My chimeless Hermle movement - Doug Wins!

Discussion in 'General Clock Discussions' started by gregr, Sep 13, 2002.

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  1. gregr

    gregr Guest

    Some of you may have read my post yesterday about a Hermle movement which I installed, but could not get to chime.

    I am happy to report that Doug's suggestion was right on. Moving that 'L' shaped arm up & out of the way unlocked something in the chiming mechanism (it made a pronounced click when it moved). I moved the hands forward and the hammers hammered!

    This brings up a question in my mind: What is the purpose of this mechanism? Isn't it somewhat redundant to the switch which turns the chimes on & off? Or, is it designed to protect the mechanism when the clock is shipped or moved? Should I re-engage this lock when I move the clock in a car, for example?

    Installing the chime rods brought up another question. Is there an ideal position the rods should occupy, relative to the hammers? Right now, the hammers are situation about 1/8" (maybe slightly more) ABOVE the chime rods. Should they rest directly on the rods?

    Thanks, all, who offered their time & talent yesterday to give me input on my problem!

    Greg
     
  2. gregr

    gregr Guest

    Some of you may have read my post yesterday about a Hermle movement which I installed, but could not get to chime.

    I am happy to report that Doug's suggestion was right on. Moving that 'L' shaped arm up & out of the way unlocked something in the chiming mechanism (it made a pronounced click when it moved). I moved the hands forward and the hammers hammered!

    This brings up a question in my mind: What is the purpose of this mechanism? Isn't it somewhat redundant to the switch which turns the chimes on & off? Or, is it designed to protect the mechanism when the clock is shipped or moved? Should I re-engage this lock when I move the clock in a car, for example?

    Installing the chime rods brought up another question. Is there an ideal position the rods should occupy, relative to the hammers? Right now, the hammers are situation about 1/8" (maybe slightly more) ABOVE the chime rods. Should they rest directly on the rods?

    Thanks, all, who offered their time & talent yesterday to give me input on my problem!

    Greg
     
  3. jacks61fd

    jacks61fd Registered User

    Jul 2, 2002
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    Greg-- I believe that "L" shaped lever is really used when you move the clock, the hammers should sit just abobe the chime rods as yours do if they rest on the rods you will get just a dull thud when the clock strikes Jack
     
  4. Andy Krietzer

    Andy Krietzer Registered User

    Feb 21, 2001
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    There are also people who don't like to hear a clock chime, especially at night. Imagine that! Of course, they don't have to wind it.
     

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