Moseley lathe headstock disassembly

Discussion in 'Horological Tools' started by arthurliu82, Dec 7, 2018.

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  1. arthurliu82

    arthurliu82 New Member

    Jan 17, 2010
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    Hi folks!
    I recently received a No.1 Moseley lathe. It’s quite petite with a 9.5” bed and 3.5” swing. I was surprised and pleased to discover that it’s 8mm (it looks like it takes Moseley conoidal collets, can anyone confirm). I’d like to give it a full deep cleaning and have started to disassemble the headstock. Brass dust covers removed and slotted thread removed successfully. Pulley set screw removed. After all this the spindle still does not come out. Does anybody know what to do? I’ve read others recommend giving the back (threaded) end a tap to encourage release, and I’m comfortable doing that, but I want to make sure I haven’t missed any other step.

    Thank you!

    EADC0E7D-0871-428F-BB74-4C8EB1196475.jpeg 13B16D80-6C5B-4C80-AA22-E742A168A49B.jpeg
     
  2. glenhead

    glenhead Registered User
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    Nov 15, 2009
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    Whack it with a mallet. Wood, rawhide, rubber, brass - anything but steel. If you don't have a mallet, put a piece of wood across the threaded end and whack it (the wood) with a hammer. It's scary as bleep the first time you do it, especially if it's reluctant to pop loose and you have to whack harder.

    Glen
     
  3. Keith Conklin

    Keith Conklin Registered User
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    Aug 22, 2018
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    Hi Guys,

    I have a few questions on this topic as well, if i may.
    I have a Peerless that looks much the same as the Mosley pictured.
    Would the disassembly be the same. I have gotten to the same point as Arthur and stopped as well.
    Also, what lubricant is used on these lathes.

    Keith

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  4. Bohemian Bill

    Bohemian Bill Registered User
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    Nov 5, 2010
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    Hi Arthur & Keith..I had many watchmakers lathes apart over the past twenty years and they are almost the same construction. I made a homemade screw press for safe disassembly of headstock shaft arbor but a hammer and a piece of hard oak wood will work. 1)Firstly, with loupe inspect & remove all set screws in the pulley with tiny screwdriver unless someone replaced it with allen screw.. Most time there are one but sometime in past someone would add a second one due to slippage. 2) Remove the split threaded ring nut at end of shaft arbor by screwing CCW. 3) Remove oil hole dust covers on each end of head stock. 4) Place wood piece and wack it with a hammer and look for shaft movement and getting loose in the bearing area. If it is hard all the way use a piece of brass round shaft material to finish tapping it apart. 5)Take all pieces apart and clean with solvent. Use brass wire to make sure all oil holes are open. 6) Make several trial assembly making sure everything is somewhat tight and alignment is right with rear male bearing keyways on arbor.. At this point check the depth of the pin that align with 8mm collet. I had to tap this pin deeper to prevent scoring on the bearing surface. 7) Oil all bearing parts with Mobil 1 oil. 8) To assemble do it in reverse order. Hardest thing to do is lining up the pulley set screw with hole in shaft. Make sure the belt is installed before assembly. 9) Tighten the split ring nut CW until pulley gets harder to turn. You may have to back the split ring back a little but no end shake on arbor.. 10) Oil the bearings with a drop or two of Mobil 1 everytime you use the lathe.. Oil the electric motor once to twice a year. I hope this will help..Bill
     
    Dave T likes this.
  5. glenhead

    glenhead Registered User
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    Nov 15, 2009
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    I can't add much to what Bill said. For metal-to-metal bearings there's nothing better than Mobil 1. Specifically, for this application use 0w40. You want really lightweight oil. Fully-synthetic sewing machine oil is also a great choice, if it's handier. It's usually a single-weight oil, and very light. The Zoom Spout bottles for sewing machine oil are pretty danged handy, too. They're available empty.

    Either way, Bill's #10 is dead-on correct - oil the bearings every time you start a session. I frequently oil mine two or three times in a day if I'm doing a lot of turning; it's really impossible to do it too much. You're flooding the bearings that way, and it helps flush out the bleep.

    Glen
     
  6. dave-b

    dave-b Registered User

    Jul 28, 2010
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    #6 dave-b, Dec 9, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2018
    One more thing to beware of - if the pulley is stuck to the spindle, then driving out the spindle can cause damage to the pulley on the bottom "U" shape of the frame. Protect it with a stick of wood between pulley and frame. (maybe not to the lathes in question, but it certainly applies to all-metal pulleys)
    Dave
     
  7. gmorse

    gmorse Registered User
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    Jan 7, 2011
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    Hi Glen,

    I used to put 3-in-1 in my 6mm Geneva pattern lathe, but I now use Castrol Hyspin E5 which is a very thin high-speed spindle oil, and the difference is very noticeable; it spins more freely and I've been able to reduce the play slightly. I also add oil at least every time I use it, and as you say, it flushes the bearings. This lathe has plain bearings by the way.

    My Cowells gets the Mobil 1 treatment.

    Regards,

    Graham
     
  8. Keith Conklin

    Keith Conklin Registered User
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    Aug 22, 2018
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    Thank you all very much, (and especially bill) for taking the time to to answer a really important question.
    I'll let you know how it goes.
     

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