Name These Tools!

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by Laurie Kimble, Nov 8, 2018.

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  1. Laurie Kimble

    Laurie Kimble Registered User
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    Jan 30, 2011
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    I recently acquired a box of tools that I cannot identify. I would appreciate any help you could give me. Thanks for sharing your knowledge!

    105_8392.JPG 105_8393.JPG 105_8397.JPG 105_8395.JPG 105_8398.JPG 105_8394.JPG
     
  2. Dave Coatsworth

    Dave Coatsworth Super Moderator
    NAWCC Business Donor Sponsor

    Feb 11, 2005
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    Photo #4 is a counterbore/countersink set (first time I have seen a combined set)

    Photo #6 is a balance truing caliper
     
  3. Laurie Kimble

    Laurie Kimble Registered User
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    Jan 30, 2011
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    That was fast! Thanks Dave! What is the primary purpose of the countersink set?

    I am not familiar with that style of balance truing caliper.
     
  4. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

    Mar 29, 2011
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    Photo no. 3 shows a vice/anvil combination for stretching wheels. The tool would be held in the bench-vice.

    Do you have a picture that shows the tool in no. 1/2 from the front ? In any case it seems to intended to be held in the bench-vice too.

    The countersinks are used to fashion the countersunk holes for countersunk screw-heads. The little wheels have sharp edges that act like scrapers. The other insert tools are used to make cylindrical countersinks or, if the brass guidance-pins are removed, can be used to shorten screw-heads from underneath, as you would do with rose-cutters in the lathe.
     
  5. Laurie Kimble

    Laurie Kimble Registered User
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    Jan 30, 2011
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    Wefalck,

    Thanks for your clear explanation of the countersinks and cutters set.

    Not familiar with 'stretching wheels.' I have used flat jaw pliers to elongate short teeth on clock escape wheels but not sure if that is what you mean.

    I have attached a picture of the front of the tool in the first 2 pictures.
    105_8377.JPG
     
  6. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

    Mar 29, 2011
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    Yes, making teeth longer is what I meant. Your tool is a simple version of a variety of gadgets that were/are on the market for the pupose. I gather it is one step up in positive tool control from using pliers. There other versions, where the stamping tool is guided like in an upright drilling tool.

    As to the other tool: it looks a bit familiar, but flicking through my 110 year old tool catalogue I didn't see anything like it. It is certainly pre-1880 or so, judging by the style of the knurled nuts. I first thought it might part of a topping tool, but the vane for fixing it in a vice doesn't seem to go with this. I wonder, whether it might be a machine to be used with the so-called Ingold Fraises for cutting wheels ?
    Ingold Fraise. From the estate of noted watchmaker Dennis Harmon | eBay

    INGOLD FRAISE

    The straight items on picture no. 5 could be spare centres. Would they fit ?
     
  7. Neilywatch

    Neilywatch Registered User
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    Oct 13, 2011
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    Hi - Picture #5 are jewelers tools - these are used to make graining and beading on rings. Hope this helps! Neil
     
  8. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

    Mar 29, 2011
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    Oh, yes, the ones on the left are 'millegrain wheels', if they have little embossed wheels at the end.
     
  9. Laurie Kimble

    Laurie Kimble Registered User
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    Jan 30, 2011
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    Thank you Neil and wefalck! So Picture #5 is not horological tools but jeweler's tools. Yes, the ones on the left do have little wheels at the end.

    I looked up the Ingold Fraise. Wow! $2,500!! That is one expensive tool. I don't think it matches what I have though I sure wish I did have one!

    A friend just found something in Crom's book that might be similar to pictures 1 & 2. Could it be a tool for dressing the back of the cylinder escape tooth to the correct angle? The one in the book is dated about 1820.
     
  10. wefalck

    wefalck Registered User

    Mar 29, 2011
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    It is actually the Ingold-milling cutters that are so expensive, because they are difficult to make and not made anymore to the best of my knowledge.
     

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