Moral dilema

NigelW

Registered User
Jan 2, 2015
452
44
28
London and Kent
Country
Researching clocks by the maker of my current restoration project I came across a reference to a clock in the "stolen" section of a horological journal dated nearly 20 years ago, together with a police crime reference (in the UK). A clock fitting the exact description sold at auction last year. I didn't buy it, but should I inform someone? It is quite possible of course that the stolen clock was retrieved and sold legitimately.
 

novicetimekeeper

Registered User
Jul 26, 2015
10,927
873
113
Dorset
Country
Region
yes, you should report it. Whether anybody does anything about it is another thing entirely. Thefts of antiques are extremely damaging to our interests, and any chance of apprehending those who abet them should be taken.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dave T

Jim DuBois

Gibbs Literary Award
NAWCC Member
Sponsor
Jun 14, 2008
3,315
899
113
Magnolia, TX
Country
Region
I would report it. Moral dilemmas tend to be painful for someone no matter what route is taken. But, right is still right, and if relevant information about a theft becomes apparent I would want it reported if the theft was of my property. Even as someone else property it still is the correct path is it not?
 

NigelW

Registered User
Jan 2, 2015
452
44
28
London and Kent
Country
I reported it this morning. A fellow member of my clock club is a retired officer from the Met and agreed I should do so, but thought they probably wouldn't thank me privately for reopening a 20 year old case!

This is the clock:

George Etherington London circa 1700, an eight day long case clock with brass and silvered 12" sq

And this is the ad in the June 2000 edition of the Horological Journal. It has to be the same one. Of course it may have been recovered and put up for sale legitimately.

Screen Shot 2019-11-01 at 09.11.38.png
 

novicetimekeeper

Registered User
Jul 26, 2015
10,927
873
113
Dorset
Country
Region
Hard to believe two identical clocks were vandalised in the same way. I can't work out how they got everything to align, was the movement made especially for the dial or did it always have such high winding arbours? The movement does seem to have fuinned pillars, albeit adapted to screwed pillars rather than pinned, and the dial feet appear to have moved. Perhaps they made new plates and kept the old pillars, nevertheless, it is vandalism. This clock would have been pretty worthless in 1900 so they wouldn't have seen it as such at the time.
 

novicetimekeeper

Registered User
Jul 26, 2015
10,927
873
113
Dorset
Country
Region
Yes, the case is lovely, I could use that.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
165,351
Messages
1,439,170
Members
86,162
Latest member
Evocatas
Encyclopedia Pages
1,101
Total wiki contributions
2,873
Last edit
Weekly News 7/7/19 by Tom McIntyre