My first Schatz servicing

G J M

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Mar 2, 2018
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Greetings. I hope this finds everyone well.
I have a Schatz with 49 stamped on the movement that has gotten hard to wind and only runs about two months when wound. I haven't ever wound it tight but it has gotten to where it is difficult to turn the key. I believe it needs servicing. I am normally on the clock repair forum and by reading and asking questions the folks here have help me get comfortable with my other clocks. I have been doing a lot of reading on 400 day clocks here in the forums and have read my copy of the 400 Day Clock Repair Guide by Mr. Terwilliger. I wanted to ask if there was any first hand advice from anyone on what to do and what not to do and what to look out for. This is the one clock that my wife really loves so I can't mess it up. Thank you. Gary
 

Schatznut

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The Schatz 49 is a workhorse and pretty much bulletproof. There are no gotchas in its design or construction - just a good basic 400-day clock. The symptoms you describe point to a mainspring that has never been serviced. It needs to be removed from the barrel, thoroughly cleaned and degreased, and then reassembled with a good modern synthetic oil (I use synthetic automatic transmission fluid and it works great for me). Be advised that this spring is very healthy - witness the mass of the pendulum and the fact it takes a .004 suspension spring. Treat it with respect and don't let it get away from you.
 

KurtinSA

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Nov 24, 2014
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Glad you're giving it a shot, Gary. We'd love to see some pictures of the clock and back plate...maybe even some showing the gears/arbors between the plates.

Sounds like you have issues with corrosion and/or lubrication. You'll definitely need to deal with that main spring. As you're probably aware, you need to ensure that the main spring has been wound down fully before taking things apart. Servicing the main spring means removing it from the barrel. Generally, it's best to have a "tool" for that. I use an Ollie Baker main spring winder...somewhat expensive and might be on short supply. There are homemade winders...search the forum for "Joe Collins" for a general idea.

Note that in 400-day clocks, friction is your enemy. These clocks don't have much reserve power, so you need to do everything you can to minimize that. As stated, the Schatz 49 clocks are well built and should give good results with some TLC.

Kurt
 

G J M

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Mar 2, 2018
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Thank you for your reply Schatznut. I had a feeling the mainspring needed to be cleaned and lubed. I don't believe it has been worked on before so should I just order a new one and be done with it? Sitting here looking at it I realized the winding arbor looks to be on the opposite side of the barrel from what I an used to seeing. I am a hobbyist so I haven't seen many. It seems I read something about that. I have a Webster that works fine for me so I will have to think about it harder. Believe me I will take care. Working with a mainspring is the one part I am still very nervous about. Thanks again
 

G J M

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Thank you for your reply KurtinSA. I have a Joe Collins a friend built for me but my wife found a rebuilt Webster for a very good price and I use it. I would love to have an Ollie Baker but simply being a hobbyist I can't justify the cost. My Webster has an arbor support that makes it easier and I have gotten comfortable with it. I can't see any signs of the clock being worked on before so I am sure you are right. It needs some attention. My wife misses it and so do I. I will try to dig up the camera and post some pictures. Thanks again.
 

KurtinSA

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I've never seen a Webster in person but pictures suggest is a near-by cousin of an Ollie Baker. Since you've had experience with it on other barrels, I'm sure you'll figure out how to get it done.

Buying a new spring might be a good way to go. You should clean the new spring anyway as it might come with preservative oils on it. Once clean, then oil it sparingly like you would do on any spring barrel.

Kurt
 

Schatznut

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I've worked on many 400- and 1000-day clocks and have never found one that needed a spring replacement, unless someone had been into it before and horsed the spring out of the barrel without a spring winder. If it comes out cleanly, expands evenly and isn't coned, you should be fine just cleaning, lubricating and reinstalling it.
 

G J M

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Mar 2, 2018
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Thank you Schatznut. I'll look at it and see. If I am not sure I will be back asking more questions.
I found the camera that works with this new fangled machine so computer illiterate me will try and attach them.
Thank you KurtinSA. I am feeling better about working with the mainspring and with never replacing one I did not know it needed to be cleaned of a preservative. That is why I love this. I am still learning.
Looks like I got pictures, pictures and more pictures.

IMG_0937.JPG IMG_0938.JPG IMG_0939.JPG IMG_0936.JPG IMG_0936.JPG IMG_0937.JPG IMG_0938.JPG IMG_0939.JPG IMG_0936.JPG
 

Schatznut

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You have a nice one there - the pretty red enamel; the lack of corrosion or rust - a great way to start. This one is right at the end of the era where Schatz installed adjustable pallets. Resist the temptation to monkey with them. If no one has been into it since it was built, there should be no reason for you to have to do so.
 

KurtinSA

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Definitely is very nice! The base doesn't have leveling feet and info I had found was that Schatz added this in early 1953. Given the date of "1 53" on this clock, this is among the last of the clocks to have no leveling feet. I notice it also says "Jahresuhren Fabrik" in the logo circle...this was replaced in mid 1954 with the "Aug. Schatz" logo.

Kurt
 

G J M

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Mar 2, 2018
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Thank you both for your help. When we got it the suspension spring was broken so with the help of the repair guide I ordered a suspension spring, set the fork to match the illustration, installed it, wound it about two turns and started it. This was back when I didn't take notes in my terribly bad green horn days but if I remember right it started out running fast. It gained around ten minutes in four or five days. I was getting ready to tweak the rating nut when I noticed it was still around ten minutes fast. I reset it and found it was only gaining two minutes every two and a half months or so. Believe me, the last thing I am going to do is mess around with the pallets. I learned very quickly (fortunately not the hard way) that is voo-doo unless you know what you are doing. I like it even more now that I find out it comes from "right at the end of an era". I have more projects going than I can count so it will be awhile before it gets done but when it does I we let you folks know. Might even give me something to brag about.:chuckling:
 

Schatznut

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This is my philosophy. Experience is the best teacher. Dive in, after 100 attempts, you'll be getting a handle on it.
Yep, I've got about three dozen clocks but I've done about 100 overhauls. Do the math...
 

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