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My shelf clocks - Guess which one is running?

Tom McIntyre

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Two Seth Thomas, Wadsworth, Lounsberry & Turners, Sperry & Shaw with an 8 day Barraud.
They all will run but only one will keep time better than two minutes a week.
 

Chris Radano

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Hmm, I suspect this is a trick question. Since they all read different times in the photo.
My guess is the 8 day cottage clock, second from right. Based on taking a blind guess.
No offense, I like French clocks but I know it's not the French clock.
How's the Barraud running?
 

FDelGreco

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I'd say it is the clock in the center. It's closest to the time that you made your post.

Frank
 

rmarkowitz1_cee4a1

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View attachment 632085
Two Seth Thomas, Wadsworth, Lounsberry & Turners, Sperry & Shaw with an 8 day Barraud.
They all will run but only one will keep time better than two minutes a week.
I don't know which clock you choose to keep running though I suspect the 8 day shelf regulator as being more convenient rather than a 30 hour clock which you would need to wind daily. More "watch like" than the others?

I would probably run the Barraud regularly, though I do like clocks that chime.

RM
 

Tom McIntyre

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I like French clocks but I know it's not the French clock.
Chris, I did not think of that part of the quiz. There is no French clock. The two smaller ones are both Seth Thomas.:) The fancy one is signed Seth Thomas' Sons (as was the factory they were both made in.)
 
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Tom McIntyre

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Actually Frank guessed, but he sort of cheated by looking at the back of the picture. :)

I have had the Barraud running for over a year now. It has a Flammenville escapement, which is a dead beat verge. It has an uncompensated balance and keeps time in my house to better than 2 minutes/week. Adjusting the regulator is the most difficult part but my real interest is in stability of rate. I have not yet set up my Microset to get some really accurate measurement of the rate.

It was made in 1818.
 

FDelGreco

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Actually Frank guessed, but he sort of cheated by looking at the back of the picture.
Tom: I didn't cheat. The clock read about 1:10 and you posted at 1:39, so it made sense. How do you look at the back of a picture?

Frank
 

Chris Radano

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Well, I over thought the question. The Barraud is the most expensive, highest quality, and most massive timepiece of the lot. Personally I own a Barraud & Lund twin fusee bracket clock. I forget the serial number of my clock offhand, but it dates in the 1850s. Fabulous quality.
Tom, I thought you said earlier the Barraud's escapement had a finite life span.
Seth Thomas and Sons look French.
Some of the modest USA clocks can be accurate timekeepers.
 

Tom McIntyre

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I have it from Fortunat Mueller-Maerki that the story of the disappearance of the Flammenville was due to pallet wear causing a loss of the deadbeat performance. Richard Ketchen restored the "verge" for me after convincing himself from the sparse literature that the 180 deg. palette angle was specific to that escapement. I will be happy if it lasts another 20 or 30 years.

When I discussed this with David Penney, he said there were quite a few English verges with the rounded pallets and if they exhibited recoil, most English collectors considered them to be verges. I have not followed up with David on the palette angle question. I am not sure what reference Richard found for that.
 

Tom McIntyre

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How do you look at the back of a picture?
I thought you had looked at the EXIF data from the image file. Sorry for questioning your integrity. If I had been more clever, I could have waited until the next morning to post the image here. :)
 

FDelGreco

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If I had been more clever, I could have waited until the next morning to post the image here. :)
Of course, it wouldn't have helped if you waited 12 hours! <grin>
Frank