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My lathe setup

NewBernWatchmaker

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Jun 1, 2018
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I am setting up the lathe using whatever table my wife said I could drill a hole through- a side table magazine rack. The motor is too fast so I have a cone pulley coming. I am hoping to get the slowest turn at around 500.

IMG_20180610_145315540.jpg
 

RJSoftware

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Apr 15, 2005
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I was hoping for you that it was a dc series (universal) motor. I dont think it is but i cant really make out text of blurry pic. Then you could go dc route but I have no experience in that. Others have said it eliminates the speed torque problem. but still might be costly.

You might want to go smaller, something like sewing machine attachment motor. Your motor looks more suited for a benchtop lathe which is more heavy duty. You might be ok with the motor but excessive large probably produces allot of vibration. Its worth a trying the motor though.

I take it that the smaller cone pulley you are ordering is for the motor shaft. From what I see so far I take it the motor will be below and feeding the above counter shaft.

If you install motor to desk frame using rubber pads then you might get smoother less vibration. This is important when viewing under magnification as vibration causes blurred view.

The belts/bands you choose also effect this as even the slightest bump from a belt joint makes vibration as bump from a belt can be a fewtimes each second.

The bestbeand/belt to use are the large rubber O-rings that are sold at most hardware stores in multi size kits. I think they are originally for water filters but grab them if you can.

The rubber O-,rings are seamless so no bump to contend with. Generally 4 to 8 inch diameters in varying thickness.

I have a post somewhere here on this site of my lathe setup which show my wood countershaft. Seeing it will help you simplify your arrangement if you wish.

Before you drill hole in desk another consideration is the advantages/drawbacks of a separate platform for lathe which sits on top of desk. A smaller motor attaches to it.

Two other design considerations are the height of the lathe spindle in relation to seat height + your height + binocular microscope ( highly recommended ) and neck angle comfort.

An adjustable seat height helps but you have to have its limitations in mind.

I will try to find pic here of mine. My counter shaft design is simple. About a 6 inch section of 2x4 sticks up from lathe table upright. A single bolt goes through 2x4 and serves as axle. The two pulleys are actually carved from one piece of solid wood. The small pulley is about 1 inch diameters, the large about 4. They both are one piece and turn on the bolt axle. The axle is stationary and does not turn. Since it only has 1 riser and open on other side band removal is easy not requiring any disassembly of counter-shaft.

Rj
 

geo.ulrich

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Apr 10, 2013
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A step pulley on motor and countershaft 3-4 different diameters will get you where you want small to big on motor and reverse on countershaft..
 

NewBernWatchmaker

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Jun 1, 2018
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New Bern, NC
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Yeah the cone pulley is for the countershaft. Basically once I get this setup in place I will check the end speed. If still too fast I will increase the driven pulley on the counter and then decrease the size of the motor pulley (I really don't like that adjustable one that's on it). Its an AC motor so I didn't want to use a rheostat on it but the counter should give me good torque considering how large the motor is relative to a sewing machine motor. A DC setup would be nice but this motor was 15 bucks...
 

DeweyC

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Feb 5, 2007
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My bias after 40 years is to keep it all simple. A Sherline motor with a user installed reversing switch and then connected to a foot switch. The only reason I see for a counter shaft (which takes up space) is if you want to use the grinder or the milling attachment. I have a pivot grinder with all the fixings for at least 20 years, never really used it other than for play. I admire Archie Perkins but I never had a need to resurface winding wheels and I final burnish pitos to size on the Jacot. Too much fussing to set the pivot polisher for a single pivot. Wheels are cut on a milling machine (Sherline works great for even small clocks) , but I use my 102 for most wheels and pinions though.

The Sherline motor gives 3 times as much torque as will ever be used on a WW eliminating the need to change pulleys. The foot switch means you set and forget your speed (slow is much better than fast). Mount the motor and and the lathe on a piece of 1/2 inch AL plate and you have portability with stability.

The motors are not cheap but they are all I use on small machines.

I know yo already started off on a path. This is just another to thnk about it.
 

RJSoftware

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Apr 15, 2005
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The rheostat works same as foot pedal just the foot pedal normally has a spring return. I dont think you have to worry about wattage as the load is very slight. The system I have works great as watchmaker lathes dont need all that much power.

Rj
 

DeweyC

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Oh. To be clear, I am recommending a Sherline Motor/Speed Control with a foot switch wired in. The foot rheostats are an annoyance to me. The combo I recommend allows you to find the best cutting speed for that particular job and then just turn the lathe on/off with your foot. The foot rheostats are too finicky and are best left to vintage sewing machines in my opinion.

BTW, found Grammarly for Chrome. Hopefully no need to interpret my posts from now on. Usually was not drunk, just lousy typing and in too much of a hurry.
 
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kevin h

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Apr 9, 2015
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Oh. To be clear, I am recommending a Sherline Motor/Speed Control with a foot switch wired in. The foot rheostats are an annoyance to me. The combo I recommend allows you to find the best cutting speed for that particular job and then just turn the lathe on/off with your foot. The foot rheostats are too finicky and are best left to vintage sewing machines in my opinion.

BTW, found Grammarly for Chrome. Hopefully no need to interpret my posts from now on. Usually was not drunk, just lousy typing and in too much of a hurry.
The foot pedal / motor combo that I have is really smooth , I believe I have a sewing motor and pedal assembly
 

karlmansson

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Apr 20, 2013
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The foot pedal / motor combo that I have is really smooth , I believe I have a sewing motor and pedal assembly
I have a foot pedal too but that’s just because I haven’t gotten around to getting a dimmer switch or similar. You want to keep a constant speed on the spindle when turning, something very hard to achieve unless you are flooring the foot pedal.
 

kevin h

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Apr 9, 2015
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cambridge md
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I have a dimmer / fan control rheostat , mounted in an elec. outlet box with plug ends on it , I also use this for my soldering irons for stained glass work . good luck
 

RJSoftware

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I have a dimmer / fan control rheostat , mounted in an elec. outlet box with plug ends on it , I also use this for my soldering irons for stained glass work . good luck
awesome idea, a variable outlet. Soldering iron, grinding wheel, fan, dryer, ... gotta try this.
 

NewBernWatchmaker

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Jun 1, 2018
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New Bern, NC
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Here's how it turned out. If I remount the counter on a block I can get rid of the extra pulley (the belt came in at too low of an angle and would rub to headstock. Turns about 600-800 rpm with this setup.

IMG_20180709_205002454.jpg
 

RJSoftware

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Looks good. A rheostat should then allow you to adjust from 0 to 7/800 rpm. An electric box with dimmer installed on table in convienience reach is best.

If you still have stall out when adjusting to very low speeds, then you may have to increase the countershaft reduction. Mine is about 1/3, meaning the small pulley diameter is 1/3rd the larger. This enables my motor to maintain motion at low speeds without the stall.

The acid test will be how slow you can turn and still produce the long curly strings of swarf.

The slower the easier.
 

RJSoftware

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Apr 15, 2005
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ac·id test
ˈasəd test/
noun
  1. a conclusive test of the success or value of something.
    "the pact with the rebels is an acid test of the government's sincerity
 
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