My own 400 day clock, pics.

Kypros

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This is my pride and joy, my personal 400 Day one. I don't know its value or worth, but I fixed it and it runs fine for a couple of months now. I had to find a new suspension spring for it, which was provided by my trainer, (he just happened to have a loose one, which I cut to the right length). Adjusting the weights inside, I made it keep time.
 
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KurtinSA

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Thanks for the pictures. It appears the clock is a Huber, although I'm not sure if this could be a Huber design used by Kienzle. If you can provide the serial number, someone may be able to provide more information as well as a date.

Kurt
 
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Kypros

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Thanks for the pictures. It appears the clock is a Huber, although I'm not sure if this could be a Huber design used by Kienzle. If you can provide the serial number, someone may be able to provide more information as well as a date.

Kurt
The serial number is 40216 and thank you for taking the time and effort in identifying it.
 

MartinM

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If the S/N is one assigned by Kienzle, the date would be mid March of 1931.
But, that seems a bit late for this clock according to my gut.
 

Kypros

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If the S/N is one assigned by Kienzle, the date would be mid March of 1931.
But, that seems a bit late for this clock according to my gut.
MartinM. I didn't make up the SN. Could this clock be an even earlier one? I have no clue as I'm new to this hobby.
 

KurtinSA

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Could you show a clear picture from the sides of the clock, so we can see the movement?

Kurt
 

KurtinSA

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I've read that Huber clocks began using lantern pinions with pin pallet movements after a patent expired (DRGM 502714) in early 1915. Given that the war was going on, likely your clock is dated to shortly after WWI.

As for polishing the brass, I'm sure a few others will chime in with their methods. The base on your clock is quite tarnished with the old lacquer having turned colors. To cut through that I would probably try using acetone but be careful with the fumes and do it outside. If the base has an internal piece of wood for stiffness, be careful it doesn't soak up the liquid. On tough cases, I've used a gel-like paint stripper. Once I get through that, I use a metal polish such as Simichrome or Blue Magic to slowly polish the surfaces. I wrap a finger in a micro fiber cloth and dip it into the polish past. Wipe on and wipe off! Be sure to fully clean the whole area to get any residue off. This removes the old lacquer so you should follow up with a wax or spraying another coat of lacquer. There was a recent thread on use of lacquer.

Lacquer for brass | NAWCC Forums

I notice that your fork is angled where it contacts the anchor pin. If the clock runs fine, maybe leave it alone. However, this probably requires extra power to run the clock. It might perform better if you were to level the fork out.

Kurt
 

Kypros

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I've read that Huber clocks began using lantern pinions with pin pallet movements after a patent expired (DRGM 502714) in early 1915. Given that the war was going on, likely your clock is dated to shortly after WWI.

As for polishing the brass, I'm sure a few others will chime in with their methods. The base on your clock is quite tarnished with the old lacquer having turned colors. To cut through that I would probably try using acetone but be careful with the fumes and do it outside. If the base has an internal piece of wood for stiffness, be careful it doesn't soak up the liquid. On tough cases, I've used a gel-like paint stripper. Once I get through that, I use a metal polish such as Simichrome or Blue Magic to slowly polish the surfaces. I wrap a finger in a micro fiber cloth and dip it into the polish past. Wipe on and wipe off! Be sure to fully clean the whole area to get any residue off. This removes the old lacquer so you should follow up with a wax or spraying another coat of lacquer. There was a recent thread on use of lacquer.

Lacquer for brass | NAWCC Forums

I notice that your fork is angled where it contacts the anchor pin. If the clock runs fine, maybe leave it alone. However, this probably requires extra power to run the clock. It might perform better if you were to level the fork out.

Kurt
Much obliged for the info, I'll certainly try to polish the base as you say, only I have to ask about lacquer in my remote part of the world.
 

etmb61

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That model is straight out of Kienzle's catalogs so I would say it was likely sold by them. I'm not sure if they (Kienzle/Huber) shared similar designs. Huber patented at least one of their case styles. Kienzle and Wurth had very similar looking styles from a distance, that are very different upon close examination. Huber did use Kienzle pendulums.

Does the bottom cover of the large pendulum disk have a saw cut out on the outer edge? If so, I think only Kienzle did that.

Eric
 

Kypros

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That model is straight out of Kienzle's catalogs so I would say it was likely sold by them. I'm not sure if they (Kienzle/Huber) shared similar designs. Huber patented at least one of their case styles. Kienzle and Wurth had very similar looking styles from a distance, that are very different upon close examination. Huber did use Kienzle pendulums.

Does the bottom cover of the large pendulum disk have a saw cut out on the outer edge? If so, I think only Kienzle did that.

Eric
Yes, indeed it does have a cut on the outer edge. If it's a Klenzer, what is its real value? I bought it about 7 years ago for $100 if I remember correctly. I had a choice of three, the other two having the ball weights. This appealed more to my aesthetics.
 

etmb61

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Yes, indeed it does have a cut on the outer edge. If it's a Klenzer, what is its real value? I bought it about 7 years ago for $100 if I remember correctly. I had a choice of three, the other two having the ball weights. This appealed more to my aesthetics.
I would say that's a fair price given its condition. I can see the mainspring barrel is damaged from a failure of some kind, so there could be other problems.
barrel damage.jpg

Eric
 

KurtinSA

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Given the spring that appears on the center arbor, this looks more like a Huber movement. That's part of the clutch mechanism for moving the minute hand. I can't find that arrangement in the Kienzle clocks that I've overhauled.

Kurt
 
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etmb61

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Given the spring that appears on the center arbor, this looks more like a Huber movement. That's part of the clutch mechanism for moving the minute hand. I can't find that arrangement in the Kienzle clocks that I've overhauled.

Kurt
Kienzle often has a solid pinion meshed with the barrel too.

These are so difficult to sort out.

Eric
 

etmb61

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What you see there on the barrel is a metal insert anchoring the spring inside.
Yes, and it catches the light like it's pushed out. It should be flush to the side of the barrel.

Eric
 

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