Missing trim wood type?

Discussion in 'Clock Case Restoration and Repair' started by Will R, Sep 26, 2019.

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  1. Will R

    Will R Registered User

    Aug 31, 2019
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    Hi guys,

    I’ve recently acquired a really nice HAC clock which will be a great second clock to work on servicing, repairing and restoring.

    The case, whilst in generally good shape, is missing some of it’s decorative trim at the bottom. I am keen to craft a piece to fill the small missing section between the two existing pieces.

    Having little experience in this area I was wondering if anyone has any idea what type of wood this might be so that I can match it? Or will it matter what type of wood it is/be noticeable once there is shellac on it? I’ve attached some pictures below of the case and a close up of the section in question.

    Thank you,
    Will.

    FB89A56A-2CE7-4F98-AFB4-E345D3920A3E.jpeg 6CD02C0D-D5E9-40C8-BBB9-A406FEF7E1E6.jpeg
     
  2. wow

    wow Registered User
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    Jun 24, 2008
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    Will, I remember seeing a piece of that trim somewhere in my bone pile. I will look for it if you are interested.
    Will Walker
     
  3. gleber

    gleber Registered User

    Jun 15, 2015
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    It looks like oak to me. Are you skilled enough to recreate the pattern?

    Tom
     
  4. Will R

    Will R Registered User

    Aug 31, 2019
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    Hi Will and Tom,

    Thank you for your replies.

    I wasn’t sure this would be something anyone would have a spare for! If I measure the trim up for size later today it would be great to see if it matches up to your spare piece, thank you.

    I haven’t made anything like this particular trim before but I have an idea of how I would go about it and luckily quite a bit of spare oak from a box I’ve made in the past. I always want things to be perfect so even if it took a good few trials to get right I think I would be able to make something I’m happy with eventually.

    Will.
     
  5. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    It will be a challenge, but doable and if you can get it to look okay or better, it will be rewarding. Good luck and keep us posted.

    Tom
     
  6. Will R

    Will R Registered User

    Aug 31, 2019
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    It seems to be about 3.2mm deep by about 5.5mm diameter. I think it could be a neat little challenge to try to perfect over the course of the service and repair journey. Still quite new to clock repair so not in any big rush to get it completed. Thank you for the offer though Will, it’s really kind for you to offer to find the spare for me (I may be in contact if it goes terribly wrong!).

    It sure Will, I hope to do it justice, however many attempts it takes to get right! Thank you Tom, will make sure to keep you updated.

    Will.
     
  7. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    Are those "balls" glued on individually or carved into the piece? I've done a fair amount if carving and I am trying to figure it how I would approach it...

    Tom
     
  8. Will R

    Will R Registered User

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    The balls a joined together as a strip but glued onto the case. I have a fair amount of oak left over so can do a number to trial pieces until I get it right. Having also never used shellac before it will be an interesting learning curve. I believe it’s best to approach shellac in multiple lighter layers rather than trying to get it right in one coat so will do a number of test pieces and label them for future reference so I can look back at and compare them.

    Will.
     
  9. Rockin Ronnie

    Rockin Ronnie Registered User
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    I would be tempted to replace the entire piece rather than fill it in.

    Ron
     
  10. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    I agree. It will probably be easier to make all new than to get a partial section to match.

    Tom
     
  11. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    I agree. It will probably be easier to make all new than to get a partial section to match.

    Tom
     
  12. Uhralt

    Uhralt Registered User
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    Shellac should definitely be applied in thin layers. See here for a lot of information:

    Shellac tutorials

    Uhralt
     
  13. Will R

    Will R Registered User

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    A great point and certainly the better way to approach it I think. I’ll work ahead with it that way. Thank you.

    Thanks Uhralt, there’s a lot of great information and advice in the link you provided, it will help a lot for the coming trim replacement.

    Will.
     
  14. shutterbug

    shutterbug Moderator
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    It looks to me like it might just be a series of wooden buttons glued to the back board.
     
  15. gleber

    gleber Registered User

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    Yes, that is why asked if they were individual or carved in place. I think it would be easier to glue on a series of buttons than to try to carve each one in place.

    Tom
     
  16. Clocks In The Grove

    Clocks In The Grove Registered User
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    The little balls can be carved using the bead from a beadboard, or make your own bead using hand plane or router. The bead should be about the size of the ball you want to make. Then take a gouge that has a radius about the size of the balls and outline the each ball with the correct spacing between them. Remove waste between the balls. Cut the bead strip from the board and insert into the clock case.
    The Woodwright did this on one of his shows on PBS in the USA.
    OR find a wood carver.
    ..Bob..
     
  17. Will R

    Will R Registered User

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    Hey Shutterbug, Tom & Bob,

    Sorry for the delayed reply, I have been away for a short break over the weekend. That’s a great point. It really would be easier to do them individually than to create a whole 1 piece strip. I imagine broken pieces everywhere trying to put that together. I’ll try out some test pieces based on your advice, see how they go and keep you updated! :D

    Will.
     

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