Neat Old E.N. Welch

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by wow, Jun 14, 2019.

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  1. wow

    wow Registered User
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    #1 wow, Jun 14, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
    Here is a nice old 30 hour shelf clock a customer asked me to get running. They and I want to know more about its origin. The movement shows a patent of Aug. 30, 1870. No label on the back. Is the angle mounted alarm movement right? How about that club tooth escapement? Anybody have a model name and age for the clock?
    Thanks, Will

    EDC407B8-F9FF-4735-862A-38A8CA77E382.jpeg EFBBF9DE-143A-4B83-8BCE-66EF7B060A0A.jpeg F6C791BA-CF81-4CE3-90C0-A244CC1FE576.jpeg 971579A9-8D7C-4FAF-B903-6D5F662CD887.jpeg 2FC47310-D84A-4328-B74A-1296CA69C8DC.jpeg
     
  2. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    This appears to be an Italian No. 2, a product of Welch, Spring & Co. What is the height?

    E.N. Welch and Solomon C. Spring formed the company to offer clocks of a higher quality. The firm lasted until 1884, when it was absorbed into the parent company, the E. N. Welch Manufacturing Co. Unless, you can find additional mounting holes for the alarm movement, I would accept it as originally placed that way. Sometimes inventive measures were necessary to install them in some cases. Apparently the Italian No. 2 used the upper wooden bezel and the hexagon shaped lower door between 1868 and 1877, when it was eliminated in favor of a plain-glass single door.

    I can't find a suitable patent for March 17, 1868, and have to wonder whether it might be a mistake for November 17, 1868, when a patent was granted to S.C. Spring for a somewhat different clock, although the patent document shows a similar bottom door, which might account for the patent reference.

    D3253 Clock Case.pdf

    The club tooth escapement is what is covered by the August 30, 1870, patent. It was granted to B.B. Lewis. BTW, don't be concerned by the mistaken date of August 31, 1870, on the cover sheet.

    US106843 Clock Escapement.pdf

    BTW, Owen and Joi Burt's excellent Bulletin Supplement (No. 12, Feb. 1878) is an excellent reference on Welch, Spring & Co. It shows some Italian models on page 13, fig. 15. There is discussion on pp. 12-14 of the Italians. It is accessible online, but it comes in several parts.
     

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  3. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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  4. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Thanks, Steven. You are so helpful. After further study of the alarm and gong set-up, I wonder if the bell was the only thing there. There is a hole in the backboard to the left of the gong base. Perhaps that is where the bell was originally and there was no gong. The alarm hammer being bent like it is is unusual. Both the strike hammer and the alarm struck the bell? Many old Seth Thomas clocks struck a bell rather than a gong. What do you think
     
  5. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    #5 Steven Thornberry, Jun 14, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019
    Short of seeing it in person, I would accept it as the original setup, but then I can't explain the extra hole. Look at this one for comparison.

    Antique Clock Details

    BTW, does the extra hole appear to have been used for anything?
     
  6. wow

    wow Registered User
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    I think someone installed a different gong which was larger than the original and it touched the alarm movement. They moved the gong base over to the right so it would not touch. That hole is one of the original gong base mounting holes.
     
  7. Steven Thornberry

    Steven Thornberry User Administrator
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    That makes sense. Good analysis.
     

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