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TimWK

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Nov 20, 2019
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I found this case with the no name grand sonnorie movement, pendulum and weights at an estate sale. I have several questions, 1. When was it made? 2. It has two big shrinkage cracks, and I would like to know if there is anything I can do to make then go away or do I just leave them. it is also missing the top left side trim.

Best Regards IMG_0664.JPG IMG_0652.JPG IMG_0653.JPG IMG_0657.JPG IMG_0658.JPG IMG_0651.JPG IMG_0661.JPG IMG_0663.JPG
 

daveR

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There are methods of closing up the cracks and I think you may have to attend to them as they are inline with each other which means the door will be weakened on one side. I think in any case it will involve removing the glass first especially if it is in any way old glass. I would send this overto the case restoration group where you will find many more experienced contributors than I to give you a more useful answer.
David
 

Betzel

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Nice. Seems a very unusual style, and though I'm pretty new at this, I don't think I've seen any quite like it.

If Gaudí ever tried to do an unusual regulator, is this what he would have made? Sorry about the door, but it should come out, and be well worth restoring. Seems in good general shape.

Do the strikes sound very different hitting the coil in different spots, or are they similar?

Good luck with the glass and door!
 

jmclaugh

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Nice serpentine style case, my understanding is they date from around 1850-85 and earlier ones had movements mounted to wooden platforms that slide into wooden supports mounted to the backboard which yours appears to. The cracks don't look that bad to me but best to consult someone who does case restoration. Which trim do you think it is missing?
 
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Betzel

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Which trim do you think it is missing?
Hard to see, but the crown moulding that follows to the right in the first photo, appears missing on the left (in the second).

Wonder what kind of wood? Mahogany? Would be interesting to know. Hopefully, rounded parts are easier to copy than those with sharp angles and fine cuts...

Interesting comment on the back/seat board. Is the movement perhaps French? German?
 

John Arrowood

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Have you looked at the side of the gong support that is hidden from view, against the back plate? I have a very similar support which has the word Vien (Vienna) cast or stamped into the brass. If so, the clock is possibly Austrian. And the case may have been refinished from the original ebonized surface.
 

Ticktocktime100

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Hi,

With regard to the date, I think 1870's, as Ralph initially suggested, is spot on. My first thought upon seeing the clock was Austrian, so in that respect I agree with John also. I believe this case is referred to as a transitional style case, and I wouldn't be surprised if it was ebonised initially as the wood tone isn't what you'd expect. In any case, a very fine clock indeed.

Regards.
 

Jim DuBois

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There was a time when many of us might condsider a clock purchase to be an "investment." Sadly, those days are long gone, for most clocks. I consider all the clocks I buy these days as expenditures. On occasion a clock may return a modest payback, but often not the case. I just look at my clocks in terms of golf games not played, advanced degrees not sought, or vacations to wonderful locations not taken, etc.
 
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jmclaugh

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Hard to see, but the crown moulding that follows to the right in the first photo, appears missing on the left (in the second).

Wonder what kind of wood? Mahogany? Would be interesting to know. Hopefully, rounded parts are easier to copy than those with sharp angles and fine cuts...

Interesting comment on the back/seat board. Is the movement perhaps French? German?
My understanding is many of these cases were made from cheap woods which often had a red undercoat and were then stained in black or brown. It's a nice serpentine style case though.

I'd think it's Austrian.
 

musicguy

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TimWK

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I’m sorry for not answering any questions before now byt it’s been a very hectic week. I will try and answer the questions in the order they were posted.

1. Thanks Ralph.

2. daver I’ll post the question about the cracks in the prorate fourm.

3. Betzel, there are two strike coils, one on each side of the brass coil holder which is attached to the seat board.

4. jmclaugh, thanks for the comment

5. Betzel, I‘m postin a picture of the missing molding. Don’t know what type of wood , and I’m almost positive it’s Austrian or German.

6. John Arrowood, there are no markings on the side of the gong support but on the back of the support it is marked “ FKUNZ in WIEN “. If you look close it looks as if it might have been over stamped with a larger "K". The gong support is attached the seat board.

7 Tictoctime 100, If it was refinished it was a thorough job as I don’t see any trace of the original finish where the molding is missing.

8. Jim BuBois, thanks for your interesting comments, they hit home.

9. jmclaugh, thanks for your comments.

10. musicguy, I won’t

Thanks again for your comments.

Best Regards IMG_0687.JPG IMG_0685.JPG IMG_0686.JPG
 

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