken off spur gear that drives the count wheel....

It might be possible the technition says to shift the shaft between the plates to lengthen its protruding end that broke off to have enough metal to remount the gear. We will see.

Timely
 

Willie X

Registered User
Feb 9, 2008
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The broken extended pivot can be replaced. Same as a repivot job but sometimes this type pivot will be larger than normal compared to the diameter of the arbor. If the arbor is on the large side, you won't have a problem.

That's a very nice movement, overall it looks pretty good.

Willie X
 

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