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Movement won't ding past five strikes.

Gregory Douglas

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Dec 26, 2020
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I have a Howard Miller ship's wheel clock that won't chime past fives strikes. The rack won't drop past the fifth notch. Any suggestions? Not versed enough in the mechanism yet.

WIN_20211016_13_01_51_Pro.jpg WIN_20211016_13_02_07_Pro.jpg
 

Uhralt

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It seems that there is something in the way that prevents the rack from falling any deeper. Watch closely and find out what it is that stops the rack, and why it is there. Then the solution will probably become clear.

Uhralt
 

shutterbug

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Looks like a ships bell striker. Do you know how the bells should sound? When you say "5 strikes" is that 5 individual strikes or 5 double strikes?
 

wow

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Just to be sure you understand the sequence of the strikes on a ships bell:
12:30——1 bell
1:00———2 bells
1:30———3 bells
2:00———4 bells
2:30———5 bells
3:00———6 bells
3:30———7 bells
4:00———8 bells
4:30———1 bell
5:00———2 bells
And so on
What is yours doing?
 

Tim Orr

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Good afternoon, Gregory!

On a ship's bell strike clock, the thing strikes in pairs of bells, "dingding" for each hour strike. At the half-hour, a somewhat ingenious mechanism "subtracts" the second ding from the last strike, so that you get, say, for 1:30, "dingding, ding." Each "doubled" strike is for a given hour (repeating the sequence every four hours), and each single final ding is for the half-hour.

So, it should ding up to a total of 8 times maximum (at 12:00, 4:00, 8:00, then repeat).

Best regards!

Tim Orr
 

Gregory Douglas

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Good afternoon, Gregory!

On a ship's bell strike clock, the thing strikes in pairs of bells, "dingding" for each hour strike. At the half-hour, a somewhat ingenious mechanism "subtracts" the second ding from the last strike, so that you get, say, for 1:30, "dingding, ding." Each "doubled" strike is for a given hour (repeating the sequence every four hours), and each single final ding is for the half-hour.

So, it should ding up to a total of 8 times maximum (at 12:00, 4:00, 8:00, then repeat).

Best regards!

Tim Orr
That is a bit confusing to me. Thanks for the response. I appreciate the information and the time it took you to compose it. Greg
 

Gregory Douglas

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Dec 26, 2020
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Just to be sure you understand the sequence of the strikes on a ships bell:
12:30——1 bell
1:00———2 bells
1:30———3 bells
2:00———4 bells
2:30———5 bells
3:00———6 bells
3:30———7 bells
4:00———8 bells
4:30———1 bell
5:00———2 bells
And so on
What is yours doing?
I wonder why they designed this that way. How the heck can you tell what time it is when you listen to the bells? Strange. Thanks for the response. I really appreciate it. Greg
 

Dick Feldman

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From Chelsea's Web Page:

The History of Ship Clock Chimes

Mariners have used a unique bell code to tell time at sea for hundreds of years. The code is based on the crew's typical workday routine while the vessel is underway. A ship at sea requires constant attention throughout the day's 24 hours. Therefore, the day is divided into six four-hour periods that are each called a "watch." Similarly, the crew is broken up into three divisions. Division members stand their individually assigned duties on two watches per day, with eight hours off duty between watches.

First Watch: 8:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m.
Mid-Watch (also Black Watch): 12:00 a.m. to 4:00 a.m.
Morning Watch: 4:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m.
Forenoon Watch: 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
Afternoon Watch: 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Evening Watch: 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

To rotate each division's watch times, the Evening Watch is periodically divided into two watches. These are called Dog Watches because they "dog" the watch schedule for all divisions ahead by one watch period.

The watch officer struck the ship's bell every half-hour to apprise the crew of the time. A single bell denoted the end of the first half-hour, and one bell was added each half-hour. Eight bells, therefore, signaled the end of each four-hour watch.
 
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shutterbug

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Yes. We might also note that these clocks weren't used on ships. They were invented for ex-navy men to enjoy the nostalgia of their time at sea. On ships, a large bell was used as Dick outlined above. I suppose it's possible that crew members might have them in their quarters though.
When you get used to it, you'll be able to tell the time from the strikes just fine ;)
 

Tim Orr

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Good afternoon, Greg!

You get used to it. You can tell which of the 6 four-hour sequences you are in by feel. After all, you can generally tell if it's midnight, as opposed to 8 pm or 4 am, and 4 am as opposed to 8 am or noon, etc. I also find – and I suspect I'm not the only one – that I can "remember" the strike sequence I hear and "play it back" in my brain to figure out what time it is. With a conventional hour and half-hour strike, I can't tell what hour it is on the half. With a ship's bell clock, I always know what "hour" it is, regardless of whether it is striking the hour or the half.

I find that when I wake up in the middle of the night and hear my ship's bell strike, I can quickly figure out what time it is, even when groggy.

You'll get accustomed to it. However, to your original question, if it is only striking 5 times max, something needs work. You should get 8 strikes at midnight, 4, 8, noon, 4 and 8. You should get the nearest hour strike (or none at 12:30, 4:30, 8:30, 12:30, 4:30, 8:30) PLUS a single lonely ding at each of those half hours.

When the cam follower drops into the deepest notch of the snail, you should get 8 dings, MINUS 1 if it's a half-hour before 4,8,12,4,8,12. Notice how wide those notches in the snail are. Very different from a conventional hour strike snail. That's because each one gets used twice.

Chin up! More will be revealed!

Best regards!

Tim
 

Gregory Douglas

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Dec 26, 2020
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Good afternoon, Greg!

You get used to it. You can tell which of the 6 four-hour sequences you are in by feel. After all, you can generally tell if it's midnight, as opposed to 8 pm or 4 am, and 4 am as opposed to 8 am or noon, etc. I also find – and I suspect I'm not the only one – that I can "remember" the strike sequence I hear and "play it back" in my brain to figure out what time it is. With a conventional hour and half-hour strike, I can't tell what hour it is on the half. With a ship's bell clock, I always know what "hour" it is, regardless of whether it is striking the hour or the half.

I find that when I wake up in the middle of the night and hear my ship's bell strike, I can quickly figure out what time it is, even when groggy.

You'll get accustomed to it. However, to your original question, if it is only striking 5 times max, something needs work. You should get 8 strikes at midnight, 4, 8, noon, 4 and 8. You should get the nearest hour strike (or none at 12:30, 4:30, 8:30, 12:30, 4:30, 8:30) PLUS a single lonely ding at each of those half hours.

When the cam follower drops into the deepest notch of the snail, you should get 8 dings, MINUS 1 if it's a half-hour before 4,8,12,4,8,12. Notice how wide those notches in the snail are. Very different from a conventional hour strike snail. That's because each one gets used twice.

Chin up! More will be revealed!

Best regards!

Tim
Wow! That is awesome information, Tim. It all makes sense now. I'm giving the clock to a veteran navy man and wanted to make sure the chimes are understood. You've helped, greatly. Greg
 

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